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April 1, 1994
The 25th Annual Baltimore International Film Festival will open Wednesday at the Senator Theatre with an 8 p.m. screening of "The Scent of Green Papaya," winner of the Camera d'Or at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival.A champagne reception precedes the film at 7:30 p.m., and a desert reception follows at 10 p.m. Tickets for opening and closing nights are $12 general admission and $10 for seniors, students and members of the Baltimore Film Forum.All other festival films will show at the Baltimore Museum of Art ($6 general admission and $5 for seniors, students and forum members)
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
As hundreds walked through Baltimore on Thursday to protest a police shooting in Missouri, uniformed officers were recording their every move. The decision by the Baltimore Police Department to record the march raised questions about how the tapes would be used and why authorities had chosen to record the event. Participants said they saw as many as a dozen officers shadowing the crowds and filming them, almost like a documentary crew, as the protesters walked to the Inner Harbor or spoke with officers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 21, 1995
No two more disparate films could be imagined than the odd couple that show today at the 26th Annual Baltimore International Film Festival at the Baltimore Museum of Art.The 7:30 screening is a dour, plodding Czech piece called "The Cow," which lays out the relentlessly depressing story of poor Adam, crippled son of a prostitute, who tries to eke out a living in the high mountains.Sisyphus had nothing on this kid. Each day after working in a coal mine, he loads up his knapsack with dirt to haul up to his farm in hopes of enriching the soil.
NEWS
January 11, 2014
Netflix picked up the promotional tempo for the Feb. 14 debut of Season 2 of "House of Cards" with the release of another trailer last week. This one is worth it for Francis Underwood's assessment of what appears to be his swearing-in as vice president of the United States. "Democracy is so overrated," he says, noting that not a single vote was cast in his favor. If Underwood does officially assume the vice presidency in Season 2, we'll have two American vice presidents created on the soundstages of Baltimore: Underwood and Selina Meyer (HBO's "Veep")
FEATURES
April 5, 1995
The Baltimore Film Forum begins its 26th annual Baltimore International Film Festival today with a gala premiere of John Sayles' well-reviewed Celtic fantasy, "The Secret of Roan Inish" at the Senator Theatre.The festival, which runs through April 29, boasts 22 films representing more than 15 countries."The Secret of Roan Inish" follows an Irish fishing family as it comes to terms with the legend of the Selkies, half-human and half-seal. The 8 p.m. screening is preceded by a 7:30 p.m. champagne reception and will be followed by complimentary desserts provided by Spike & Charlie's.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | March 28, 1993
Film animator T. Carlos Williams of Baltimore recently won $2,500 award from Sony Corp. as part of its annual Sony Innovators Awards Program, a national competition recognizing African-American achievements in music and film/video.Mr. Williams was named 1993 Sony Innovator in Animation for his film "Da Bridge." His award includes a mentoring seminar conducted by film and video professionals."Live, Gifted and Black," a Baltimore Symphony Orchestra open rehearsal featuring the world premiere of "Festival Music," a piece by African-American composer Adolphus Hailstork, will begin at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter | November 30, 1995
Though it will end its 26-year life in January, the Baltimore Film Forum is going out in style. Tomorrow at 7 p.m., at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Forum will screen "Giant," the epic George Stevens film with Rock Hudson, Elizabeth Taylor and James Dean, in commemoration of World AIDS Day. Professor David Bergman, editor of "Men on Men," will discuss the significance of Hudson as the first major celebrity "outed" by AIDS.Admission is $4 for BMA and BFF members, seniors and students; $5 otherwise.
FEATURES
April 1, 1993
The 24th annual Baltimore Film Festival opens tonight at the Senator with the grand-prize winner of the Cannes Film Festival, "Il Ladro di Bambini" ("The Stolen Children") by director Gianni Amelio.An opening night reception begins at 7:30 p.m., and the film will be screened at 8 p.m.Over the next four weekends, the Film Festival will show 26 features from 17 different cultures. Among the highlights are the new work, "Simple Men," by the American independent filmmaker Hal Hartley; "Cousin Bobby," a documentary by Academy Award-winner Jonathan ("Silence of the Lambs")
FEATURES
October 5, 1993
To celebrate its 54th anniversary, the Senator Theatre is rolling back its prices and its feature film more than 50 years. Tonight, the Senator will present the 1942 classic "Now Voyager," starring Bette Davis and Paul Henreid. Admission is 25 cents. Popcorn and soda will also be 25 cents each.The Senator traditionally features a film from 1939 each year on its birthday, but this year the theater is breaking tradition in memory of the former president of the Baltimore Film Forum, the late Helen Cyr, whose favorite film was "Now Voyager."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | September 27, 1990
The Baltimore Film Forum continues its premiere series this weekend with two more films drawn from short stories by the Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez.These films, which Marquez himself adapted for Spanish television in the mid-'80s, are surprisingly fanciful and erotic.Tonight's performance at the Baltimore Museum of Art is "A Very Old Man with Enormous Arms." Tomorrow's will be "Fable of the Beautiful Pigeon Fancier."The screenings begin at 8 p.m. Admission is $4 for Film Forum and Museum members, students and seniors, and $5 for all others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
