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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 19, 1995
The Baltimore Metro is the nation's best transportation system as long as the rails don't melt.Congress is going to investigate absolutely everything, up to Election Day and not a day after.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
If Baltimore is indeed becoming Hollywood east - and who are we to argue the point? - then here's your handy map to the movie stars' homes. Only in this case, it's a map to where movie stars have roamed - sites captured forever on film and TV, going back to the 1970s. We begin our journey with a pair of television series, both set in Washington, but filmed right here in Charm City and its environs. And we've also pinpointed a couple of spots from films that are classic Hollywood.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1995
Browning-Ferris Industries Inc., one of the nation's largest trash companies, today will dedicate offices it has moved to Annapolis from northern Anne Arundel County.Ceremonies will include BFI Chairman of the Board William D. Ruckelshaus presenting Anne Arundel Community College with a five-year, $25,000 scholarship. Each year, a $5,000 scholarship will go to a student in environmental studies. Mr. Ruckelshaus served as both the first and fifth administrator of the federal Environmental Protection Agency.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
An amateur baseball league with a reputation for luring many of the area's top players will not field teams in 2014, according to an announcement on its website. Baltimore Metro Baseball, which has fielded teams in multiple age divisions since 1977, "will not hold leagues for the 2014 season," the announcement said. League officials could not immediately be reached for comment. Online message boards indicate the decision to end the league was made in November. In a 500-word explanation posted on its website, Baltimore Metro Baseball says that starting in the early 2000s, participation shrank from 135 teams in nine age divisions to just 30 teams in three age divisions.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS | September 26, 2009
If you're a renter and have issues with your place, you're in good company. Half the rentals in the Baltimore metro area had at least one problem in 2007. But don't feel bad: 41 percent of owner-occupied homes did, too. Those are two nuggets from a new report by the Columbia-based National Center for Healthy Housing, which used federal American Housing Survey data on 45 metro areas to show "a critical need to improve housing conditions in many U.S. cities." The nonprofit group says substandard residences can cause illness, injury or death.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Every month, the average renter of a high-end apartment in Baltimore pays $1.92 per square foot of space, according to a study of third quarter numbers released Thursday by the commercial real estate research firm Delta Associates. At almost $2 per square foot, the cost of renting a top-tier apartment was higher in Baltimore than in any of its surrounding suburbs, the analysis concluded. The western and northwestern sections of Baltimore County were the least expensive places to rent a “Class A” apartment, the firm said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
If Baltimore is indeed becoming Hollywood east - and who are we to argue the point? - then here's your handy map to the movie stars' homes. Only in this case, it's a map to where movie stars have roamed - sites captured forever on film and TV, going back to the 1970s. We begin our journey with a pair of television series, both set in Washington, but filmed right here in Charm City and its environs. And we've also pinpointed a couple of spots from films that are classic Hollywood.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
Local incomes rose less quickly last year than they did in 2005, but the Baltimore metro area held on to its distinction as one of the richest regions in the country. Personal income in the metro area added up to $43,500 for every man, woman and child last year, according to preliminary numbers released yesterday by the Commerce Department. That ranked the region 21st out of the nation's 363 metropolitan regions. Metropolitan Baltimore's income rose about 5.4 percent per person last year, not accounting for the effects of inflation - about the same as the country overall.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | June 27, 2009
When one subway train crashed into the rear of another in Washington this week, killing nine, it quickly raised a question in Baltimore: Could it happen here? Maryland Transit Administration officials aren't taking any chances. Just to be safe, MTA Administrator Paul J. Wiedefeld has ordered an "integrity test" to see how the Baltimore subway's train operation and collision-avoidance systems would perform in a crisis. MTA officials, who don't think an accident like Washington's could happen in Baltimore, are designing a series of tests to simulate potential problems.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | July 15, 2009
