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Tim Wheeler | October 15, 2013
Baltimore's harbor may be too funky for swimming or fishing, but maybe a little gardening can help. Students from two city schools and some adult volunteers gathered at the National Aquarium Tuesday to "plant" some oysters in the Inner Harbor - not for eating but to try to improve the health of the ailing water body. "This is the first time anyone has tried planting this number of oysters in the Inner Harbor," said Adam Lindquist, coordinator of the Healthy Harbor campaign, an ambitious initiative aimed at making the Northwest and Middle branches of the Patapsco River swimmable and fishable by 2020.
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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The Scunny Memorial Paddle, which ran from Sept. 16 to 21, turned out to be even less fun than Christopher Furst, a marketing director for Power Plant Live, thought it would be. And the novice kayaker didn't go in expecting the 175-mile kayak trip was going to be a day at the beach. "In all honesty, it was the hardest thing I've ever done in my life. I've played every sport, baseball, football," Furst said, "but this was sheer endurance, paddling eight hours a day in an uncomfortable position.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
A body was located in the Baltimore Harbor near Canton on Wednesday evening, according to city police. About 6:43 p.m., a police marine unit was dispatched to the water near the intersection of Boston and Leakin streets for reports of a body. Police are investigating the discovery as a suspicious death, said Detective Nicole Monroe, a police spokeswoman. A cause of death will be determined by the medical examiner, and the person has not been identified. No further information was immediately available.
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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Baltimore County Police reported a crash in Towson at Goucher College Drive and Locustvale Road at 8:58 a.m. on Monday. Northbound Dulaney Valley Road is shut down at Fairmont Avenue, police said. The state Department of Transportation reported a disabled vehicle on Interstate 83 South at the Edmondson Avenue exit at 9:03 a.m. No additional information was given. The Maryland Transportation Authority said that this week's Star-Spangled Spectacular, slated for the Baltimore Harbor and Fort McHenry on Sept.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Baltimore's harbor earned a failing grade for water quality in the latest assessment of its ecological health, despite fewer reported sewage overflows last year. Though the harbor's overall grade for 2013, to be released Wednesday, is down from a C-minus the year before, the city's signature water body didn't actually get more polluted last year, according to organizers of the Healthy Harbor campaign. Instead, the harbor campaigners said they've just decided to stop grading on a curve and deliver a more straightforward assessment - that it's far from safe to swim or splash around in the trash- and sewage-fouled upper reaches of the Patapsco River.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 8, 2012
The source of the sewer smell many noticed in Baltimore harbor this week remains a mystery, as city officials say an extensive search has found no evidence of a sewage spill or overflow, despite high bacteria levels in water samples taken by an environmental group. Tina Meyers, the Harbor Waterkeeper , said that water samples taken Tuesday by Blue Water Baltimore , the local watershed watchdog of which she is a part, found elevated bacteria levels in two places in the harbor - in front of Pier 6 and in the deep shipping channel by the Domino sugar refinery.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
The body of a male between 15 and 20 years old was found in Baltimore's Inner Harbor early Sunday morning, police and fire officials reported. Emergency responders, including divers with the city's fire department and city police officers, responded to 301 Light St. at about 3:15 a.m. after a caller reported a body in the water, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a fire spokesman. Divers entered the water near the Inner Harbor's promenade and discovered the body, Cartwright said. The operation, which was not a rescue but a recovery effort, took until about 4 a.m., Cartwright said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2004
Baltimore's sprawling harbor and miles of Patapsco River shoreline have been the scene of emergencies, near escapes and outright tragedy. Baltimore's fireboats handle an average of 97 calls a year, most during the summer. A smaller vessel, Fire Rescue 1, a speedboat used for medical emergencies, responds to an average of 113 calls a year, according to official figures. Historians of the Great Baltimore Fire noted that the city's fireboats helped check the path of flames on Feb. 8, 1904 as flames reached a natural barrier at the Jones Falls.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2010
The state has made a rare binding pledge to offset whatever pollution it may cause by depositing the muck it dredges from Baltimore harbor in a cove south of downtown. Bowing to concerns raised by environmentalists, the state Department of the Environment is requiring the Maryland Port Administration to limit or make up for the nitrogen and phosphorus expected to drain back into the Patapsco River from the dredged material to be placed in Masonville Cove. The port administration has spent $153 million to clean up trash and debris in the cove area and build an environmental education center there.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Masonville Cove , a reclaimed stretch of South Baltimore's industrial waterfront, has earned a new distinction -- the nation's first "urban wildlife refuge partnership. " U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe was to announce the designation Thursday morning at the 11-acre nature area that's been developed by the Maryland Port Administration in a formerly abandoned and contaminated stretch of Baltimore's harbor. It's not a federal takeover, but the beginning of a new cooperative effort by the wildlife service to instill conservation values in urban residents, especially youth.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 22, 2014
