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By Sloane Brown | July 30, 2000
When an organization promotes the preservation of Baltimore's historical architecture, you can bet its annual meeting and awards dinner will be held in one of the city's architectural treasures. This year the site for the Baltimore Heritage Inc. confab was the gem of 10 Light Street, Baltimore's only art deco skyscraper. "Isn't this a great room?" Bill Pencek exclaimed, as the group's past president surveyed the majestic main banking floor of the building now owned by Bank of America. Elegantly carved columns, wall murals and ornate metalwork circled the room.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
If an English country squire or a wealthy industrialist of the Gilded Age were to have an in-town home, 106 E. Chase St. would fit the bill to a tee. Built in the 1880s, the detached, three-story Romanesque-style home fits well among the other elegant residences in Mount Vernon. "This house is one-of-a-kind and irreplaceable," said listing agent Julie Canard of Long & Foster Real Estate. "There is no way you could duplicate this, for millions of dollars. " The home's original owner, George Jenkins, was enamored of the skill and craftsmanship of builders who emigrated from Europe.
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
Baltimore City Hall. The Hippodrome Theatre. Lloyd Street Synagogue. The Scottish Rite Temple. The Garrett-Jacobs Mansion. Those are just a few of the landmarks that might not be part of Maryland's landscape if it weren't for Baltimore Heritage, an advocacy group that works to protect and promote Baltimore's historically and architecturally significant buildings, places and neighborhoods. This spring the organization is marking the 50th anniversary of its founding with an awards gala at the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion on June 11, tours of local landmarks, citations to "centennial" families that have lived in the same house for more than 100 years, and other events designed to appeal to the "inner preservationist" in everyone.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
When Samuel Smith, major general of the Maryland militia, needed a headquarters to plot Baltimore's defense from British invaders in the summer of 1814, archaeologists believe he called on the owner of a shop that gives Butcher's Hill its name. Jacob Laudenslager leased much of what is Patterson Park today from landowner William Patterson, including a butcher's shop steps from where the park's iconic pagoda sits today. Archaeologists have uncovered a wall of that structure as they embark on a dig for a better understanding of what happened when thousands of militiamen camped along the hills of southeast Baltimore during the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | February 6, 2007
Baltimore Heritage dropped yesterday its fierce two-month battle to save a row of historic downtown houses, clearing the way for Mercy Medical Center's $292 million expansion and exposing divisions among preservation advocates. Officials with the preservation group lamented losing the 1820s-era homes - particularly so soon after their fight to save the 100-year-old Rochambeau apartment building ended badly. However, they said they had to pull the plug on what was becoming a costly, time-consuming and, perhaps, ultimately pointless exercise.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | July 7, 2003
The handsome brick building at 607 Pennsylvania Ave. in West Baltimore has a proud history: It was the first integrated seminary in America, home of the religious order known as St. Joseph's Society for the Sacred Heart, or the American Josephites. After a $4.9 million renovation, it also has a promising future. It recently reopened as Charles R. Uncles Senior Plaza, a 47-unit apartment complex for seniors. It's named after a Baltimore native who was the first African-American priest to get his ecclesiastical training in the United States.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
William Boulton "Bo" Kelly Jr., a Baltimore architect, preservationist and civic leader who founded Baltimore Heritage and helped establish the Baltimore's Commission for Historical & Architectural Preservation, died Wednesday at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson of complications from an infection. The longtime Ruxton resident was 84. "Bo was a person who had an indomitable spirit and was also one of those wonderful characters you meet in life," said Walter G. Schamu, a partner in the firm of Schamu, Machowski, Grego Architects and a longtime friend.
