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NEWS
July 6, 1992
AN EAST COAST visitor bound for Baltimore from New York late last month found herself a victim of the Amtrak labor unpleasantness.She took a cab to the Port Authority bus terminal in Manhattan and was about to get in the line for Greyhound when she was handed a flier advertising Peter Pan bus company's new service to Baltimore. The fare was a few shekels under Greyhound's, so she took a chance and bought a ticket.Then she called her Baltimore hosts to inform them of the change in plans.And her Baltimore hosts got on the phone to find out where to pick her up.Sure enough, Peter Pan, a line familiar to New Englanders -- college students know it well -- has begun service to Baltimore from New York.
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FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | March 4, 2008
Baltimore has been many a musician's muse over the years. Today, the indie rock group Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks release their latest album, Real Emotional Trash. Malkmus was the primary singer and songwriter for the indie rock band Pavement until they split in the late '90s. Based in Portland, Ore., the band looked to the East Coast for the title to its new single, "Baltimore." The word "Baltimore" has popped up in plenty of songs.
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BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 22, 1996
AND Software, a Dutch company, will move its North American headquarters and five employees to Baltimore from New York, the Greater Baltimore Alliance has announced.AND, which makes route-planning, electronic publishing and geographic data products, expects to boost its local complement to 20 workers within two years, GBA said. The company, based in Rotterdam, considered several other U.S. sites, including Raleigh-Durham, N.C., and Philadelphia."This is a well-respected, aggressive, growing company in the information technology industry whose commitment to the Baltimore region will help us bring other international technology firms to the area," said Ann Coscia, the GBA's executive director.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1997
Lutheran World Relief, a nonprofit agency which operates and funds development and relief efforts in 50 countries, said yesterday that it will shift its world headquarters to Baltimore from New York City.While the move will result in just 25 jobs coming to the city, Baltimore officials said the decision has a larger, symbolic value because it involves yet another major relief agency having chosen Baltimore as its headquarters.The agency, which had a 1996 budget of $19.3 million, hasn't selected a specific location for its headquarters, but fully expects to set up operations inside the city, said Jonathan Frerichs, a spokesman for Lutheran World Relief.
NEWS
By Staff Report | February 6, 1993
A quarter of a million dollars worth of morphine was seized yesterday from an apartment that police believe was the base for a large West Baltimore drug-distribution ring, narcotics officers said.Western District drug enforcement officers raided the apartment in the 300 block of W. Monument St. about 2:40 p.m. and found roughly 1 pound of unpackaged morphine and 5,100 small glassine bags containing morphine, police said. The glassine bags appeared to be ready for sale on the street and would fetch about $20 apiece, police said.
NEWS
August 14, 1995
A young man shot fatally early yesterday on a grassy plot behind a home in the 800 block of W. Lexington St. was a resident of Brooklyn, N.Y., Baltimore homicide detectives said.The victim was identified as Cecilio Hardamon, 23.He was shot in the chest and both arms about 1:30 a.m., police said.He was taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he died about three hours later.Police said they knew of no motive or suspects.Mr. Hardamon family was expected to come to Baltimore from New York this week to claim the body after an autopsy by the state medical examiner, police said.
NEWS
By John Rivera | January 1, 1992
While much of the city prepared last night to celebrate the New Year, the mood at the intersection of Gold and Division streets in West Baltimore was far from one of revelry.More than 60 people, including a number of neighborhood residents, gathered to commemorate the 303 murders committed in the city during the past year and to pay tribute to two women who fell at the corner, innocent bystanders shot to death just after midnight on Christmas Day.Speakers representing church and community groups exhorted the residents to become involved and to continue to aid efforts to combat drug traffic in the area.
NEWS
August 17, 1992
Could it be that officials at the Port of Baltimore have finally learned from hard experience what it takes to get this city's maritime business back on its feet? There are encouraging indications that this is happening.Take, for instance, the return of McCrory Stores to the local port. Six years ago, the York, Pa., five-and-dime chain abandoned Baltimore for California, expressing concerns about U.S. Customs delays and chronic labor problems. It was not alone. LTC Baltimore suffered numerous body blows as its market share dwindled and shipping lines as well as old customers moved their business elsewhere.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1997
Lutheran World Relief, a nonprofit agency which operates and funds development and relief efforts in 50 countries, said yesterday that it will shift its world headquarters to Baltimore from New York City.While the move will result in just 25 jobs coming to the city, Baltimore officials said the decision has a larger, symbolic value because it involves yet another major relief agency having chosen Baltimore as its headquarters.The agency, which had a 1996 budget of $19.3 million, hasn't selected a specific location for its headquarters, but fully expects to set up operations inside the city, said Jonathan Frerichs, a spokesman for Lutheran World Relief.
