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Eileen Ambrose | September 4, 2013
J. Wyndal Gordon, a criminal lawyer in Baltimore, says he will pay for gas - up to $15 per car - for the first 150 people as part of a community appreciation day. The gas-giveaway will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 28th - or until the limit is reached - at the Liberty Mart Gas Station. It's located on Liberty Heights and Berwin, across from the Marion C. Bascom Sr. Fire Station on Liberty Heights Ave. and Garrison Blvd., according to the firm.      
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NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
Even as the Baltimore Police Department faces criticism over its handling of an officer caught on video punching a suspect, an outside audit of the Internal Affairs Division has raised questions about the thoroughness and fairness of the agency's misconduct investigations. A Baltimore lawyer who is a national expert on police discipline discovered "many flaws" within the Internal Affairs Division, including detectives who lack proper training, work under decades-old processes and are often pulled from their duties for other tasks.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
Since Baltimore City Hall contended in a federal lawsuit last year that a group of international banks conspired to keep a key interest rate benchmark low, more municipalities and private companies have started to investigate potential losses because of the alleged scheme. Baltimore bankruptcy attorney Joel I. Sher is looking into whether banks' manipulation of Libor, the London interbank offered rate, caused a jumbo mortgage lender, Thornburg Mortgage Inc., to lose money though interest-rate swaps tied to the rate.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
Now Andrew Stephenson can go to the Ravens game Thursday night. So there's that. But after video surfaced this week of running back Ray Rice punching his fiancee unconscious, the Baltimore lawyer says, cheering the home team at M&T Bank Stadium isn't going to be the same - and probably won't be for a while. "We'll all be there, feeling a bit ashamed," said Stephenson, 39, who earlier this week appeared to be willing to forgo his share of season tickets, which his firm has held since 1996.
SPORTS
By Robbie Levin, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
In the center of Mobtown Fight Club, a small gym tucked away in an alley off Baltimore Street, Venroy July pounds a speed bag. Behind him, his trainer Adrian Davis shouts phrases of encouragement. "Yeah! Work it champ!" Eyes fixed on the flittering bag, July appears oblivious to the world around him. "Can't nobody beat you. Nobody!" July rapidly rotates his arms, his body transforming into a smooth, punching machine. "The next cruiserweight champion of the world!"
NEWS
March 18, 1992
Services for William B. Stansbury, a Baltimore lawyer who headed a number of Methodist, Masonic and civic groups, will be held at 11 a.m. today at Grace United Methodist Church, 5407 N. Charles St.Mr. Stansbury died Sunday of liver and kidney disorders at his home on Club Lane in Towson. He was 80.He was former president of the board of the Baltimore Conference of the United Methodist Church and had been its chancellor and attorney for many years.He had been president of the Arcadia Improvement Association, the Ancient and Honorable Mechanical Company of Baltimore and the Greater Northeast Baltimore Association, which sponsored Fourth of July celebrations at Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
November 1, 1990
Services for Lee R. Finnesey, a Baltimore lawyer, will be held at 9 a.m. today at Loring Byers Funeral Directors, 8728 Liberty Road in Randallstown.Mr. Finnesey, who was 60 and lived on Merrymount Drive in the Rockdale area, died Monday of cancer at St. Joseph Hospital.Born in Bridgeton, N.J., he was a 1948 graduate of Forest Park High School and served in the Marine Corps Reserve.He attended Baltimore Junior College, now the New Community College of Baltimore, and Loyola College before earning his law degree at the University of Baltimore in 1969.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | March 10, 1992
A 62-year-old Baltimore lawyer was arrested yesterday after his indictment on theft and fraud charges stemming from a yearlong investigation of false automobile insurance accident claims.The charges against attorney Nelson R. Kandel, a resident of Ruxton, were the first to arise from the investigation, targeting the practices of lawyers, doctors and other professionals with roles in the handling of insurance claims, according to the Maryland attorney general's office.A state insurance official said as many as 10 lawyers and several physicians also could face indictment in the probe -- the first major investigation of insurance fraud in the state since the mid-1970s.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2003
John George Noppinger Sr., a retired lawyer who for 50 years had a one-man business and tax law practice in downtown Baltimore, died of pneumonia Sunday at Oak Crest Village in Parkville, where he had lived for the past eight years. The former Towson resident was 90. Born in Baltimore and raised on East Lombard Street in Highlandtown, he was a graduate of City College, where he took night classes to earn his high school diploma. He then received a degree in business administration from the old Baltimore College of Commerce in 1934 and joined Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., where he became a senior accounting clerk.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2000
A Baltimore lawyer who was a former assistant federal prosecutor and one-time deputy director of the Legal Aid Bureau had his law license suspended yesterday by the Court of Appeals. Michael G. Middleton, in private practice since 1988, received a suspension of at least three years. In a 16-page opinion, the state's top judges said he was incompetent in representing several criminal defendants and he had been found in criminal contempt last November for lying to a Baltimore County judge to win a delay for a trial.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 16, 2014
A note about Jeff Yeatman: I sought him out; he did not contact me. Until I asked, he'd never given an interview about the random act of madness that occurred 15 years ago near his office in downtown Baltimore. "I actively avoided it at the time," he says, "because I resented the idea that I had to share something very fresh and awful just because other people found it interesting. " I came across his name while searching Google for articles about walking to work. This headline, from The Baltimore Sun of Feb. 3, 1999, popped up: "Lawyer wounded walking to work.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
Herbert "Hunky" Matz, a Baltimore lawyer known for his warmth and wit, died Wednesday in his sleep. He turned 100 years old in January. Relatives say his upbeat demeanor won him friends and admirers and surely contributed to his longevity. They say he was proud to be a Baltimore man, having been born and raised near Patterson Park along with nine siblings. He graduated from Baltimore City College, where he was captain of the basketball team and later inducted into the Hall of Fame and invited to be graduation speaker.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Robert R. Bowie, a lawyer who established what is now the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University, died Nov. 2 of respiratory failure at Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. He was 104. The son of Clarence Keating Bowie, a Baltimore lawyer, and Helen Richardson Bowie, a homemaker, Robert Richardson Bowie was born in Baltimore and raised on Calvert Street and in Guilford. After graduating in 1927 from the Gilman School, Mr. Bowie earned a bachelor's degree in 1931 from Princeton University and his law degree in 1934 from Harvard Law School.
