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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2013
Children used paper plates, yarn, feathers and beads to make dream catchers decorated with words and phrases like "hope" and "I have a dream" to celebrate the memory of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday while their parents watched President Barack Obama's inauguration on a big-screen television. To Terry Taylor, the dual celebration at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum was a full-circle moment. "People seemed pretty excited; they cheered when Barack took the oath. They were clapping and stomping their feet," said Taylor, education programs coordinator at the museum.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
The Baltimore Museum of Art has received its most significant gift of contemporary photography in more than 25 years. Baltimore collectors Tom and Nancy O'Neil have given the institution two dozen color and black-and-white works by 19 important artists of our time, including Dawoud Bey, celebrated for his portrait photography, and Edward Burtynsky, whose photos document humanity's impact on the environment. Among others represented in the collection are Rodney Graham, Naoya Hatakeyama, Richard Misrach and James Welling.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Carvey G. Davis Jr., a former Baltimore Transit Co. motorman who never lost his affection for streetcars and was a longtime supporter and benefactor of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of bone cancer Saturday at his Glen Burnie home. He was 90. "Some of Carvey's fondest memories were running and riding streetcars," said John O'Neill, longtime Baltimore Streetcar Museum president, who lives in Jarrettsville. "He was the ultimate rail fan and the last link for all of us to the great era of Baltimore streetcars," said Martin K. Van Horn, a Pennsylvania Railroad historian and streetcar museum member.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2011
A man's body was pulled Tuesday morning from shallow waters of the Inner Harbor near the 1400 block of Key Highway, Baltimore police said. The body was found about 8 a.m., police said, near a stretch of Key Highway home to the Baltimore Museum of Industry. jtorbati@baltsun.com
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | October 14, 2001
If you're going to call your fund-raiser "Steamboat Landing 2001," it's a good idea to have both steamboat and landing on hand. Good thing this was the Baltimore Museum of Industry's annual shindig, because both were parked right outside the South Baltimore building. "There are only two working steam tugboats in the entire U.S., one in California, and this one. It's a historic landmark," said museum volunteer coordinator Rob Williams, referring to the 1906 tug Baltimore tied up at the dock.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Lou Reed, the trail-blazing musician who died Sunday at the age of 71, left a non-musical mark on Baltimore a couple years ago. When the popular exhibit "Andy Warhol: The Last Decade" was at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Oct. 17, 2010 to Jan. 9, 2011, visitors who plugged into the audio tour heard Reed's voice providing the narration. Reed had a longtime connection to Warhol, who had been a sponsor of the Velvet Underground in the 1960s. "Lou Reed's instantly recognizable voice brought the feel of New York City's cutting edge culture of the 1970s and early '80s to the experience of our exhibition," said Kristen Hileman, the BMA's Curator of Contemporary Art. "It was a thrill to have a rock and roll legend be a part of the BMA experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Guest blog post by Mary Carole McCauley/The Baltimore Sun The Baltimore Museum of Art announced Wednesday that it will reopen its historic entrance to visitors on Nov. 23, 2014, in celebration of the museum's 100th anniversary. The elegant portico roof designed in 1929 by the great American architect John Russell Pope is supported by six Ionic columns. The entrance, which is reached at the top of a flight of stairs, seems to float above the surrounding terrain. The exterior lighting is being updated, and after the renovation, the stairs will be used as a meeting place for visitors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
The Baltimore Museum of Art looks a little off-putting these days. Much of the exterior is covered over and a good chunk of the interior closed off to the public while an extensive renovation project is under way. But once you navigate the temporary entrance, things are still very inviting. Head to the Contemporary Wing's Front Room, where temporary exhibits provide an entryway to the BMA's rich permanent collection of modern art. The current exhibit offers photographs by An-My Le. Expect to spend extra time lingering over these works, shot with a large-format camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
More than five years after a financial crisis ravaged the U.S. economy, the Baltimore Museum of Art has finally run out of options. Museum administrators announced Monday that after exhausting other cost-cutting measures, they have laid off 14 employees, or 9 percent of the 154-member staff. The cuts, which affected 11 full-time and three part-time employees, took effect immediately. The job cuts are needed to make up a projected deficit of more than $500,000 by July 1, according to museum director Doreen Bolger, and to accommodate a budget that is shrinking by $1 million from its current level of $12.9 million for the 2012-2013 fiscal year.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
