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By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A Baltimore-based organization dedicated to improving children's health by bettering their homes received a $1 million grant Wednesday to launch projects across the country to benefit low-income children suffering from asthma. The Green & Healthy Homes Initiative will work with the Calvert Foundation on this effort that got the $1 million boost from the Social Innovation Fund, run by the Corporation for National and Community Service. The grant pays to launch a project that will eventually include work on homes in five regions of the country that have not yet been chosen, but which have a high incidence of children hospitalized for treatment of asthma.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A Baltimore-based organization dedicated to improving children's health by bettering their homes received a $1 million grant Wednesday to launch projects across the country to benefit low-income children suffering from asthma. The Green & Healthy Homes Initiative will work with the Calvert Foundation on this effort that got the $1 million boost from the Social Innovation Fund, run by the Corporation for National and Community Service. The grant pays to launch a project that will eventually include work on homes in five regions of the country that have not yet been chosen, but which have a high incidence of children hospitalized for treatment of asthma.
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | November 27, 2012
Today is the first Giving Tuesday, a national event that encourages charitable donations and hopes to become as popular as Black Friday and Cyber Monday. GiveCorps.com is a Baltimore nonprofit crowdfunding program that is helping donors to maximize their giving today through a matching program. It has more than 50 Baltimore nonprofits trying to raise money on its site . These nonprofits include Real Food Farm, Maryland SPCA, Living Classrooms Foundation, Child First Authority and Athletes Serving Athletes.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
He'd been leader of a New Jersey social justice organization since 2008, making inroads on housing and employment issues, when Cornell Brooks, a soft-spoken lawyer and minister, got an opportunity he didn't see coming. The NAACP, a national organization based in Northwest Baltimore, was looking for a new president. A search committee wanted to talk. He had to decide whether to seek the job as successor to the charming, sometimes controversial Ben Jealous.  A friend remembers telling the 53-year-old Brooks that it might be hard to handle the competing factions within the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, which has a famously unwieldy 64-person board, hundreds of local branches and periodic financial problems.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2012
Chad and Meredith Spence live in Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood, where the lights barely flickered during Superstorm Sandy. But Meredith Spence grew up in Lacey Township, N.J., a community near the coast that was hit hard by the late-October storm. As a child, she spent many summer days at the beach resort town of Seaside Heights, strolling boardwalks and riding roller coasters that have been heavily damaged. "When we saw this devastation, she was obviously very affected by it and very saddened," said Chad Spence.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2003
The civil war in Liberia has left thousands of children without parents, and a Baltimore group with ties to that violence-torn nation hopes to raise enough money to build an orphanage for youngsters there. The effort begins today with several events at the Gaimei N.N. Woah-Tee Neighborhood Center on York Road, said J. Mamadee Woah-Tee, a Baltimore resident who last visited his native Liberia in 1995. Woah-Tee, an organizer of today's fund-raising activities, said as many as 3,000 children could benefit from an orphanage in Bong County, Liberia.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Andrea Walker and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Andrea Walker,sun reporters | October 27, 2006
A group of prominent Baltimore business and civic leaders has launched an effort to buy The Baltimore Sun Co., sending a letter yesterday indicating its interest to the company's Chicago parent. Theodore G. Venetoulis, a former Baltimore County executive who lost a Democratic primary bid for governor in 1978, said he wrote Tribune Co. yesterday afternoon on behalf of the newly formed Baltimore Media Group. His letter expresses "strong interest" in acquiring The Sun and other assets held by The Baltimore Sun Co. Venetoulis chairs the group, which includes Abell Foundation President Robert C. Embry Jr. and longtime civic leader Walter Sondheim.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 12, 1995
Over the years, critics have put forth all sorts of theories about when and where rock and roll began. Some have suggested that the big moment took place in Philadelphia in 1952, when Bill Haley and the Comets knocked out "Rock This Joint." Others will argue that it was Jackie Brentson's "Rocket 88," recorded on Jan. 8, 1951, in Memphis. Then there are those who would point to Roy Brown's "Rockin' at Midnight," cut in New Orleans in January of '49.But there are an awful lot of people who will insist that rock and roll really began in Baltimore, with a quintet called the Orioles.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2003
A group of area men accused of using nightclubs as fronts for a violent, well-organized drug ring go on trial this week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, charged under rarely used racketeering laws that helped bring down Mafia figures in other cities. Federal authorities say the Baltimore group, run by two convicted heroin dealers whose ties go back more than a decade, reached well beyond drug dealing into arson, witness tampering and attempted murder. An indictment charges that the group was responsible for arsons that destroyed two nightclubs -- one as part of an insurance fraud scheme in 2001 at the group's former operation's base, Strawberry's 5000 in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Joe Nawrozki and Raymond L. Sanchez and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff | December 10, 1991