NEWS
By Johns W. Hopkins | April 3, 2012
What is the future for Baltimore's city-owned historic properties? The Baltimore Sun has reported that Baltimore City is hiring an appraisal firm to determine the "market value" of 15 city-owned historic properties. Baltimore Heritage has asked MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakeand the director of the Department of General Services to make this process open and participatory to ensure that there is a seat at the table for the many citizens and volunteers who for decades have protected and celebrated these important landmarks.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2000
WHEN NEW owners purchased the Samester Apartments in Northwest Baltimore in 1998, they could have wiped away many of the Art Deco touches that make the building so unusual. Instead, after consulting with their architects, the owners restored details that help distinguish the 1939 apartment complex from many others up and down Park Heights Avenue, such as bull-nose columns and glass-block windows. Today, it stands as the most fully developed (and restored) Art Deco-style garden apartment complex in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2011
In January 1955, Morgan State College students staged an impromptu sit-in at the lunch counter of the Read's drugstore at Howard and Lexington streets in Baltimore, demanding that African-Americans be served. Their protest, along with others at local Read's stores, worked: That month, the retail chain began serving all patrons, black and white, at all of its 37 Baltimore-area lunch counters. But the students' victory has been largely overlooked in the annals of U.S. civil rights history, in part because it was not photographed or widely reported by the mainstream news media.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Archaeologists conducting a dig in Patterson Park are holding an open house Saturday to share discoveries with the community. The project, organized by nonprofit Baltimore Heritage, is exploring an area in the northwest corner of the park, near the Pagoda, to unearth remnants of a War of 1812 camp there. The archaeologists will hold volunteer training from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. for those interested in participating in the dig, which began Wednesday and runs through May 15. They will be answering questions and showcasing findings from 9 a.m. to noon.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
In one of the city's first historic preservation battles, Baltimore residents paid $17,000 in 1924 to save the soaring Phoenix Shot Tower from a wrecking ball and a future as a Union Oil Company gas station. Today, preservationists are again rallying around the Shot Tower. While it is no longer in danger - the city has abandoned a 2012 proposal to consider selling more than a dozen historic properties, including the tower - they say more needs to be done to showcase the attraction and to fully restore what was once the nation's tallest building.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
It is unclear why Dan Rodricks would insult historic preservationists by dismissing our efforts in 1988-1989 to save the beloved, completely reusable McCormick building as "ridiculous and quaint" ( "Investment in Baltimore, beyond our expectations," April 15). How does the prospect of a repurposed McCormick building differ from the reuse of the Baltimore Trust Company he then lauds a few paragraphs down? His assertion that preservationists advocated retaining McCormick as a vacant building is a total invention to suit his purpose, whatever that might be. Adaptive reuse was already common practice 25 years ago, even an expectation when possible.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2014
Today it's best known for the pagoda, summertime jazz concerts and some of the city's best sledding. But an archaeological dig planned for Patterson Park's Hampstead Hill seeks to revive a largely forgotten 200-year-old story. While most know Fort McHenry's role in the Battle of Baltimore, thanks to Francis Scott Key and "The Star-Spangled Banner," few know or remember what transpired on the hill overlooking the harbor. Buried there could lie remnants of the trenches that helped Baltimore fend off advancing British land forces and end the War of 1812.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 12, 2013
A thorough housecleaning of Clifton Mansion has revealed the potential inside this Northeast Baltimore treasure, marking the beginning of a long-overdue, $7 million restoration. Even now, in its early state, you could charge admission. I toured the place, the centerpiece of a city park, I had visited on numerous previous occasions and felt as if I had stepped inside for the first time. I experienced Clifton's grandeur, observed an emerging architectural pedigree and realized its potential.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
Karen Lewand, a preservationist and educator who launched a series of walking tours while establishing programs for children to learn about architecture, died of cancer Dec. 20 at her home in the Radnor-Winston section of North Baltimore. She was 67. "She was an innovator, a leader and a strong advocate for preserving Baltimore's historic buildings and neighborhoods, and helped Baltimore grow in countless ways. With an unwavering voice for preserving the best of our architecture and neighborhoods, she was instrumental in saving historic places that many of us now take for granted," said Johns Hopkins, executive director of Baltimore Heritage.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Archaeologists conducting a dig in Patterson Park are holding an open house Saturday to share discoveries with the community. The project, organized by nonprofit Baltimore Heritage, is exploring an area in the northwest corner of the park, near the Pagoda, to unearth remnants of a War of 1812 camp there. The archaeologists will hold volunteer training from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. for those interested in participating in the dig, which began Wednesday and runs through May 15. They will be answering questions and showcasing findings from 9 a.m. to noon.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun Reporter | January 25, 2007
Encouraged by recent negotiations, Baltimore preservationists have agreed to postpone a challenge of Mercy Medical Center's permit to demolish a row of historic downtown rowhomes. Baltimore Heritage, after meeting with hospital representatives this week, decided yesterday to postpone a hearing set for Tuesday asking the city to reconsider Mercy's demolition permit. The hearing has been rescheduled for Feb. 6. "These meetings have been helpful," Mercy's attorney, David W. Kinkopf, wrote in a joint statement with Baltimore Heritage's attorney, John Denick.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation decided not to vote on the ouster of the commission's executive director Monday. During a closed-door meeting, the commission opted not to take a vote on the removal of Kathleen Kotarba because "no action was requested of us," said a member of the commission who declined to be named because personnel discussions are confidential. Public notice of the meeting was made less than a week ago. It is not clear who in Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration initiated the meeting to discuss Kotarba's job performance.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Members of Baltimore's historic preservation commission have been summoned to a closed-door meeting Monday at which, some preservationists say, the board members will be asked to oust the commission's director. Board members and preservationists say efforts are under way to remove Kathleen Kotarba, who has served for decades as the executive director of the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation. "We heard from multiple folks that the closed session was going to be to take a vote to fire Kathleen Kotarba," said Eli Pousson, field officer for Baltimore Heritage, a nonprofit group that closely monitors the commission.
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