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NEWS
November 3, 2000
SKEPTICS of electric power deregulation should look at the new rates negotiated by Baltimore area agencies. They'll save 447 local government accounts an estimated $1.3 million in utility costs over the next 16 months. The deal was negotiated by Baltimore City with First Energy Services Corp. of Ohio on behalf of members of the Baltimore Metropolitan Council. It's the first significant group purchase of power since deregulation took effect in Maryland in July, demonstrating that competitive bidding can cut electricity costs for collective buyers.
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NEWS
May 24, 2014
A recent article reported that Baltimore ranks 28th among the nation's 51 most dangerous cities for pedestrians, with nearly 500 pedestrians killed between 2003 and 2012 ( "Baltimore ranks 28th nationally in pedestrian danger study," May 20). Beyond the tragic statistics of pedestrian deaths and injuries, inadequate pedestrian walkways pose a significant deterrent to walking - the number one aerobic activity for adults in the U.S. A gentle, low-impact form of exercise that's easy, free and suitable for people of all ages and abilities, walking at least 30 minutes a day can improve heart health and reduce the risk of diabetes and obesity.
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BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
In the parlance of bureaucracy, the GBA is moving from the BMC to the GBC.In layman's terms, the Greater Baltimore Alliance, a nonprofit regional economic development and marketing program, is being shifted from under the Baltimore Metropolitan Council to the Greater Baltimore Committee."
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser Getting there | February 22, 2010
T here are all kinds of ways to look at a pair of snowstorms dumping about 40 inches of flakes on our heads in a single week. Tragedy. Comedy. An excuse to miss work or school. What might be most useful, however, is to look at it as a learning experience. Because something like this could happen again. And it might or might not wait another 100 years. Bad as they were, the twin snowstorms of February 2010 were not a worst-case scenario. Imagine a massive ice storm bringing down power lines all over metropolitan Baltimore - a fate avoided this time around - followed by 30 inches of heavy snow blocking utility trucks from responding, then a deep freeze with temperatures near zero.
NEWS
July 14, 2003
More from D.C. area choosing to use BWI, Dec. survey shows More travelers from the Washington area are choosing to fly through BWI, according to a license plate survey recently released by the Maryland Aviation Administration. The Baltimore Metropolitan Council conducted a four-day survey of 16,002 vehicles in the airport's parking lots in December. The survey found that 47 percent of BWI's customers live in and around the nation's capital, up from 44.6 percent in the 2001 study, with a total representation of 28.9 percent from the Baltimore region.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1995
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke announced plans yesterday to revamp the Greater Baltimore Alliance, a nonprofit regional economic development program.The Baltimore mayor said responsibility for the Alliance would be transferred from the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, a regional strategic planning agency, to the Greater Baltimore Committee, a private nonprofit business organization."
NEWS
May 11, 1992
Will the Baltimore region wage "trash wars" in the 1990s?This is a serious question. Over the past years, several suburban counties have adopted policies to bar the import of solid waste from outside their own boundaries. The city is now retaliating. "We need to do likewise," says City Council President Mary Pat Clarke. She has introduced legislation that would block disposal at the Quarantine landfill of trash, ash and other solid waste originating outside the city.The city and the counties are driven by the same motives.
NEWS
By Andrew Schaefer and Andrew Schaefer,sun reporter | April 21, 2007
Marylanders drive about 155 million miles every day. Tomorrow, state and county officials will mark Earth Day with an event aimed at helping residents drive their daily miles more efficiently. Technicians will offer free efficiency and safety inspections from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., in the parking lot of Unitas Stadium at Towson University. "Driving is the most polluting thing most of us do, so any little thing we can each do to keep our cars in good shape will have a huge cumulative effect," said Peggy Courtright, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
Annapolis still has the feel of a small town, with its historicbuildings and narrow streets. But the city is increasingly facing some of the same urban problems as its metropolitan neighbors.Like Baltimore and Washington, Annapolis is struggling with aging roads and utilities, crime and suburban sprawl. Its business district has been hurt by the sour economy, development has shifted from the downtown, and its work force is shrinking as companies move outside the city limits.To combat these troubles and better compete with the rest of the county, city officials are thinking of establishing an independent planning agency.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1999
While some cities like Boston and New York are boasting of downtown revivals, Baltimore will continue to lose people and jobs in the coming decades unless regional alliances stop the hemorrhaging, national experts warned yesterday."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jessica Anderson,Sun Reporter | June 12, 2008
Sirens rang out at the Pikesville Volunteer Fire Company as engines turned into a parking lot, where firefighters pried off the driver-side door of a wrecked blue Toyota Camry. The firefighters performed the mock rescue at the staged wreck yesterday to help kick off the Baltimore Metropolitan Council's summer Regional Highway Safety Campaign against distracted driving. Capt. Glenn Resnick of the Pikesville Precinct said that all too often at accident scenes, "we can see fast food on the floor, we see the cell phone laying down on the floorboard after the event."
