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NEWS
April 10, 2012
What do tourists seek out when visiting a city? Sites that are unique and distinctive. Baltimore has a wealth of such notable landmarks well beyond the 15 earmarked for reevaluation and reappraisal by MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake. These significant structures, evidence of Baltimore's rich heritage, should be both preserved and promoted to students and the public-at-large, to instill pride in and knowledge about our city and its history. If given the restoration, recognition and publicity they deserve, these grand buildings could reap a greater economic benefit than the controversial Baltimore Grand Prix.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
City officials are expected to approve a lease agreement Wednesday with a nonprofit to renovate and reopen the former Peale Museum with a cafe, library and learning center dedicated to the city's history and architecture. The Board of Estimates will vote whether to grant a three-year lease of the building to the Peale Center for Baltimore History and Architecture for $1. The old museum, near City Hall on North Holliday Street, has been vacant since 1997. The nonprofit is working to raise $4 million for the project.
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NEWS
December 21, 2009
1 Feb. 15-18, 2003 28.2 inches 2 Jan. 27-29, 1922 26.5 inches 3 Feb. 11, 1983 22.8 inches 4 Jan. 7-8, 1996 22.5 inches 5 March 29-30, 1942 22 inches 6 Feb. 11-14, 1899 21.4 inches 7 Dec. 18-19, 2009 21.1 inches 8 Feb. 18-19, 1979 20 inches 9 March 15-18, 1892 16 inches 10 Feb. 15, 1958 15.5 inches
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
More than a million visitors were expected to land in Baltimore this past week to commemorate the bicentennial of the writing of "The Star-Spangled Banner," many of them from out of state and in need of a place to stay. Across the city, hotels have pushed deals and patriotic specials, leaned on their staffs to memorize long lists of Star-Spangled Spectacular events, and brushed up on their own place in Baltimore history in an attempt to lure the War of 1812 buffs streaming into town.
NEWS
By Matthew Crenson | January 13, 1992
THE BALTIMORE BOOK: NEW VIEWS OF LOCAL HISTORY. Edited by Elizabeth Fee, Linda Shopes and Linda Zeidman. Temple University Press. 208 pages. $29.95. FOR AN awfully long time now, Baltimoreans have felt that they had less history than other cities. History -- really Big History -- always seemed to happen someplace else. When America's founders and framers had Big Ideas to get off their chests, they went, unaccountably, to Philadelphia.Washington had presidents. New York had Wall Street. Boston had Paul Revere, Puritans and the Adams family.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 3, 1992
Almost every building in downtown Baltimore bears the signature of a Swiss surveyor and mapmaker.Simon Jonas Martenet was a fastidious draftsman and a genius at establishing razor-perfect property lines. The land surveying firm he founded in 1849 is considered by many to be the final word on who owns what.Housed in a roomy South Baltimore office, S.J. Martenet & Co. is a kind of combination U.S. Supreme Court and Smithsonian Institution of Baltimore's boundaries. Its voluminous records, which survived the 1904 Baltimore Fire, pinpoint everything from the first pile driven at Memorial Stadium to home plate at the old Oriole Park on 29th Street.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2002
For five years, Baltimore has gone without a museum to house its historical photographs, prints and memorabilia. But yesterday, the fledgling Baltimore City Historical Society swung open the doors of the last building to hold that distinction, the Peale Museum, allowing history buffs, preservationists and city enthusiasts to reminisce and to ruminate on the possibilities for the 189-year-old structure. "Above all, it is the symbol of Baltimore history - the symbol - and it needs to be maintained," said retired Baltimore Circuit Judge John Carroll Byrnes, founding president of the city's 18-month-old historical society.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2005
The tale of Mary Pickersgill, the hardworking Baltimore seamstress who made the Star-Spangled Banner in 1814, will soon be told in signs outside her East Pratt Street house in 17 different languages. Following in Boston's Freedom Trail footsteps, Mayor Martin O'Malley unveiled a new Heritage Walk yesterday on the Inner Harbor promenade, near the trailhead of a 5-kilometer Baltimore history lesson that will be installed over the summer. O'Malley said the path would enable city dwellers and visitors to connect dots in a tapestry of time spanning four centuries.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | May 24, 2007
Eleanor Betty Hirsh, an educator who championed preservation of the Lloyd Street Synagogue and was a founder of the Jewish Historical Society, died of cancer Sunday at her Pikesville home. She was 83. Born Eleanor Betty Rosenthal in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington, she was a 1940 graduate of Forest Park High School and earned a bachelor's degree in education from Goucher College. She was known by her initials, E.B. She joined Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, and in 1975 became the second woman to serve as its president.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | March 27, 1999
AS I SAT in a pew at Old St. Paul's Church at Saratoga and Charles streets and glanced at the exquisite English-made stained-glass windows her family had donated there in the 1880s, I couldn't help but think what an exceptional Baltimore life Eleanor Miles led in the 96 years that ended last week.It was fitting that her funeral was at this venerable altar. She had been the friend of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. She had entertained Richard and Pat Nixon in Baltimore; she could tell a story about the city with the best of them.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
The wonderful McKeldin Fountain at Baltimore's Inner Harbor was running beautifully recently. The site was clean thanks to a team of workers, and there were several families there enjoying this important architectural landmark with its bridges, waterfalls, sculpture and passageways. I can't understand why The Sun is refusing to cover the controversy over losing such an important structure. The city plans to remove this piece of Baltimore history to replace it with nothing but grass.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
