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By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2003
It's 8 a.m. on the first day of the new Baltimore Freedom Academy. The school's 105 pioneering ninth-graders will be arriving in minutes. The atmosphere is frenetic. "We're having a baby today! One hundred of them!" Tisha Edwards, the head of school, gushes to a parent volunteer in the cramped office of the academy, which for now is meeting at Baltimore City Community College downtown. For the next four years, Edwards, a woman with no background in education, will be momma to those babies.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
While other city high school principals excitedly read off the names of colleges and universities their students will disperse to at the end of the school year, Denise Gordon fanned through a stack of acceptance letters with less enthusiasm. "New Era, Dunbar, Ben Franklin, Carver, Edmondson, Digital, Mervo - a lot of New Era," she read. Gordon, who has spent her eight years as a principal at Southside Academy, which closed its doors for good Wednesday, never thought she'd be sending her students to different high schools, faced with the school system's decision that they'd be better served somewhere else.
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NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | December 5, 2005
The Baltimore school system has named 15 Welch-Tildon Student Ambassadors through a program that recognizes well-rounded high school students. The program is named after two recent chairs of the city school board, Patricia L. Welch and J. Tyson Tildon. The student ambassadors, all high school juniors, were selected based on academics, leadership, character and communication skills. The student ambassadors will represent Baltimore City public schools in various ways throughout their junior year.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | March 12, 2013
The Baltimore City school board remained deadlocked Tuesday on whether to renew the contract for Baltimore Talent Development High School, run by the Center for Social Organization of Schools at the Johns Hopkins University, extending a decision that was already deferred one month due to an apparent impasse. Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso recommended severing ties with the high-profile organization based on an intensive contract renewal process that scrutinized more than two dozen schools, such as charters, that are run by external operators.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
Baltimore Freedom Academy students marched along East Fayette Street and in front of City Hall late Thursday afternoon, chanting "Save our schools!" and hoisting placards with such messages as "No Justice, No Peace, No Air, No Heat. " They led a procession of the school's teachers, faculty and parents into the adjacent War Memorial Building, where the group of about 40 joined approximately 200 other residents demanding that elected officials come up with funding to fix the city's deteriorating schools.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | March 12, 2013
The Baltimore City school board remained deadlocked Tuesday on whether to renew the contract for Baltimore Talent Development High School, run by the Center for Social Organization of Schools at the Johns Hopkins University, extending a decision that was already deferred one month due to an apparent impasse. Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso recommended severing ties with the high-profile organization based on an intensive contract renewal process that scrutinized more than two dozen schools, such as charters, that are run by external operators.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2011
The Baltimore City Fire Department is investigating an incident involving "a bottle bomb" found at a city school Tuesday, fire officials said. Several students at Baltimore Freedom Academy discovered the quart-sized, glass bottle in a storage area of the school on East Lombard Street. They opened the bottle and were so overwhelmed with fumes that they dropped it, fire officials said. The contents of the container splattered and two students complained of eye irritations. Firefighters arrived at the school about 11:30 a.m. Paramedics treated the two students at the scene.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
While your recent editorial ("A great investment," Oct. 10) is critical of the efforts made by opponents of the Dream Act, I would encourage you not to overlook the efforts being made by Dream Act supporters. The Intersection is a non-profit organization in Baltimore that empowers high school students to have ownership in improving their communities. The students of The Intersection, having completed a rigorous training program, seek to make a difference. In doing so, they have focused their efforts on passing the Dream Act. Students from The Intersection have talked with their peers, canvassed Baltimore neighborhoods, and pushed their communities to spread the word and garner support.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2004
Former homicide Detective Ed Burns was all too familiar with 14-year-olds, the same pivotal age as the high school freshmen he was addressing recently at the Baltimore Freedom Academy, a new city public school. And even though these kids weren't necessarily facing the same kinds of troubles as the particular 14-year-old Burns had in mind -- former drug dealer and addict DeAndre McCullough -- he knew how easily the unthinkable could happen. "When I first met DeAndre, he was 14 years old," Burns told the freshmen in the school's auditorium.
