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By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2009
How to Love Gordon Livingston, M.D. (DaCapo Press, 240 pages, $19.95) For Gordon Livingston, M.D., a Maryland psychiatrist and marriage counselor, empathy isn't just the secret of a happy marriage; it's also the secret of happiness. In his fourth book, he explains how we learn to love ourselves by loving others and becoming less self-absorbed. If you cultivate in yourself the characteristics you value in others, he says, you will find material success, enlightenment and marital happiness.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Hubert V. Simmons was a gentle man who threw a nasty knuckleball in Negro Leagues baseball, and for years he dreamed of establishing a museum that could tell a story about the national pastime before it was really national, when black players were barred from the majors. He died two months before a small museum opened for appointments-only viewing in the basement of his church in Lochearn, but friends and family were sure he was there in spirit on Wednesday at the Baltimore County Public Library in Owings Mills for the announcement that the memorabilia collection would soon open there, and play to much bigger crowds.
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FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | September 8, 1996
150 years ago in The SunSept. 9: Almost every-one that uses anthracite coal in this city, is grumbling at the high price of that article at the present time. At this time last year, it could be had at $5 per ton, delivered to the door. Now the price is $6, with an extra charge for delivery.Sept. 13: "The man who starves a horse degrades humanity." The same may be said of the man who abuses in any way the horse or any other dumb-beast.100 years ago in The SunSept. 9: The bicycle is becoming more and more conspicuous as efforts are made to adapt it to other uses besides a pleasure vehicle.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
On a warm, sunny afternoon at the Maritime Industries Academy baseball field, posters honoring members of the Negro leagues hung on the outfield fence and dust swirled under the banner honoring Jackie Robinson at home plate. Members of the Maritime and Southside Academies wore gray and blue pin-striped replica uniform shirts of two teams that played in the NL — the Baltimore Black Sox (Maritime) and the Baltimore Elite Giants (Southside). And they played with wooden bats. In this, the 1st Annual Negro League Appreciation Game, the Maritime Black Sox won, 11-1, in five innings, with pitcher Devont'e Lewis striking out 14 and allowing just one hit while going the distance.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 30, 1994
Every Sunday afternoon was golden. The athletes played only for love of the game. And the stands were always full of Baltimore fans -- the best sports fans in the world.That's pretty much the rose-colored view of "Gone But Not Forgotten II," another nostalgia-rama from Maryland Public Television. "Gone II," which airs at 8 tonight on Channels 22 and 67, revisits Maryland sports franchises and leagues from the 1930s to the '50s.Baltimore Sun columnist Dan Rodricks narrates the program. It's important for readers to know that I consider Rodricks a friend.
NEWS
July 25, 1992
YEARS AGO, Lipman Pike of the Baltimore nine was famous for his speed at beating out grounders.So one day when no game was scheduled, at old Newington Park in West Baltimore, the front office put on a footrace -- Pike versus a trotter named Clarence -- and hundreds of fans paid to watch.The mark of a student of Baltimore baseball has long been the ability to pronounce "Elite" correctly, as in Baltimore Elite Giants. (That is, Ee-lights.)A tougher challenge is to name some other local teams made up of black players.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 20, 1997
Fashionable tributeThe company that found such success with replicas of the Negro League's baseball caps is introducing an entire line of active wear. Just in time to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Jackie Robinson's debut in the major leagues, the San Francisco-based Blue Marlin now makes sweat hirts ($63) Henley tees ($60) and T-shirts ($22-$28) with Negro League insignia -- including the Baltimore Elite Giants and the Baltimore Black Sox. Their caps, like this Baltimore Black Sox hat, are priced in the $30 range.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Hubert V. Simmons was a gentle man who threw a nasty knuckleball in Negro Leagues baseball, and for years he dreamed of establishing a museum that could tell a story about the national pastime before it was really national, when black players were barred from the majors. He died two months before a small museum opened for appointments-only viewing in the basement of his church in Lochearn, but friends and family were sure he was there in spirit on Wednesday at the Baltimore County Public Library in Owings Mills for the announcement that the memorabilia collection would soon open there, and play to much bigger crowds.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