I just saw a commercial for pulled pork pizza from Papa John's. Can anyone confirm whether that is worth eating? I feel like it's a great idea, but the execution needs to be there. In return for your assistance, I will compile the day's local sports headlines in the Coffee Companion, as I do most days but did not do yesterday. - Manny Machado provided his first bit of Orioles Magic last night, getting his first walk-off hit in the form of a 12th-inning home run in a 7-6 win over the Angels . I wish he would have pimped it a little more, but that's just me. It's a typical Orioles win, if you think back to 2012, but Dan Connolly believes this team is better than that one . - There was plenty of off-field news, including a wild Hollywood Reporter article about the dispute over MASN money that could have huge long-term affects on the organization, and some trade deadline notes.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
1778: Rembrandt Peale is born. 1801: Mastodon skeleton is excavated on a New York farm. Later will be Peale's opening attraction. 1814: The Museum and Gallery of Find Arts opens at 225 N. Holliday St. in Baltimore. Grand opening is about a month before the British attack on Fort McHenry. 1816: One of Rembrandt Peale's galleries is lit with gas lamps. Peale soon helps found the Gas Light Co. of Baltimore. 1822: A brother, Rubens Peale, takes over museum operations, bringing in live animals.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
In the shadow of Baltimore's City Hall is a 200-year-old building that has been the seat of city government, a school for African-American children and a museum that displayed a mastodon skeleton and the embalmed head of a New Zealand native. Now, a fledgling nonprofit is looking to reinvent the space once again. Organizers want to transform the old Peale Museum into a hub celebrating Baltimore history and architecture with exhibits, a cafe, a lecture hall and office space. But the Peale - closed since 1997 - is in bad shape.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
In the midst of sorting a mound of yellowed newspapers in the hot attic of a century-old building in Mount Vernon, Arnie VandeBrake would occasionally pause, caught up by letters from the volatile early days of the gay rights movement. "The correspondence would be so poignant, it would feel like a disservice just to put it down and not understand what it meant," said VandeBrake, 30. As the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore prepares to relocate this fall after more than 30 years at its West Chase Street headquarters, a small group of volunteers is working to compile, catalog and preserve records they say highlight the history of the center and the trajectory of the nation through a time of rapid changes.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | September 13, 2013
While Baltimore's development community was focused on the City Council vote on Harbor Point this week, a crew of test-boring workers set up equipment at the corner of Charles and Read streets in Mount Vernon. They fired up a derrick and drilled down through the asphalt to see if a new eight-story apartment building could rise just a couple of blocks from the Washington Monument. If this one gets built — and there have been unkept promises at Charles and Read before — an unattractive, gap-toothed hole in the neighborhood would be filled with what promises to be a stylish apartment house with an expansive view on Baltimore history.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 6, 2010
Daniel Randall Beirne, a West Pointer and retired Army officer who later had a second career as a University of Baltimore professor of sociology and history and was considered an authority on Baltimore history, died Wednesday of heart failure at his East Lake Avenue home. He was 85. Dr. Beirne, whose parents were both writers, was born in Baltimore and raised on Berwick Road in Ruxton. His father was Francis Foulke Beirne, the longtime Sun and Evening Sun editorial writer, whose Christopher Billopp columns entertained newspaper readers for decades.
NEWS
March 25, 2012
We are nearing the 14th anniversary of the closing of the Peale Museum, when Baltimore became one of the few historic cities in the world without its own history center. Also lost to the public - although carefully preserved by the Maryland Historical Society - was the entire treasury of local history formerly displayed and accessible at the Peale, which was rightly regarded as "Baltimore's Smithsonian. " The good news is that MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakerecently announced that her administration intends to give greater recognition to Baltimore history as a critical element of its economic development and cultural enrichment strategy.
FEATURES
By Catherine Mallette | July 24, 2013
If you're looking for a fun way to get your kid a little more interested in Maryland history, add “Calvert the Raven in The Battle of Baltimore” to your home library. The story, by Jonathon Scott Fuqua, who has called Baltimore home for 22 years, is about a boy named Daniel who writes a truly appalling paper for school about the Battle of 1812, on the top of which his teacher has penned one word: “Terrible.” As Daniel walks home from school worrying about what his parents will say, down flies a talking raven named Calvert, who time-travels with Daniel (who is suddenly small enough to ride on the bird's back)
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2013
Hundreds of residents have been relocated and dozens of homes cleared from Baltimore's Middle East neighborhood in recent years. Now the area just north of Johns Hopkins Hospital may be losing something more: its name. As an ambitious redevelopment project with biotech research labs, corporate offices and homes reshapes the neighborhood, the area is being marketed around the yet-to-be-built Eager Park - a strategy that upsets some longtime residents. "They want it to sound like there's no history here until they got here," said Donald Gresham, a leader of the now-defunct Save Middle East Action Committee, created more than a decade ago to oppose the displacement of residents.
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