Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaltimore Marathon
IN THE NEWS

Baltimore Marathon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 25, 2011
Perhaps Baltimore would be better served by focusing on foot races like the recent marathon instead of motor sports such as the Baltimore Grand Prix. Many contestants entered the highly successful marathon, which raised a considerable amount of money for charity. It also required a minimum amount of preparation and was very environmentally friendly. By contrast, the IndyCar race required that trees be cut down, streets closed and barricades erected, plus it increased air pollution with the fumes from all those car engines.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 17, 2013
I think it's ridiculous that the Baltimore Marathon had no prize money to give to the winners of any of the levels of this year's race ( "Owings Mills' David Berdan wins Baltimore Marathon," Oct. 12). As The Sun reported, the city of Baltimore benefited from the event to the tune of a $38.6 million economic impact. The entry fee for the full marathon was $110. I'm not sure what the shorter races charged for entry, but I'm sure it wasn't free. I know that Under Armour dropped out as a title sponsor, but there were 27,000 runners!
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
Several hundred runners readying themselves to participate in the Baltimore Running Festival in October are planning an organized training run Saturday morning. The run, which will include water stops for participants along a 10- to 20-mile loop that roughly follows the planned marathon course, is expected to begin at 7 a.m. at the Pulaski Monument in Patterson Park. Falls Road Running is coordinating the run, which is open to participants who pay a $10 registration fee. Though more than 300 runners are expected to participate, streets will not be closed and intersections will not be blocked along the course route, which runs north to Lake Montebello, then west to Druid Hill Park before turning south through downtown and out Key Highway.
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
David Berdan, a 32-year-old science teacher and cross country coach at Garrison Forest, won Saturday's Baltimore Marathon, becoming the first local champion in the 13 years of the Baltimore Running Festival. The Owings Mills resident finished in 2:30:05, almost nine minutes faster than runner-up Brian Crispell (2:38:57), a 37-year-old from Philadelphia. β€œIt's been a goal of mine for a while,” said Berdan, who led the first half of the 2011 marathon before eventually placing 10th.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Under Armour won't be the Baltimore Running Festival's title sponsor going forward, but the company made clear on Thursday it will continue to outfit Baltimore runners. The company has signed a multi-year deal with Corrigan Sports Enterprises Inc., which organizes the running festival, to be the official race-themed apparel and footwear provider. That includes the performance shirts that participants in each of the running festival's events -- the marathon, half-marathon, 5K, relay and kids run run -- receive as part of their official race package.
SPORTS
By Mike Miller, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2010
During a January trip to Ethiopia, Clay Shaw noticed just how world-renowned the Under Armour Baltimore Marathon has become. A few locals sauntered through the running-rich streets of Addis Ababa in T-shirts emblazoned with the marathon's logo, while runners familiar with Shaw's work protracted his name to "Clay Shaw, Baltimore Marathon. " In his 10 years as the elite athlete coordinator for the event — basically, he ensures that top runners come here to compete — Shaw has fitted some of the best international runners with bibs in the Baltimore Marathon.
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
When Chris Calimano crosses the finish line of the Baltimore Marathon on Saturday, he will have completed a journey much longer than 26.2 miles. The 32-year-old New York native will have run a marathon in 50 different states, a milestone that few runners achieve in a lifetime. The 50 States Marathon Club, which keeps track of those who accomplish the feat, lists less than 1,000 reported finishers since 2001. "I'm just having fun. Setting little goals and challenges," said Calimano, who ran his first marathon in 2010.
NEWS
October 14, 2005
The Baltimore Marathon will be held tomorrow. Motorists should expect delays throughout the day and are encouraged to use alternate routes.The following streets will be affected by the marathon from 7:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. Streets affected: Russell St., Camden St., Paca St., McCulloh St., McMechen St., Eutaw Place, Druid Park Lake Dr., 28th St., St. Paul St., Light St., Montgomery St., Hanover St., Fort Ave., Towson St., Marriott St., Hull St., Woodall...
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
City police and organizers of this weekend's Baltimore Running Festival say they are stepping up security after explosions shook the end of the Boston race this spring, joining other recent running events that have placed restrictions around the finish line. Baltimore's race comes as the busy fall marathon season enters full swing for the first time since the Boston attacks, and officials are trying to ensure public safety without detracting from the celebratory atmosphere that marks distance running events.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
There is more to training for a marathon than running a few laps around the track. Finishing 26.2 miles, or even getting to the starting line, takes attention to some details about eating and hydrating, miles covered, and aches and pains. Dr. John Senatore, avid runner and chief of podiatry in Union Memorial Hospital's sports medicine department, talks about what to do β€” and what not to do β€” as next week's Baltimore Running Festival approaches. What should runners, particularly first-time marathoners, do in the last week before the race so they feel good on race day?
