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By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2000
Ultimately, Blast midfielder Barry Stitz didn't want to risk having to wait 14 years for another chance. So he decided to retire after this, his eighth season with the Baltimore franchise in the National Professional Soccer League, to take over the coaching job at Archbishop Curley High School, his alma mater. His coach at Curley, Pep Perrella, had been there 14 years, a norm for soccer coaches, which is why Stitz is seizing the chance. "If I want to get into coaching, then I think this is a good step," Stitz said.
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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2013
In the months since the weather warmed up, a Kona Ice truck has been traveling to events in Baltimore County — car shows and ball games and the farmers' market in Towson, to name a few. The brightly colored truck, owned by Joni and Claude Elmore, sells cones filled with shaved ice. Customers can add their own flavored syrups from a row of 10 choices affixed to the side of the vehicle, or request a flavor from the 20 inside the truck. Meanwhile, calypso music plays. Kona Ice, founded in 2007, now has more than 300 franchised trucks operating in 41 states and each one has a mandate to give to the communities it serves.
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SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | July 22, 1991
Cleveland Browns owner Art Modell, who was quoted in yesterday's editions of The New York Times as favoring Charlotte, N.C., and St. Louis for the two NFL expansion cities, said from his home last night that he hasn't prejudged the cities."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | October 3, 2009
News item: The Orioles could close out the regular season Sunday with the second-biggest loss total in the history of the Baltimore franchise. My take: I know you're all discouraged, but it could be worse. That could be Arrowhead Stadium on the other side of the parking lot. News item: The Ravens are looking to improve their record to 4-0 Sunday when they take on the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium. My take: The oddsmakers have posted the Pats as a slight favorite and - to be honest - I have to agree, but that'll be some very tasty crow if I'm wrong.
NEWS
February 4, 2002
IT'S POSSIBLE that a Washington baseball team would only slightly hinder the Orioles' ability to stay competitive. Or it could become a devastating obstacle to the Baltimore franchise's success. The truth is that no one really knows which eventuality would come to pass. But here's one thing that's indisputable: Adding a second major-league franchise so close to this area couldn't help Baltimore's beloved Orioles. Not in a market this small; not when so much of baseball's revenue comes from television and radio rights and sponsorships; and not when the difference between big-market and small-market clubs plays out so dramatically on the field each year.
BUSINESS
By Jennifer Dorroh and Jennifer Dorroh,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2001
The right to sell "Hot Doughnuts Now" in Baltimore will change hands at the end of this month. Krispy Kreme Doughnuts Inc. said yesterday that it will buy back its franchise rights to the Baltimore market and acquire four retail stores from the owners who gained the rights in 1996. The company, based in Winston-Salem, N.C., plans to combine its Baltimore and Washington markets. "We can operate more efficiently as one company vs. two," said Stan Parker, senior vice president of marketing for Krispy Kreme.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | February 21, 1991
Ed Hale couldn't have been happier last night, as he ate a cup of microwaved soup."I'm the only true local group left in the game and I think Baltimore, today, is probably in the best position it has ever been in to get an NFL franchise," said Hale, when asked his reaction to zTC the news that businessman Robert Tisch has withdrawn as a possible NFL franchise owner here. "I think my group has to move to the front and I'm very happy. Very happy."Tisch called Gov. William Donald Schaefer yesterday to tell him he has bought 50 percent of the New York Giants and no longer was interested in a Baltimore franchise.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray | September 13, 1991
Baltimore's application for an NFL expansion franchise, due Monday, will list "five or six" potential ownership groups, the head of the Maryland Stadium Authority said yesterday.But the list may not include Edwin Hale, the owner of the Blast soccer team.Herbert J. Belgrad, chairman of the stadium authority, said Hale has been so immersed in his takeover bid of Baltimore Bancorp that he wasn't expected to file the $100,000 application fee by the Oct. 1 deadline."He's so involved with the bank takeover that he won't be able to do it at this point," said Belgrad, whose NFL task force is seeking one of two expansion teams for 1994.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | April 12, 1995
Two years after the Skipjacks left town for Portland, Maine, hockey is returning to Baltimore.Baltimore and Lexington, Ky., were awarded franchises yesterday by the American Hockey League, to begin play in the 1995-96 season.As the Skipjacks did, the new Baltimore team will play at the 12,000-seat Baltimore Arena. The team has yet to decide on a nickname."We have made great strides in the realization of our strategic plan with the acceptance of these two cities," said AHL president Dave Andrews during a news conference in West Springfield, Mass.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan | October 26, 1997
He's said it so often that many have come to dismiss it as the old chief executive's paranoid rambling.It was the Redskins' fault, says former Gov. William Donald Schaefer. The Redskins and their owner, Jack Kent Cooke, delivered him one of his most stinging rebukes. Cooke and National Football league Commissioner Paul Tagliabue conspired against Baltimore and cost us the expansion franchise that rightfully should have been ours.As daffy as it sounds, Schaefer might be right. The state's expansion strategy had its flaws.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | January 7, 2007
Baltimore's painful football past will clash with its passionate present when the second-seeded Ravens host the Indianapolis Colts in an NFL divisional playoff game Saturday at 4:30 p.m. The third-seeded Colts overcame a sloppy day by quarterback Peyton Manning with a surprisingly strong defensive effort to beat the Kansas City Chiefs, 23-8, yesterday to set up next weekend's emotional second-round showdown. Colts@Ravens AFC divisional playoff, Saturday, 4:30 p.m., chs. 13, 9, 1090 AM, 97.9 FM Line: Ravens by 4
NEWS
February 4, 2002
IT'S POSSIBLE that a Washington baseball team would only slightly hinder the Orioles' ability to stay competitive. Or it could become a devastating obstacle to the Baltimore franchise's success. The truth is that no one really knows which eventuality would come to pass. But here's one thing that's indisputable: Adding a second major-league franchise so close to this area couldn't help Baltimore's beloved Orioles. Not in a market this small; not when so much of baseball's revenue comes from television and radio rights and sponsorships; and not when the difference between big-market and small-market clubs plays out so dramatically on the field each year.
