Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaltimore Federal
IN THE NEWS

Baltimore Federal

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1996
Ten former directors and executives of failed Baltimore Federal Financial have agreed to pay $1.7 million to settle a lawsuit filed against them nearly four years ago by the Resolution rTC Trust Corp., according to documents obtained by The Sun.The directors, who include Robert E. Hecht Sr., Baltimore Federal's former chairman, and James L. Fisher, former president of Towson State University, were accused of "gross negligence" and settled the suit Dec. 15, RTC and court documents state. On Dec. 20, Judge Marvin J. Garbis dismissed the suit, which had been filed in 1992 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Scott Ponemone and For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
When Homewood was completed around 1808, the house was one of the most stylish examples of Federal domestic architecture in America. No wonder Charles Carroll Jr., its owner, wanted the most fashionable furniture to fill it. And Baltimore was just the place for producing some of the most elegant and sophisticated furniture in the fledgling United States. The resulting union was a perfect marriage of architecture and furnishings. That marriage is regularly on view at Homewood Museum, located on the Johns Hopkins University campus.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1996
The wind blew through Jim Fisher's hair as he knelt on the deck of his trawler, the Vera Brant, sanding and varnishing its teak when he was interrupted by the beep of the cellular telephone.On the other end that morning -- Feb. 9, 1992 -- was his assistant, Mary Ann Rice. Her voice was agitated as she explained that the government had just filed a lawsuit against him.The Resolution Trust Corp. -- created two years earlier to clean up the nation's exploding savings and loan -- was seeking $32 million from Fisher and nine other officers and former board members of Baltimore Federal Financial, accusing them of causing the loss of tens of millions of dollars and the collapse of the thrift.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
The Baltimore Department of Transportation has been awarded a federal grant of more than $850,000 to purchase an electric boat for its free Harbor Connector service in the Inner Harbor. The service operates water taxis along three routes across the water and between downtown and South Baltimore neighborhoods, and connects to the city's free Charm City Circulator bus network. The new boat won't add another route, but could add capacity and will "reduce the city's carbon footprint," said Barry Robinson, the city's chief of transit and marine services.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1990
Some remnants of Baltimore Federal Financial FSA fetched $52,000 for the federal government as furniture, fixtures and equipment of the defunct thrift were sold at auction yesterday. The auction took place at the savings and loan's old administration building at 500 N. Calvert St.The auction was part of the effort by the Federal Resolution Trust Corp. to sell property and assets that the government acquired when it took over Baltimore Federal in February 1989. The federal agency is still attempting to sell $42 million worth of real estate owned by the thrift, including two branch operations, according to RTC spokeswoman Kate Spears.
BUSINESS
By ASSOCIATD PRESS | November 16, 1990
NEW YORK (AP) -- Government regu lators for the first time have laid much of the blame for the savings and loan industry collapse on the junk bond dealings of Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc.In a 60-page legal claim, federal thrift regulators accuse the failed investment firm of bribery, fraud, market manipulation and other serious crimes they allege hastened the demise of 48 savings and loan institutions, including Baltimore Federal Financial F.S.A. In the case of Baltimore Federal, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | February 12, 1992
The federal Resolution Trust Corp. has filed a $32 million negligence suit against two former officers and eight past board members of Baltimore Federal Financial, a large thrift seized by regulators three years ago.The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, charges the officers and directors with "unsound and reckless" lending policies.Those policies contributed to the savings and loan's being declared insolvent by the Federal Home Loan Bank Board Feb. 7, 1989. Baltimore Federal's deposits were later sold to Household Bank FSB, which is based in Newport Beach, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | February 12, 1992
The federal Resolution Trust Corp. has filed a $32 million negligence suit against two former officers and eight past board members of Baltimore Federal Financial, a large thrift seized by regulators three years ago.The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, charges the officers and directors with "unsound and reckless" lending policies.Those policies contributed to the savings and loan's being declared insolvent by the Federal Home Loan Bank Board Feb. 7, 1989.Baltimore Federal's deposits were later sold to Household Bank FSB, which is based in Newport Beach, Calif.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2000
To the judges who never liked the sprawling, brightly colored sculpture anyhow, its return to Baltimore's federal courthouse might not be the worst part. More maddening might be the estimated price tag - $226,500 for its renovation and reinstallation. That's double what the piece cost taxpayers in 1977 and twice its current appraised value. "Good gosh," said Senior U.S. District Judge Edward S. Northrop, one of the sculpture's earliest detractors. "I just can't understand that." The General Services Administration, manager of all federal buildings, defends the cost as necessary to restore a significant piece of art that will anchor a major redesign of the plaza in front of the Edward A. Garmatz courthouse.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
For two decades, few people have understood the multicolored metal sculpture outside Baltimore's federal courthouse. Even fewer have liked it.As workers at the Edward A. Garmatz federal courthouse finished dismantling "Baltimore Federal" yesterday and sent it away for a five-month makeover, many who work at the building expressed hope it would never return."