NEWS
By Matt Bracken and mbracken@baltimoresun.com | March 2, 2010
Just one year ago, Kevin Smith couldn't be stopped. Baltimore Freedom Academy's sophomore point guard averaged nearly 30 points and eight assists per game, playing in relative anonymity at the East Baltimore charter school on Lombard St. Today Smith, who moved to Baltimore from Brooklyn, N.Y. before his sixth-grade year, finds himself far removed from city life and his earlier high school basketball existence. The 6-foot, 200-pound junior now lives in West Virginia, going to school during the day and playing for Huntington Prep at night.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
While your recent editorial ("A great investment," Oct. 10) is critical of the efforts made by opponents of the Dream Act, I would encourage you not to overlook the efforts being made by Dream Act supporters. The Intersection is a non-profit organization in Baltimore that empowers high school students to have ownership in improving their communities. The students of The Intersection, having completed a rigorous training program, seek to make a difference. In doing so, they have focused their efforts on passing the Dream Act. Students from The Intersection have talked with their peers, canvassed Baltimore neighborhoods, and pushed their communities to spread the word and garner support.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2011
Baltimore Freedom Academy students marched along East Fayette Street and in front of City Hall late Thursday afternoon, chanting "Save our schools!" and hoisting placards with such messages as "No Justice, No Peace, No Air, No Heat. " They led a procession of the school's teachers, faculty and parents into the adjacent War Memorial Building, where the group of about 40 joined approximately 200 other residents demanding that elected officials come up with funding to fix the city's deteriorating schools.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2011
The Baltimore City Fire Department is investigating an incident involving "a bottle bomb" found at a city school Tuesday, fire officials said. Several students at Baltimore Freedom Academy discovered the quart-sized, glass bottle in a storage area of the school on East Lombard Street. They opened the bottle and were so overwhelmed with fumes that they dropped it, fire officials said. The contents of the container splattered and two students complained of eye irritations. Firefighters arrived at the school about 11:30 a.m. Paramedics treated the two students at the scene.
NEWS
By Matt Bracken and mbracken@baltimoresun.com | March 2, 2010
Just one year ago, Kevin Smith couldn't be stopped. Baltimore Freedom Academy's sophomore point guard averaged nearly 30 points and eight assists per game, playing in relative anonymity at the East Baltimore charter school on Lombard St. Today Smith, who moved to Baltimore from Brooklyn, N.Y. before his sixth-grade year, finds himself far removed from city life and his earlier high school basketball existence. The 6-foot, 200-pound junior now lives in West Virginia, going to school during the day and playing for Huntington Prep at night.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | December 5, 2005
The Baltimore school system has named 15 Welch-Tildon Student Ambassadors through a program that recognizes well-rounded high school students. The program is named after two recent chairs of the city school board, Patricia L. Welch and J. Tyson Tildon. The student ambassadors, all high school juniors, were selected based on academics, leadership, character and communication skills. The student ambassadors will represent Baltimore City public schools in various ways throughout their junior year.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2004
Former homicide Detective Ed Burns was all too familiar with 14-year-olds, the same pivotal age as the high school freshmen he was addressing recently at the Baltimore Freedom Academy, a new city public school. And even though these kids weren't necessarily facing the same kinds of troubles as the particular 14-year-old Burns had in mind -- former drug dealer and addict DeAndre McCullough -- he knew how easily the unthinkable could happen. "When I first met DeAndre, he was 14 years old," Burns told the freshmen in the school's auditorium.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
At the Baltimore Freedom Academy, a new public high school opening this fall, the goal is to develop future leaders. So it was a fitting experiment yesterday when 85 of the school's incoming freshmen gathered on the muddy grounds of a local private school for a day of climbing, hoisting, balancing, hiking and sweating - with some strategizing, brainstorming and bonding tossed in. "I swear, y'all better catch me," Phelicia Parker warned as she closed her...
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
While other city high school principals excitedly read off the names of colleges and universities their students will disperse to at the end of the school year, Denise Gordon fanned through a stack of acceptance letters with less enthusiasm. "New Era, Dunbar, Ben Franklin, Carver, Edmondson, Digital, Mervo - a lot of New Era," she read. Gordon, who has spent her eight years as a principal at Southside Academy, which closed its doors for good Wednesday, never thought she'd be sending her students to different high schools, faced with the school system's decision that they'd be better served somewhere else.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2003
It's 8 a.m. on the first day of the new Baltimore Freedom Academy. The school's 105 pioneering ninth-graders will be arriving in minutes. The atmosphere is frenetic. "We're having a baby today! One hundred of them!" Tisha Edwards, the head of school, gushes to a parent volunteer in the cramped office of the academy, which for now is meeting at Baltimore City Community College downtown. For the next four years, Edwards, a woman with no background in education, will be momma to those babies.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
At the Baltimore Freedom Academy, a new public high school opening this fall, the goal is to develop future leaders. So it was a fitting experiment yesterday when 85 of the school's incoming freshmen gathered on the muddy grounds of a local private school for a day of climbing, hoisting, balancing, hiking and sweating - with some strategizing, brainstorming and bonding tossed in. "I swear, y'all better catch me," Phelicia Parker warned as she closed her...
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