BUSINESS
By Jennifer Dorroh and Jennifer Dorroh,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2001
The right to sell "Hot Doughnuts Now" in Baltimore will change hands at the end of this month. Krispy Kreme Doughnuts Inc. said yesterday that it will buy back its franchise rights to the Baltimore market and acquire four retail stores from the owners who gained the rights in 1996. The company, based in Winston-Salem, N.C., plans to combine its Baltimore and Washington markets. "We can operate more efficiently as one company vs. two," said Stan Parker, senior vice president of marketing for Krispy Kreme.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2000
Ultimately, Blast midfielder Barry Stitz didn't want to risk having to wait 14 years for another chance. So he decided to retire after this, his eighth season with the Baltimore franchise in the National Professional Soccer League, to take over the coaching job at Archbishop Curley High School, his alma mater. His coach at Curley, Pep Perrella, had been there 14 years, a norm for soccer coaches, which is why Stitz is seizing the chance. "If I want to get into coaching, then I think this is a good step," Stitz said.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan | October 26, 1997
He's said it so often that many have come to dismiss it as the old chief executive's paranoid rambling.It was the Redskins' fault, says former Gov. William Donald Schaefer. The Redskins and their owner, Jack Kent Cooke, delivered him one of his most stinging rebukes. Cooke and National Football league Commissioner Paul Tagliabue conspired against Baltimore and cost us the expansion franchise that rightfully should have been ours.As daffy as it sounds, Schaefer might be right. The state's expansion strategy had its flaws.
SPORTS
By From Staff Reports | April 12, 1995
Two years after the Skipjacks left town for Portland, Maine, hockey is returning to Baltimore.Baltimore and Lexington, Ky., were awarded franchises yesterday by the American Hockey League, to begin play in the 1995-96 season.As the Skipjacks did, the new Baltimore team will play at the 12,000-seat Baltimore Arena. The team has yet to decide on a nickname."We have made great strides in the realization of our strategic plan with the acceptance of these two cities," said AHL president Dave Andrews during a news conference in West Springfield, Mass.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | November 1, 1993
Simon Says:So Beavis and Butt-head have no redeeming social value? You mean the Three Stooges did?*Is it just me, or do you have to get to the very end of a lot of commercials these days to find out what the heck they are selling?*Charlottesville, Va., is fast becoming the Santa Fe, N.M., of the east.*Need to measure something, but you don't have a ruler?A dollar bill is approximately 6 inches long. (And the first person who asks how long a $5 bill is will be kept after class.)*You know you're old when you can remember when Halloween didn't mean a trip to the hospital to X-ray the candy.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | October 3, 2009
News item: The Orioles could close out the regular season Sunday with the second-biggest loss total in the history of the Baltimore franchise. My take: I know you're all discouraged, but it could be worse. That could be Arrowhead Stadium on the other side of the parking lot. News item: The Ravens are looking to improve their record to 4-0 Sunday when they take on the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium. My take: The oddsmakers have posted the Pats as a slight favorite and - to be honest - I have to agree, but that'll be some very tasty crow if I'm wrong.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | May 27, 1994
Becoming enamored with owners of professional sports franchises is a precarious experience. Peter Angelos, who bought the Baltimore Orioles for a record $173 million, isn't ready for deification. Nor is he to be vilified. A reading on a team owner must await 18 months for a fair appraisal. That, in truth, is the extent of any ownership honeymoon.Then you'll know whether to put him on a tentative list for future Hall of Fame consideration or make a novena that he steps aside and sells the team.
NEWS
By JACK GILDEN | February 2, 1994
Living the bachelor's life, I tumbled out of bed late a couple of Saturdays ago and walked out into the bitter January air, a sharp beard bristling from my face and breakfast on my mind. Arriving at the Grand Opening of the new Super Fresh on 41st Street, I found myself in a virtual mob wedged next to Mayor Schmoke.His Honor was cutting ribbons, smiling blankly and shaking hands with eager patrons. When he turned toward me, I responded like any good Hampdenite; I bored him. ''Nice to meet you Mr. Mayor,'' I murmured.
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