Get ready for some seriously cheap entertainment. Free Fall Baltimore, the city's annual nod to its budget-conscious fans of culture, will return for its ninth installment in October. Scores of museums, entertainment venues, cultural organizations and other city attractions will be opening their doors free of charge, offering a range of events including plays, dance performances, tours, concerts and lectures. Among the offerings: •The Welcome Winter Family Fair, Oct. 4 at Hampden's COW Company Theatre •Free admission to the Baltimore Museum of Industry on Oct. 5 and 14 •A WEAA-sponsored lecture and performance on "Baltimore's Jazz Scene: 1934" on Oct. 9 at the Walters Art Museum •Puppet-making workshops and shows at the Black Cherry Puppet Theater, every Sunday in October •A performance of "Ain't Misbehavin' by the Vagabond Players on Oct. 16 •A Harbor Harvest Children's Festival Oct. 19at West Shore Park •An open rehearsal with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra on Oct. 21 In all, nearly 70 groups are participating in Free Fall Baltimore 2014, offering more than 200 events and activities; some require tickets or advance registration.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
Artist Neil Feather, who builds mechanized musical instruments from bowling balls, film projectors and cigar boxes, among other objects, received this year's $25,000 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday evening. Trained as a ceramicist, Feather said he draws inspiration from antique machinery and "strange technology that didn't make it to the mainstream. " "I like listening to all the matter around me vibrating," Feather, 58, said in a phone interview after the award ceremony at the Walters Art Museum . The Waverly resident is a founding member of the Red Room Collective and the High Zero Foundation, groups that have pushed Baltimore to a vanguard of the international experimental music movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Seth Adelsberger is a 34-year-old Baltimore painter and printmaker. He does not have a master's degree from an art school, he is not represented by a gallery, and he has not won a prestigious prize. Nonetheless, on Sunday, a solo show that distills Adelsberger's visual experiments over the past five years opens at the Baltimore Museum of Art . The exhibit is an unusual honor for an unproven painter, signaling to the art world nationwide that museum curators think Adelsberger is a talent worth watching.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
If you had to describe the 2014 Janet and Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize Finalists Exhibition at the Walters Art Museum in a single word, "visceral" would fit well. "It is about line, color, shape, texture and sound," says Robert Mintz, chief curator at the Walters, who curated the display now on view. Like the 2013 exhibit, this one is being held at the Walters while the usual venue, the Baltimore Museum of Art , is undergoing renovations. Six of the finalists are based in Baltimore, one in Washington.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Patricia S. "Patty" Farber, a former private school art teacher and volunteer who climbed Mount Kilimanjaro when she was in her 60s, died May 10 of lung cancer at her home in Brewster, Mass. The longtime Towson resident was 87. "We got to know the Farbers through the Gilman School connection because our kids were there, and we did a lot of things together," said Richard W. Sunderland, a longtime close friend of Mrs. Farber and her husband. "Patty was a wonderful person and so full of life.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Date: March 29 Her story: Annabelle Alberts, 30, grew up in Detroit. She lived in New York City for 31/2 years before moving to Maryland in September 2012. She is the manager of marketing for Deloitte Forensic in Baltimore. Her parents, Marcia and Mike Alberts, live in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. His story: Scott Palagyi, 31, was born in Pittsburgh but grew up in York, Pa. He spent seven years working in Ohio for Procter & Gamble before being relocated to Baltimore about three years ago. He is the northeast distributions center operations leader for Procter & Gamble in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
Frances W. Riepe, a former interior decorator who had been a trustee of Ladew Topiary Gardens, died May 16 of congestive heart failure at her home in the Brightwood retirement community in Lutherville. She was 91. The daughter of Francis Asbury Warner Jr., founder of the Warner-Graham Co., and Elsie McGee Warner, a homemaker, the former Frances Warner was born in Baltimore and raised on Hollen Road in Cedarcroft. She attended Bryn Mawr School and graduated in 1941 from the Knox School in Cooperstown, N.Y. In 1946, she married George Mitchell Stump Riepe, who later became president of the Warner-Graham Co. Mrs. Riepe earned a certificate in 1964 from the New York School of Interior Design and owned and operated an interior decorating firm from her Guilford home.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
Once summer break begins, boredom can set in. Before the whining starts, we've come up with a list of activities proven with local families. Because there are two kinds of fun we search for during Maryland's summer - in the shade and in the water - we've divided them accordingly. Ice rinks are most popular in the winter months, but we're not sure why everyone in Baltimore isn't gliding around on the cool ice when it's hazy, hot and humid outside. Check out the programs at Mount Pleasant Ice Arena ( mtpleasanticearena.com )
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