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BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | August 19, 2011
Baltimore Housing officials issued a warning Friday about fraudulent fliers stating that the waiting list for the Housing Choice voucher program would reopen on August 22. The list for the program, commonly known as Section 8, is closed, according to a news release. The circulating fliers suggest people should bring information such as pay stubs, Social Security cards and proof of income, but the claims are not true. For more information about the waiting list, residents should call 443-984-2200.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts announced that New York-based Stephen Powers , known for his public art projects, will create a series of large-scale murals as part of a project called "Love Letter to Baltimore. " Permanent and temporary murals will appear at various locations in East Baltimore and Southwest Baltimore. The object, BOPA says, is to concentrate the murals "around high-traffic transportation corridors, visible to people on the street as well as travelers and commuters passing through Baltimore by car or train.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
One of the U.S. Senate's most aggressive watchdogs said Thursday he has begun an inquiry into Baltimore's public housing agency, after receiving calls and emails concerning "a wide range of allegations, including possible conflicts of interest, fraud, waste and abuse of taxpayers' monies. " Sen. Charles E. Grassley of Iowa, ranking Republican member of the Judiciary Committee, requested reams of documents from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, which oversees housing authorities around the country and steers millions of dollars a year to Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 4, 2014
Work has begun on the major mixed-use development downtown that is to replace the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre with two glassy apartment towers and four floors of shopping, said a spokesman for Owings Mills developer David S. Brown Enterprises LTD . The garage beneath the theater closed this month and a construction fence now surrounds the property, located at the intersection of Charles and Baltimore streets. Formal demolition could start "any day," said Larry Lichtenauer of Lawrence Howard & Associates.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | May 16, 2012
Rough economy notwithstanding, more Baltimore homes were getting face lifts at the end of the last decade than the start. That's one of the bits of intel from the newest Vital Signs , an ongoing effort by the Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance at the University of Baltimore to shine a light on how the city is changing. Statistics range from crime rates to employment rates . (City residents -- pick your neighborhood from the Vital Signs map , and you can see where things stand near you.)
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Baltimore Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano met last month with an influential state lawmaker to discuss more than $8 million in unpaid court-ordered judgments against the city's housing authority, which have resulted from lead-paint poisoning lawsuits brought by former public housing residents. But Del. Samuel I. “Sandy” Rosenberg said Graziano did not cover new ground at the June 5 meeting. “There was nothing new that I was told,” said Rosenberg, a Baltimore Democrat who is vice chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2001
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City Police Force is being evaluated by a national association of law enforcement agencies as part of the authority's efforts to retain its accreditation. The Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies sent a team of assessors during the weekend to examine the housing police's operations, management, policies and support services for three days. The housing authority's force, which polices Baltimore's public housing, was accredited for a standard three-year period by CALEA in 1997, and is seeking reaccreditation under an extension granted by the association.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | April 13, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Know when to hold 'em and know when to fold 'em, says the song. Know when to walk away, and know when to run. That's a pretty good rule, not just for poker but for business and for life. In plain unmusical prose, it means being prepared to cut your losses when necessary.Sometimes this means obeying your brain when your heart is screeching at you to stop. Not everyone can do this. In farming there are plenty of examples of those who can't -- third-generation dairymen who just can't imagine life without cows, say, or people with thin-soiled farms who stick with corn year after year as the yields steadily shrink.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | January 15, 2008
The National Association of Realtors' chief economist told local real estate agents yesterday that he believes the Baltimore housing market has hit bottom and 2008 should be a better year - assuming buyers don't sit on the sidelines, anticipating major price drops. "This area will be very interesting to watch because there's very solid economic growth, but people aren't buying homes," said Lawrence Yun, the economist. He added: "Ten years from now, people will look back at 2008 and say, `Wow, that was a great time to become a homeowner.
NEWS
By George, he's back DAN RODRICKS | February 24, 1995
Peel back the layers of water-stained wallboard and loose floor tiles, get down to the odorous core of the city's public housing scandal -- can we now officially call it that? -- and we find, if not corruption, at least incompetence. The mayor says the fast-track, no-bid process for granting repair contracts in shabby, city-owned houses was justified by an emergency in Baltimore's housing needs. "The housing situation [was] a public health threat to communities," the mayor said.Well, how did it get that way?