NEWS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
One of Venroy July's most vivid recollections from when he was a boy growing up in Jamaica was watching boxing with his father, Venry. The November 1992 bout between Evander Holyfield and Riddick Bowe was especially memorable for the Baltimore lawyer who moonlights as a boxer. "I remember lying with him and him kind of explaining to me the rules of boxing, the scoring, the 10-9 scoring and how if you get knocked down, you get 8 [points] and just how that worked," recalled the 30-year-old July, who was 9 at the time of the heavyweight fight.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | September 4, 2013
J. Wyndal Gordon, a criminal lawyer in Baltimore, says he will pay for gas - up to $15 per car - for the first 150 people as part of a community appreciation day. The gas-giveaway will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 28th - or until the limit is reached - at the Liberty Mart Gas Station. It's located on Liberty Heights and Berwin, across from the Marion C. Bascom Sr. Fire Station on Liberty Heights Ave. and Garrison Blvd., according to the firm.      
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Nike started with running shoes and Under Armour with undershirts. Both stories begin with dissatisfaction. While trying to sell a Japanese manufacturer's shoes, Phil Knight sent some to his former coach, who modified them, using, among other things, a waffle iron. Tired of undershirts that didn't dry quickly enough beneath the pads he wore as a football player, Kevin Plank set about experimenting with new materials. In 1964, Knight hawked his goods from the trunk of a car. In 1996, Plank did the same.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2001
Time for a Johnny U-turn? After fielding criticism from associates, a Baltimore lawyer said yesterday that he will give the Internet domain name he reserved last fall, "JohnUnitas.com," to the former Colts quarterback. William M. Chaires said he asked John A. Pica, a former state senator with whom he worked on tobacco litigation, to tell Unitas Management Corp. he was willing to transfer the name to Johnny Unitas for free. Short of going to court, he would have had little choice: The National Arbitration Forum, a Minneapolis-based network of former judges, lawyers and law professors that was hearing the dispute between Unitas and Chaires, announced a ruling yesterday in favor of Unitas.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer Richard Irwin contributed to this story | March 10, 1992
A bail review hearing before a District Court judge was set today for a 62-year-old Baltimore lawyer who was indicted on theft and fraud charges stemming from a yearlong investigation of automobile insurance accident claims.A Central District Court commissioner earlier today ordered the attorney, Nelson R. Kandel, held in lieu of $25,000 bail pending today's bail review hearing. Mr. Kandel was arrested yesterday.The charges against Mr. Kandel, of Ruxton, were the first to arise from the investigation, targeting the practices of lawyers, doctors and other professionals with roles in the handling of insurance claims, according to the Maryland attorney general's office.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
The Baltimore entertainment attorney who represented White House state dinner crashers Tareq and Michaele Salahi and "The Wire" actress Felicia "Snoop" Pearson was disbarred Monday after the state's highest court found he had, among other things, overbilled clients and misused money given to him as a retainer. The Court of Appeals upheld an earlier ruling that Paul W. Gardner II had violated official standards of conduct for lawyers, and he was ordered to pay court costs. The court ruled Gardner improperly paid his office manager for legal work, though she was not an attorney, and improperly filed a nonimmigrant work visa application, resulting in its being denied.
NEWS
By Justin George and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Three police officers suffered minor injuries in a police chase that started in Northeast Baltimore and ended with a collision in the Carney area of Baltimore County. A police spokesman said the pursuit began after two officers moved to interrupt a "possible drug transaction" in the 5200 block of Belair Road. Two officers suffered "scratches and abrasions" in a collision with the suspect vehicle, and were taken to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center as a precaution. The gray Chevrolet Cobalt fled, leading officers through Northeast and Northern Baltimore, with the passenger-side door of the vehicle bent backward at one point.
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