FEATURES
By Eric Adams | June 12, 1991
Miranda Pakulski rehearses her monologue alone in the middle of the floor. Twitching and shuddering, she dodges imaginary people who refuse to acknowledge her. Frustrated, she says unassertively, "Hey, watch where you're going."Her director, Adam Seabrook, isn't satisfied. He encourages her to shout the line as if it was her own, like she was the one being pushed around, not her character. "Make the whole play that one line," Mr. Seabrook says quietly, but with care. The advice hits home: The actress unleashes an emotional scream that echoes through the Fells Point Corner Theater.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 22, 1996
AND Software, a Dutch company, will move its North American headquarters and five employees to Baltimore from New York, the Greater Baltimore Alliance has announced.AND, which makes route-planning, electronic publishing and geographic data products, expects to boost its local complement to 20 workers within two years, GBA said. The company, based in Rotterdam, considered several other U.S. sites, including Raleigh-Durham, N.C., and Philadelphia."This is a well-respected, aggressive, growing company in the information technology industry whose commitment to the Baltimore region will help us bring other international technology firms to the area," said Ann Coscia, the GBA's executive director.
NEWS
August 14, 1995
A young man shot fatally early yesterday on a grassy plot behind a home in the 800 block of W. Lexington St. was a resident of Brooklyn, N.Y., Baltimore homicide detectives said.The victim was identified as Cecilio Hardamon, 23.He was shot in the chest and both arms about 1:30 a.m., police said.He was taken to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he died about three hours later.Police said they knew of no motive or suspects.Mr. Hardamon family was expected to come to Baltimore from New York this week to claim the body after an autopsy by the state medical examiner, police said.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | December 10, 1993
A paroled New York drug dealer has been arrested in the slaying of Tauris Johnson, the 10-year-old East Baltimore boy whose Nov. 4 death in a cross-fire of bullets symbolized the victimization of innocent people by heavily armed drug dealers warring for turf.During Wednesday's arrest of Nathaniel Dawson, 24, at a Bronx apartment, police and federal agents seized 3 pounds each of cocaine and marijuana, as well as an arsenal of weapons -- including 11 handguns, a sawed-off shotgun and 3,000 rounds of ammunition, Baltimore police reported.
NEWS
By Staff Report | February 6, 1993
A quarter of a million dollars worth of morphine was seized yesterday from an apartment that police believe was the base for a large West Baltimore drug-distribution ring, narcotics officers said.Western District drug enforcement officers raided the apartment in the 300 block of W. Monument St. about 2:40 p.m. and found roughly 1 pound of unpackaged morphine and 5,100 small glassine bags containing morphine, police said. The glassine bags appeared to be ready for sale on the street and would fetch about $20 apiece, police said.
NEWS
August 17, 1992
Could it be that officials at the Port of Baltimore have finally learned from hard experience what it takes to get this city's maritime business back on its feet? There are encouraging indications that this is happening.Take, for instance, the return of McCrory Stores to the local port. Six years ago, the York, Pa., five-and-dime chain abandoned Baltimore for California, expressing concerns about U.S. Customs delays and chronic labor problems. It was not alone. LTC Baltimore suffered numerous body blows as its market share dwindled and shipping lines as well as old customers moved their business elsewhere.
NEWS
July 6, 1992
AN EAST COAST visitor bound for Baltimore from New York late last month found herself a victim of the Amtrak labor unpleasantness.She took a cab to the Port Authority bus terminal in Manhattan and was about to get in the line for Greyhound when she was handed a flier advertising Peter Pan bus company's new service to Baltimore. The fare was a few shekels under Greyhound's, so she took a chance and bought a ticket.Then she called her Baltimore hosts to inform them of the change in plans.And her Baltimore hosts got on the phone to find out where to pick her up.Sure enough, Peter Pan, a line familiar to New Englanders -- college students know it well -- has begun service to Baltimore from New York.
NEWS
By Eric Hubler | September 6, 1991
WHEN work brought me to Baltimore from New York for a several-month stint, I picked an apartment as a New Yorker would pick one. To a New Yorker, convenience ranks above comfort; walking to work is more important than being able to barbecue in the back yard. I rented a place within saluting distance of the Washington Monument, about as "downtown" as you can get in Baltimore.I was excited to have found the closest thing in Baltimore to a New York neighborhood. Not just work was within walking distance.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | March 4, 2008
Baltimore has been many a musician's muse over the years. Today, the indie rock group Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks release their latest album, Real Emotional Trash. Malkmus was the primary singer and songwriter for the indie rock band Pavement until they split in the late '90s. Based in Portland, Ore., the band looked to the East Coast for the title to its new single, "Baltimore." The word "Baltimore" has popped up in plenty of songs.
NEWS
By John Rivera | January 1, 1992
While much of the city prepared last night to celebrate the New Year, the mood at the intersection of Gold and Division streets in West Baltimore was far from one of revelry.More than 60 people, including a number of neighborhood residents, gathered to commemorate the 303 murders committed in the city during the past year and to pay tribute to two women who fell at the corner, innocent bystanders shot to death just after midnight on Christmas Day.Speakers representing church and community groups exhorted the residents to become involved and to continue to aid efforts to combat drug traffic in the area.
NEWS
By Eric Hubler | September 6, 1991
WHEN work brought me to Baltimore from New York for a several-month stint, I picked an apartment as a New Yorker would pick one. To a New Yorker, convenience ranks above comfort; walking to work is more important than being able to barbecue in the back yard. I rented a place within saluting distance of the Washington Monument, about as "downtown" as you can get in Baltimore.I was excited to have found the closest thing in Baltimore to a New York neighborhood. Not just work was within walking distance.
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