Ever wonder what a sewer "overflow" looks like?  This video by the Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper shows what happened in multiple places in Baltimore during the near-record downpour of Aug. 12, when six inches of rain fell in a 12-hour time span. That's diluted but raw, untreated sewage spewing out of manhole covers and spraying pedestrians as vehicles pass through it.  The Baltimore city Department of Public Works reported more than 3 million gallons of sewage overflowed from the Patapsco River wastewater treatment plant and in the 1900 block of Falls Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Singer-songwriter Melissa Etheridge, country legend Kenny Rogers and rock group Train have been added to the talent lineup for Sept. 13's Star-Spangled Spectacular concert at Pier Six Pavilion. Also just announced: singer Jordin Sparks will join John Lithgow to co-host the event. The Star-Spangled Spectacular concert -- a celebration of the bicentennial of our national anthem to be televised live as part of PBS' "Great Performances" series -- also features performances by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Broadway star Kristin Chenoweth, country group Little Big Town, a cappella group Pentatonix, Motown legend Smokey Robinson, mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves-Montgomery and performers from the off-Broadway show "Stomp.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 15, 2014
First, let me acknowledge the following: The Baltimore harbor is still too polluted, too many Baltimoreans still throw too much trash in the street; we need better results from the city's public schools and more involved parents of school-age kids; we need to lower property taxes; we need to better support city businesses; we need to foster healthy morale and principled duty among teachers, firefighters and police officers, and they need to be adequately...
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Wednesday is Baltimore's 285th birthday. Or is it? A quick Google search declares July 30, 1729, as the day the city was founded. That's when the colonial assembly of Maryland passed the bill that established Baltimore as a town. But historians such as Fred Shoken say deciding what day to celebrate the city's birth isn't so simple. "It's sort of like, take your pick," Shoken said. The native Baltimorean, who works as a historic preservation consultant, said he prefers Aug. 8. That's when Gov. Benedict Leonard Calvert signed the bill into law. Some also might consider Dec. 31, 1796, the date the city was incorporated, or maybe even Jan. 12, 1730, when surveyors laid out the town.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
For the first time in about a decade, outdoor ice skating could return to the Inner Harbor with the creation of a temporary rink at McKeldin Square. Baltimore's spending panel approved an agreement Wednesday with the Waterfront Partnership, which hopes a temporary rink will bring more city residents and visitors to the harbor during the slower winter months. But the nonprofit must raise $250,000 by Labor Day to pull off the plans. Other efforts to revive skating at the harbor have failed since an outdoor rink at Rash Field in Federal Hill was closed when its aging equipment could not keep the ice cold enough.
NEWS
June 13, 2014
It is very disturbing news to read in The Sun that the Citizen's Promenade walking area in Fells Point will be done away with by a decision coming from the Board of Estimates this coming Wednesday without any consultation with the Promenade Committee ( "Kevin Plank's Recreation Pier hotel plan moves forward," June 9). We know what the vote will be 3-to-2 because Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake controls the board and she always gets her way when it comes to "money over citizens.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
No evidence of foul play has been found in the death of Elizabeth "Liz" O'Hearn — the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine neurology professor found unresponsive in the Baltimore harbor last week — and it will not be ruled a homicide, according to city police. O'Hearn, 53, an accomplished neurologist who broke ground in the field of neurodegenerative disease and joined the medical school's faculty in 1997, was found unresponsive in the water near her Canton home in the 2300 block of Boston Street about 4:45 a.m. Thursday.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Baltimore police deployed extra officers around Digital Harbor High School in Federal Hill and a handful of other schools this week to ensure students' safety in the wake of recent threats and violent attacks against Latino students. The beefed-up security presence appears to have calmed a situation that was threatening to get out of hand after all but seven of the Digital Harbor's more than 100 Latino students stayed home last Friday because they feared being attacked by black students on the streets near the school.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Baltimore's harbor earned a failing grade for water quality in the latest assessment of its ecological health, despite fewer reported sewage overflows last year. Though the harbor's overall grade for 2013, to be released Wednesday, is down from a C-minus the year before, the city's signature water body didn't actually get more polluted last year, according to organizers of the Healthy Harbor campaign. Instead, the harbor campaigners said they've just decided to stop grading on a curve and deliver a more straightforward assessment - that it's far from safe to swim or splash around in the trash- and sewage-fouled upper reaches of the Patapsco River.
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