If you wanted to buy a home for less than $250,000 three years ago, three-quarters of the market in the Baltimore metro area was out of your price range. Then sellers got walloped. Housing slump. Mortgage meltdown. Recession. Now you under-$250,000 buyers - classic first-time home purchasers - have a lot more to choose from. Properties with asking prices in that range made up 43 percent of the metro area's housing market in May, up from 24 percent in May 2006. More under-$250,000 homes were for sale at the end of May - 8,149 - than in any previous May since 2001, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis of Metropolitan Regional Information Systems data.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
Col. Erland A. Tillman, a decorated Army officer and noted civil engineer who helped design the Maryland Transit Administration's Metro subway from Owings Mills into downtown Baltimore, died of complications from heart failure Sept. 6 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime resident of Brightwood Retirement Community was 101. "He had two 28-year careers, both successful," said Russell Tillman, a nephew who lives in Mississippi. "He was an interesting man. " Colonel Tillman was born in Iowa, then raised in Minnesota, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, where his father was a Lutheran minister.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
The United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association announced the Division III players who earned All-American honors, and a number of players from area programs and the Baltimore metropolitan area were on the list. Stevenson junior defenseman Kyle Holechek (Loyola) earned a spot on the first team. He was joined by Tufts freshman attackman Cole Bailey (Severn), Dickinson junior attackman Brian Cannon (Loyola) and Dickinson senior defenseman Peter Zouck (Gilman). Salisbury placed four players on the second team in senior midfielder Eric Kluge, junior defenseman Josh Martin, senior faceoff specialist Tyler Granelli and freshman short-stick defensive midfielder Preston Dabbs.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
The percentage of homeowners with underwater mortgages in metro Baltimore has dropped below 30 percent, according to data released Thursday by real estate search and number crunching website Zillow. The share of mortgage holders in negative equity declined to 28.1 percent in the third quarter of the year, a statement from the website said. In the second quarter, 30.8 percent of homeowners with mortgages were underwater, it said. The numbers are in line with the national trend, which declined from 30.9 percent to 28.2 percent from the second to third quarter.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Every month, the average renter of a high-end apartment in Baltimore pays $1.92 per square foot of space, according to a study of third quarter numbers released Thursday by the commercial real estate research firm Delta Associates. At almost $2 per square foot, the cost of renting a top-tier apartment was higher in Baltimore than in any of its surrounding suburbs, the analysis concluded. The western and northwestern sections of Baltimore County were the least expensive places to rent a “Class A” apartment, the firm said.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff | January 21, 2012
A winter weather advisory remains in effect for the Baltimore area until 1 p.m. Saturday, as rain continues to fall on top of last night's snow, creating an icy mess. The wintry mix left less than an inch of snow around Baltimore City, but higher accumulations in the outer suburbs, according to observations from the National Weather Service, which lists 1.9 inches near Bel Air and 1.4 inches near Laurel. Freezing rain will continue to fall in the morning, changing to rain in the early afternoon, the National Weather Service says.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 20, 2010
Milton H. "Mickey" Miller, 80, a retired commercial real estate broker and civic leader who ran a successful fundraising campaign for the Peabody Institute, died of congestive heart failure Nov. 12 at Sinai Hospital. The Pikesville resident was 80. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of J. Jefferson Miller, the Hecht department store executive who led downtown Baltimore's urban renewal development in the Charles Center. He was a 1948 Friends School graduate and earned a history degree at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | February 10, 2008
Half the communities in the Baltimore metro area saw average home sale prices decline last year as the housing slump deepened. That's a big change from 2006, the first full year of the downturn, when prices were still rising in eight out of 10 local communities, a Sun analysis found. Price drops hit ZIP codes in every Baltimore-area jurisdiction last year, and about a quarter in the metro area recorded decreases of at least 5 percent. The most expensive counties - Howard, Anne Arundel and Carroll - had the biggest share of ZIP codes where average sale prices fell last year.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2008
The head of mortgage financing giant Fannie Mae said yesterday that he doesn't expect to see "some recovery and growth" in the housing market until 2010. "We think at Fannie Mae that '08 is going to be a tough year, kind of a continuation of the end of 2007; '09 will be similar," said Daniel Mudd, the company's president and chief executive, who spoke at a business journalism conference in Baltimore. Fannie Mae, which buys and repackages loans to sell to investors, claims about half the market for newly issued securities backed by single-family homes.
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