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
After her mother died in 2010, Sidney Allen could no longer afford the rent on the home they shared and spent the next three years bouncing between friends' couches and short-term rentals, without a home to call her own. Her homelessness ended in April, six months after meeting with a Bon Secours case worker, when she moved into a house on Smallwood Street. She pays $200 a month for it, thanks to one of 650 federal housing vouchers set aside for the homeless as part of the city's 10-year campaign to address the problem in the city.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
A troubled Reservoir Hill property that came to be known as "Murder Mall" will be demolished under an agreement that's left some residents relieved but others worried about where they'll go. Baltimore Housing officials have been trying for at least four years to oust the company that owns Madison Park North Apartments and move the residents out, but the owner brought several challenges in court. The two sides finally reached a settlement last month. Residents say they've been told they have four months to find places to live, and city officials said the 202-unit complex would be razed 10 months after the last tenant leaves.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Hundreds more problem properties in Baltimore are finding new buyers as the city steps up the use of decades-old law designed to root out negligent owners. The law, which community groups pioneered in the early 1990s, allows property owners to be sued for code violations and lose their buildings if they fail to make repairs. But until recently, transferring homes to new owners through a court-appointed receiver happened in just a few dozen cases each year. Now as part of its Vacants to Value initiative, the city is putting more focus on the law, swelling the auction lists.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
A resident and a firefighter suffered minor injuries in a fire in a Northeast Baltimore duplex early Tuesday morning, fire officials said. The fire broke out shortly before 2 a.m. in the 5900 block of Cedonia Ave. in the Cedmont neighborhood and was called under control about 40 minutes later. Both injured people were taken to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, where they are expected to recover. The cause of the fire is under investigation. cwells@baltsun.com twitter.com/cwellssun
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Like the sound of a Greek Revival mansion with an "amazing view"? Want to own a "piece of Baltimore history"? Willing to look beyond a "scarred exterior"? Baltimore Housing has launched a marketing campaign for a select group of so-called "eclectic" properties owned by the city, in an effort to highlight the value hidden in the sea of roughly 1,000 vacant buildings it has listed for sale. The 18 sites, drawn from across the city, include the 1838 Upton Mansion, two former schools, two firehouses, a brick warehouse, and a one-time library, as well as some vacant lots open for new construction and several blocks of rowhouses traditionally associated with the Vacants to Value program.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Janice Jacobs-Hudson keeps informed about what goes on in the East Baltimore neighborhood of rowhouses where she has lived for more than 30 years. So Jacobs-Hudson, president of the Ashland Avenue Association, was surprised to find an artist painting a gigantic "pop-up" mural on a stretch of houses in the 2400 block of E. Eager St., including the house where she grew up. The houses, which are boarded up and vacant, are scheduled to be torn down over the next several months for a children's park.
NEWS
February 12, 1996
THE CITY COUNCIL should use the Feb. 14 reconfirmation hearing of Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III as an occasion to thoroughly assess Baltimore's housing situation under the eight years of the Schmoke administration. And if it votes to give Mr. Henson another appointment, the council should establish clear performance goals for him to meet.Three years ago, when Mr. Henson was drafted by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to take over the troubled twin housing bureaucracies, the developer did so reluctantly.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
Kenneth Strong, director of research for a nonprofit law center in Baltimore devoted to helping community organizations, started a new job with the city yesterday as director of the office of homeownership. Strong, who will try to encourage homeownership through loan programs and promotional efforts to persuade more people to live in the city, was one of five housing department hires announced during a news conference yesterday at City Hall. Other incoming housing officials introduced by the mayor yesterday included Douglass Austin, deputy commissioner for development; J. Gregory Love, deputy commissioner for housing and building code enforcement; Ruth Louie, assistant commissioner for community development; and Chris Shea, associate deputy director of planning and development.
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Two cases of Legionnaires' disease have been confirmed at a senior housing complex in East Baltimore, city health officials said Friday. A pair of residents at the 149-unit Apostolic Towers Apartments at 201 N. Washington St. tested positive for the bacteria that cause Legionnaires', city health officials said. One case occurred in March and the other this week; the residents were hospitalized. One person remains in the hospital with pneumonia. Health officials said two cases are considered a "cluster," leading them to test the water system in the building and warn residents not to shower or use the tap. Bottled water has been provided for drinking and cooking.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
For years, the city has fought blight with excavators, clawing down abandoned and decrepit buildings. This month, it started to attack its vacant home problem by hand, signing off on a plan to take apart a selection of houses brick by brick. Proponents say the program will be able to pay for the added labor expense by selling the salvaged materials, especially Baltimore's iconic red brick. They believe the venture will help turn the city's multimillion-dollar demolition program into an environmentally friendly job creator, without costing much more than a typical tear-down.
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