NEWS
By Andrew Schaefer and Andrew Schaefer,sun reporter | April 21, 2007
Marylanders drive about 155 million miles every day. Tomorrow, state and county officials will mark Earth Day with an event aimed at helping residents drive their daily miles more efficiently. Technicians will offer free efficiency and safety inspections from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., in the parking lot of Unitas Stadium at Towson University. "Driving is the most polluting thing most of us do, so any little thing we can each do to keep our cars in good shape will have a huge cumulative effect," said Peggy Courtright, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2003
You may live in Columbia, Dundalk or Aberdeen, but so far as the federal government is concerned, you're now a resident of America's newest twin-cities: Baltimore-Towson. Nearly 150 years after voters chose Towson as headquarters for the new Baltimore County government to keep county leaders away from the corrupting influences and high taxes of Baltimore, Maryland's biggest city and the nation's largest unincorporated county seat find themselves yoked together again. When the federal Office of Management and Budget completed its once-a-decade review of the classifications it uses in naming metropolitan statistical areas this year, it decided to give more recognition to suburban communities with major employment centers.
NEWS
July 14, 2003
More from D.C. area choosing to use BWI, Dec. survey shows More travelers from the Washington area are choosing to fly through BWI, according to a license plate survey recently released by the Maryland Aviation Administration. The Baltimore Metropolitan Council conducted a four-day survey of 16,002 vehicles in the airport's parking lots in December. The survey found that 47 percent of BWI's customers live in and around the nation's capital, up from 44.6 percent in the 2001 study, with a total representation of 28.9 percent from the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2002
Melissa Chatham's request to the six adults seated before her last night at Oakland Mills High School in Columbia seemed simple enough. "Close your eyes, and imagine yourself 10 or 15 years from now - your most cherished dreams and ideas [for the Baltimore region] are realized. What do you see? Whom do you meet? What are your children and grandchildren doing? How do you transform that vision into reality?" That's what the 40 or so people who, despite a thunderous rainstorm, gathered to help conceive, with the help of six groups leaders like Melissa.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2001
The Maryland Department of the Environment has been asked to stop trying to appease Carroll County and keep its hands off the long-standing pact governing the development of land surrounding one of the region's main water supplies. MDE had offered Carroll the possibility of limited development in the Liberty Reservoir watershed if the county were to agree to preserve land for every acre it develops through a process called mitigation. The Baltimore Metropolitan Council made the request to MDE in a letter.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | October 14, 1993
Will light rail heading for Marley Station be built down the median of Ritchie Highway, follow the Baltimore-Annapolis hiking trail or travel along a new route elsewhere?Will the controversial East-West Boulevard have an 80-foot or a 110-foot right of way? How long after the current widening of Ritchie Highway to six lanes will the road again reach capacity?The Greater Severna Park Council's goal is to affect transportation projects before they become realities by asking such questions and airing community concerns.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Jessica Anderson,Sun Reporter | June 12, 2008
Sirens rang out at the Pikesville Volunteer Fire Company as engines turned into a parking lot, where firefighters pried off the driver-side door of a wrecked blue Toyota Camry. The firefighters performed the mock rescue at the staged wreck yesterday to help kick off the Baltimore Metropolitan Council's summer Regional Highway Safety Campaign against distracted driving. Capt. Glenn Resnick of the Pikesville Precinct said that all too often at accident scenes, "we can see fast food on the floor, we see the cell phone laying down on the floorboard after the event."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2001
The Maryland Department of the Environment has been asked to stop trying to appease Carroll County and keep its hands off the longstanding pact governing the development of land surrounding one of the region's main water supplies. MDE had offered Carroll the possibility of limited development in the Liberty Reservoir watershed if the county were to agree to preserve land for every acre it develops through a process called mitigation. The Baltimore Metropolitan Council made the request to MDE in a letter.
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