When “12 O'Clock Boys” director Lotfy Nathan brought his film to this month's South by Southwest film festival, one of his main goals was to find distribution for the documentary. Nathan didn't have to wait long, as deadline.com reported this week that Oscilloscope Laboratories had purchased the North American rights to Nathan's documentary on the West Baltimore dirt-bike riders. Oscilloscope, which was co-founded by deceased Beastie Boy Adam “MCA” Yauch, is considered a boutique film company.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
Baltimore is one city where crowds come out in the heat of the night to take in open-air movies. In mid-July last year, when the thermometer was hitting 95 in the day and stalling in the 80s past midnight, fun-seekers swarmed to Federal Hill to watch (what else?) "Some Like It Hot. " A month later, when it was 89 in the day and 80 throughout the evening, Baltimoreans in search of a Mediterranean getaway turned up in Little Italy for "Nine. " Even when Charm City itself isn't charming, its outdoor summer film festivals are, largely because of their block-party feeling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 30, 2011
Are there any delights so sublime, so dependable, as those derived from watching -- and deriding -- a really bad movie? Not for Mark Colegrove, a founder and organizer of the monthly Mondo Baltimore film series . The first Thursday of every month, he and his fellow connoisseurs of cinematic dreck -- and we're talking films that are mind-numbingly bad, to the point where they may actually kill brain cells -- take over the Windup Space for...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
Watching "Eichmann" on Holocaust Remembrance Day in the Baltimore Jewish Film Festival will remind viewers of the power movies can get from timing and circumstance. It's not a crackerjack film, but it's a strong conversation-starter. (Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin will be the guest speaker.) It centers on an Israeli police interrogator, Capt. Avner Less, who relentlessly questioned Adolph Eichmann, a prime engineer of Hitler's Final Solution, from May 29, 1960 (shortly after Eichmann's capture in a Buenos Aires suburb)
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | February 6, 2009
Are guys really that hard to understand? They are, at least according to He's Just Not That Into You, a romantic comedy in which young, excessively attractive Baltimoreans struggle to understand dating, relationships and their significant others. The premise is pretty simple: When it comes to matters of the heart, women steadfastly refuse to see what's right in front of them. The same holds true for guys, by the way, but let's let the gals believe in their uniqueness, at least until the movie's over.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | March 27, 2008
Founder Claudine Davison said the Baltimore Jewish Film Festival began in 1988 with three films and "a lot of apprehension and anxiety." So the fact that organizers are preparing to show 10 films to several thousand viewers for the 20th anniversary season Tuesday through May 18 "is a very, very good feeling," she said. "The proof is in it lasting so long." The festival, now named for the William and Irene Weinberg Family and sponsored by the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore and the Senator Theatre, has moved from its early home at the Baltimore Museum of Art to the Gordon Center for Performing Arts in Owings Mills.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 19, 1999
George Udel, who almost single-handedly created the Baltimore film culture he was such a crucial fixture of, died yesterday. He was 69. Udel, who had fought heart disease for 20 years, succumbed to kidney failure at Union Memorial Hospital.At a time when Baltimore enjoys a bustling film culture -- with the Maryland Film Festival, a rejuvenated Charles Theatre, the Cinema Sundays series and countless other opportunities to screen rarely seen films -- it's easy to forget that when Udel became involved with the newly founded Baltimore Film Forum in 1969, local filmgoers had far fewer choices at their disposal.
FEATURES
November 8, 1990
The Baltimore Film Forum launches its Directors Showcase series in honor of Jean Renoir and John Ford tonight with the former's "The Crime of Mr. Lange" and tomorrow with the latter's "Grapes of Wrath." Both will be screened at 8 p.m. at the Baltimore Museum of Art's Meyerhoff Auditorium.A highlight of the series, Nov. 15, will be screening of a double feature of Renoir's "A Day in the Country" and Ford's "Stagecoach."Other Renoir films, screened Thursday nights, are: "The Grand Illusion," Nov. 29; "The Human Beast," Dec. 6; "Rules of the Game," Dec. 13. Other Ford films, presented Fridays are: "My Darling Clementine," Nov. 30; "The Searchers," Dec. 7; "The Last Hurrah," Dec. 14.Admission prices are $4 for Film Forum and BMA members, senior citizens and students, and $5 for the general public.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | October 12, 2007
Halloween is just a couple weeks away, and once again it looks like Baltimore will have to do without the classic horror filmfest the day so richly deserves. Someday, somewhere, somehow, Baltimore is going to have itself an all-night (or even all-day) horror-movie marathon around Halloween. Maybe at the Charles. Maybe at the Senator, or the Bengies. Maybe even at the soon-to-open Landmark Theatres at Harbor East. Or even at the BMA. Heck, have it at the corner of Howard and Centre streets, but have it somewhere.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | August 31, 2007
Seven years into her job putting together film festivals throughout the world, Marisa Cohen noticed that they rarely featured work by women. "There has been a real lack of female filmmakers," says the Baltimore native, who works for the Florida-based HD Fest, organizers of high-definition film festivals in New York, London, Australia and Seoul, South Korea. "Especially in mainstream films, you don't see a lot." Galvanized by the low profile of female filmmakers, she and a friend have organized the inaugural Baltimore Women's Film Festival.
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