An illegal Baltimore-based organization that allegedly trafficked in millions of dollars of cocaine has been shattered by the FBI, city and county police, the city state's attorney announced today.Five suspects have been arrested and were to face a preliminary hearing today in Baltimore Circuit Court. Others in the metropolitan area are expected to be charged in the 27 indictments handed up last Friday.Arrested were Linden Martin, 32, of the first block of Waldmann Mill Court; Conrad Ho Shang, 34, 3400 block of Dolfield Ave.; Shelly White, 5400 block of Jonquill Ave.; Patrick Ishmael, 26, 4200 block of Horizon Circle; and Clifton Grant, 33, 4900 block of West Hills Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Nine Baltimore arts groups, including the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Artscape, have received a total of nearly $2.53 million in grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. The grants, announced Wednesday, included $100,000 for the BSO, $80,000 for the BMA and $45,000 for Artscape, Baltimore's free annual arts festival, which is scheduled this year for July 18-20. "These NEA-supported projects will not only have a positive impact on local economies, but will also provide opportunities for people of all ages to participate in the arts, help our communities to become more vibrant, and support our nation's artists as they contribute to our cultural landscape," said NEA acting chairwoman Joan Shigekawa.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
An influential coalition of Baltimore ministers endorsed Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler for governor Thursday, saying he's an experienced leader with a strong record on civil rights issues. At a news conference at Friendship Baptist Church, the Rev. Alvin J. Gwynn Sr., president of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Baltimore, cited Gansler's "expertise and longevity" in public service. "He understands the problems that are confronting the state of Maryland and the city of Baltimore," Gwynn said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
And as they wind down a successful run of one of their most ambitious projects yet - "Unscripted," which takes impromptu sketch comedy to another level by putting on entirely impromptu plays that can last upward of 90 minutes - BIG is showing no signs of slowing down. "Improv is one of the best creative outlets I've ever had," says Heather Moyer, a founding member of the group and the only one who was there at the beginning and still performing. "I love hearing the audience laugh.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
Even as US Lacrosse prepares to move from its city headquarters to a business park in a Baltimore County, the governing body for the country's fastest-growing sport isn't straying from its roots. The organization outgrew its original base on University Parkway next to the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood Field more than a decade ago and has been renting office space nearby for its 80 employees. Since forming 15 years ago as the merger of eight disparate groups, US Lacrosse has grown from 12 employees serving 15,000 players, coaches, officials and others involved in the game to a current membership of more than 415,000.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
Six Baltimore community groups filed an $8 million lawsuit Tuesday against a Texas man whose companies own dozens of properties in the city, alleging that he failed to improve rundown homes after purchasing them at tax sales and allowed them to become a danger. "The lawsuit challenges the practice of purchasing vacant properties at tax sale and leaving them for dead with unaddressed city code violations," said Kristine Dunkerton, executive director of the Community Law Center Inc., a nonprofit based in Baltimore that represents the community associations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
The turning point for the Wham City Comedy Tour came at a gig in Buffalo, N.Y. And, in typical Wham City fashion, it took some unexpected chaos and quick improvisation to reach it. On Monday, the tour - which consists of six comedians from the city's experimental arts collective Wham City and a director, all traveling the Northeast and Midwest in a white van for about three weeks this month - played an arts gallery/performance space called the...
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1997
When the second Toyota Invitational golf tournament is held next month, members of the Senior PGA Tour could well be playing for a full-field tournament in this area instead of the current two-day event.The opinions of the players as to the viability of such an event will draw careful consideration from the Player Advisory Council in its consultations with the tour's policy board. Ten of the expected 20 pros will be making return visits, including Hale Irwin, David Graham, Jim Dent and Buddy Allin, who have combined for nine tour victories this year.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1995
A Baltimore group planning to bus city residents to jobs along U.S. 1 in the Jessup-Laurel industrial corridor has postponed its plans until next year.The Historic East Baltimore Community Action Coalition had hoped to begin its $2.8 million project two months ago, said Scot Spencer, the coalition's director for physical development. But the federal money, which is to be dispensed through a nonprofit Philadelphia group, may not be available until next year, Mr. Spencer said."We are confident we will receive funding for our program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
Typically, a singer is excited to discuss the ins and outs of her band's debut album, especially a well-received, highly anticipated one like Secret Mountains' "Rainer. " But today, singer Kelly Laughlin announced she left the Baltimore sextet earlier this year, right before "Rainer" was released in late February. The 21-year-old Laughlin, who graduates from the Maryland Institute College of Art with a degree in printmaking next month, says there were many factors that led to her decision (including the possibility of enrolling in graduate school and the fact that two band members live in New York)
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
Shomrim, the Orthodox Jewish neighborhood watch group, is well-known for its work in its Northwest Baltimore community . Last night, they say they helped someone in San Francisco.  In an e-mail to supporters, the group said that it received a call to its hotline last night from a woman who was locked in a storage rental facility with her kids. She was "hysterical" and crying, and her phone died during the call. But Shomrim says its dispatcher was able to determine she was at a storage facility in San Francisco that was closed for the day. They were able to make contact with San Francisco police, who called back later to say they had located the woman and children.  "We have no idea how the woman had Shomrim's hotline number, but it certainly worked out for the best," the group said.
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