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
A union representing nearly 1,500 Baltimore County public employees has reached an agreement with the county to extend its contract through 2016. Members of the Baltimore County Federation of Public Employees ratified the extension by a vote of 98 percent, the union said Wednesday. The group — which previously had a labor agreement with the county through 2015 — represents workers including correctional officers and emergency dispatchers. Under their contract, the employees are scheduled to get a 3 percent bonus in November 2014 and a 3 percent cost-of-living increase in July 2015.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
The port of Baltimore won a $10 million federal grant to build more access to rail, expand storage at Fairfield Marine Terminal, and help widen the channel at Seagirt Marine Terminal to accommodate bigger ships. The cash – to be matched by a state grant of $19.5 million – will pay for upgrades that position Baltimore's busy port to compete with other East Coast terminals for cargo off the world's widest boats, which will soon be passing through a newly expanded Panama Canal. Maryland's congressional delegation announced the U.S. Department of Transportation grant Friday.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Franklin Lance knows his West Baltimore neighborhood can be great — located near to Druid Hill Park, it's home to the city's biggest shopping mall, a public university, and a network of active churches and community groups. But like so many areas of Baltimore, public safety looms large as an obstacle to growth. So he and his neighbors cheered Monday the announcement that the Greater Mondawmin area has been chosen by the city health department for an expansion of the violence mediation program Safe Streets.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2012
Despite budget cuts and anti-government rhetoric in Congress, Maryland officials say the two huge federal agencies based in Woodlawn — which have long helped buoy the region's economy — may be better positioned than others to ride out the political turbulence expected over the next several years. An aging baby boomer generation should insulate the Social Security Administration and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services from looming cuts, economists say. And there will be even more work at the Medicare-Medicaid office, known as CMS, if the nation's new health care law takes effect.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
An initiative by at least a dozen federal law enforcement agents in South Baltimore on Monday evening that led to several injuries and arrests also included an exchange of gunfire, which was not initially disclosed. Special Agent Clare A. Weber, a spokeswoman for the Baltimore field office of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, said the information about gunshots on Patapsco Avenue was initially withheld because of an internal investigation. Weber would not say why the ATF was in the 1000 block of W. Patapsco Ave., near Magnolia Avenue, late Monday afternoon and early evening.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2011
Baltimore, where thousands of buildings contain lead-based paint that can poison young children, has lost federal funding for abatement programs due to mismanagement of its most recent grant, officials said Monday. Department of Housing and Urban Development officials told The Baltimore Sun that the city health department failed to fix up enough homes under the latest $4 million grant, which expired in January, and as a result the city was deemed a "high-risk" grantee ineligible to receive more funds.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1995
Under a plan that would bring sweeping changes to the appearance of Baltimore's federal courthouse, a forgotten statue of Thurgood Marshall would take center stage while another more controversial sculpture would be moved to a shady corner.That's the opinion of a panel of architects who met over the past two days to overhaul the entrance to the Garmatz federal courthouse, the hulking concrete structure on Lombard Street that houses the U.S. District Court.The proposed design change moves "Baltimore Federal," a piece of multicolored metal art that has long been a brunt of jokes, sneers and scorn.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | December 1, 1990
Household Bank FSB said yesterday that it will close three of its branches on Dec. 31 and eight of the nine branches formerly owned by Yorkridge-Calvert Federal Savings Association on Feb. The shutdowns add to a string of recent bank-branch closings. More than three dozen branches have been closed this year following Household's purchase of the deposits at Baltimore Federal Financial FSA and the merger of Equitable Bank into Maryland National Bank.Household took over the insured accounts of the failed Yorkridge-Calvert in September.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2010
A wide-reaching and drawn-out legal fight over alleged trading violations in the mutual fund industry could soon be over, with federal judges in Baltimore expected to decide this fall whether to approve settlements that could total hundreds of millions of dollars. Numerous class-action lawsuits were filed on behalf of millions of investors across the U.S. as early as 2003, accusing mutual fund companies of breaching securities laws. Investor complaints in separate cases against 17 mutual fund families were transferred in 2004 to U.S. District Court in Baltimore for coordinated proceedings.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | January 3, 2006
Hoping to end years of contentious debate over how best to prosecute gun crimes, local and federal law enforcement officials have tentatively agreed to a broad new plan to lock up any violent felon who carries a firearm in Baltimore. Significant prison time for the city's most dangerous gun-toting criminals is one component of a revived and expanded "Baltimore Exile" program. The collaborative effort, led by the U.S. attorney's office, aims to reduce violent crime, including the city's stubbornly high homicide rate.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.