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Erika Brannock has not been to an organized race since April, when the first of two homemade bombs near the Boston Marathon finish line so badly injured the 29-year-old Towson preschool teacher that doctors were forced to amputate her left leg above the knee. That will change Saturday, when Brannock -- who took her first steps with a prosthesis just last weekend -- serves as the official starter at the Baltimore Running Festival. The decision to participate was not a difficult one. "I immediately said, of course, that I would love to do it and it would be a huge honor," Brannock said Wednesday.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
City police and organizers of this weekend's Baltimore Running Festival say they are stepping up security after explosions shook the end of the Boston race this spring, joining other recent running events that have placed restrictions around the finish line. Baltimore's race comes as the busy fall marathon season enters full swing for the first time since the Boston attacks, and officials are trying to ensure public safety without detracting from the celebratory atmosphere that marks distance running events.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
When about 27,000 runners take over the streets Saturday for the 13th annual Baltimore Running Festival, they'll trust their training to get them through the day. But just in case spectators, residents and other visitors to the city need a hand, here's a handful of things to keep in mind on race day. When and where do the races begin? The Baltimore Marathon and team relay begin at 8 a.m. near the intersection of South Paca Street and Camden Street, followed by the 5K at 8:15 a.m. At 9:45 a.m., the half-marathon begins near the corner of Conway Street and Light Street.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Jeremy Wells would not be competing in the Baltimore Marathon Saturday had he not broken his back in a motorcyle accident last November. Now paralyzed below the waist, Wells, of Abingdon, will race in the handcycle event, perched in a three-wheeler and pedaling furiously with his hands. It's his way of flirting with normalcy, the 27-year-old paraplegic said. "Running was never my thing. I wouldn't have given this race a thought," Wells said. Then came that day in Essex when he skidded off his motorcycle at 55 miles per hour, got hit by a car and lost the use of his legs.
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Halfway up Heartbreak Hill, an iconic stretch of the Boston Marathon course, Erica Greene was stopped by race officials, having just completed her 20th mile. The news of a bombing at the finish line had traveled down the course. For a few months after that race, Greene, a teacher at Turning Point Academy in Lanham, let her running fall to the wayside. To have trained for such a long time, only to see her dream taken away, was too much. "It took me a while to even go out and do three miles after Boston," said Greene, who plans to be part of this weekend's Baltimore Running Festival and to run in Boston next year.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
Running a half-marathon is easy, Bob Gralley, 87, said: "I put one leg in front of the other. " For 13.1 miles. That Gralley can do this at his age is remarkable. Yet on Saturday, there he'll be at the 13th Baltimore Running Festival, a silver-haired methuselah plugging along beside others young enough to be his great-grandchildren. Not that they'd know it. Trim and limber, Gralley doesn't look his age, though race officials said the Parkville resident is the oldest participant entered in any of the day's events.
SPORTS
By Chris Trevino and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Running through the streets of a still slumbering city, fighting off cramps, the chill October air and the dozens of runners around him, Stephen Muange once again tasted victory in Charm City, claiming his second consecutive Baltimore Marathon championship. The Kenya native defended his 2011 title with a personal best time of 2:13:08, three seconds ahead of second-place finisher Tesfaye Alemayehu of Ethiopia. It broke the record Muange set last year for narrowest margin of victory in the men's marathon.
NEWS
October 9, 2009
If you go The Baltimore Marathon starts at Russell and Camden streets at 8 a.m. Saturday. Spectators can watch the race for free at dozens of locations along the route. For more information, go to thebaltimoremarathon.com. Street closures for 2009 Baltimore Marathon * Corner of Russell and Camden: closed at 6 a.m. for setup * Paca to McCulloh: closed from 7 to 8:30 a.m. * McCulloh to Greenspring: closed from 7:10 to 8:50 a.m. * Greenspring to Beechwood to Mansion House to Hanlon to East to Wyman Park Drive (in Druid Hill Park)
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
When Chris Calimano crosses the finish line of the Baltimore Marathon on Saturday, he will have completed a journey much longer than 26.2 miles. The 32-year-old New York native will have run a marathon in 50 different states, a milestone that few runners achieve in a lifetime. The 50 States Marathon Club, which keeps track of those who accomplish the feat, lists less than 1,000 reported finishers since 2001. "I'm just having fun. Setting little goals and challenges," said Calimano, who ran his first marathon in 2010.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
Several hundred runners readying themselves to participate in the Baltimore Running Festival in October are planning an organized training run Saturday morning. The run, which will include water stops for participants along a 10- to 20-mile loop that roughly follows the planned marathon course, is expected to begin at 7 a.m. at the Pulaski Monument in Patterson Park. Falls Road Running is coordinating the run, which is open to participants who pay a $10 registration fee. Though more than 300 runners are expected to participate, streets will not be closed and intersections will not be blocked along the course route, which runs north to Lake Montebello, then west to Druid Hill Park before turning south through downtown and out Key Highway.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.