On a warm, sunny afternoon at the Maritime Industries Academy baseball field, posters honoring members of the Negro leagues hung on the outfield fence and dust swirled under the banner honoring Jackie Robinson at home plate. Members of the Maritime and Southside Academies wore gray and blue pin-striped replica uniform shirts of two teams that played in the NL — the Baltimore Black Sox (Maritime) and the Baltimore Elite Giants (Southside). And they played with wooden bats. In this, the 1st Annual Negro League Appreciation Game, the Maritime Black Sox won, 11-1, in five innings, with pitcher Devont'e Lewis striking out 14 and allowing just one hit while going the distance.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 19, 2009
Baltimore would become home to the first East Coast museum devoted to Negro League baseball teams and players, under a $4.1 million plan that has been approved by the Dixon administration. The plan calls for redeveloping Pennsylvania Avenue's historic Sphinx Club and adjacent properties with a sports-themed museum, entertainment and dining complex designed to draw tourists and help rejuvenate the corridor. The largest part of the project would be a three-story BALL House museum, which stands for Black Athletes and Lost Legends, at the northeast corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and Bloom Street.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 19, 2009
Baltimore would become home to the first East Coast museum devoted to Negro League baseball teams and players, under a $4.1 million plan that has been approved by the Dixon administration. The plan calls for redeveloping Pennsylvania Avenue's historic Sphinx Club and adjacent properties with a sports-themed museum, entertainment and dining complex designed to draw tourists and help rejuvenate the corridor. The largest part of the project would be a three-story BALL House museum, which stands for Black Athletes and Lost Legends, at the northeast corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and Bloom Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2009
How to Love Gordon Livingston, M.D. (DaCapo Press, 240 pages, $19.95) For Gordon Livingston, M.D., a Maryland psychiatrist and marriage counselor, empathy isn't just the secret of a happy marriage; it's also the secret of happiness. In his fourth book, he explains how we learn to love ourselves by loving others and becoming less self-absorbed. If you cultivate in yourself the characteristics you value in others, he says, you will find material success, enlightenment and marital happiness.
FEATURES
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 20, 1997
Fashionable tributeThe company that found such success with replicas of the Negro League's baseball caps is introducing an entire line of active wear. Just in time to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Jackie Robinson's debut in the major leagues, the San Francisco-based Blue Marlin now makes sweat hirts ($63) Henley tees ($60) and T-shirts ($22-$28) with Negro League insignia -- including the Baltimore Elite Giants and the Baltimore Black Sox. Their caps, like this Baltimore Black Sox hat, are priced in the $30 range.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | September 8, 1996
150 years ago in The SunSept. 9: Almost every-one that uses anthracite coal in this city, is grumbling at the high price of that article at the present time. At this time last year, it could be had at $5 per ton, delivered to the door. Now the price is $6, with an extra charge for delivery.Sept. 13: "The man who starves a horse degrades humanity." The same may be said of the man who abuses in any way the horse or any other dumb-beast.100 years ago in The SunSept. 9: The bicycle is becoming more and more conspicuous as efforts are made to adapt it to other uses besides a pleasure vehicle.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 30, 1994
Every Sunday afternoon was golden. The athletes played only for love of the game. And the stands were always full of Baltimore fans -- the best sports fans in the world.That's pretty much the rose-colored view of "Gone But Not Forgotten II," another nostalgia-rama from Maryland Public Television. "Gone II," which airs at 8 tonight on Channels 22 and 67, revisits Maryland sports franchises and leagues from the 1930s to the '50s.Baltimore Sun columnist Dan Rodricks narrates the program. It's important for readers to know that I consider Rodricks a friend.
NEWS
July 25, 1992
YEARS AGO, Lipman Pike of the Baltimore nine was famous for his speed at beating out grounders.So one day when no game was scheduled, at old Newington Park in West Baltimore, the front office put on a footrace -- Pike versus a trotter named Clarence -- and hundreds of fans paid to watch.The mark of a student of Baltimore baseball has long been the ability to pronounce "Elite" correctly, as in Baltimore Elite Giants. (That is, Ee-lights.)A tougher challenge is to name some other local teams made up of black players.
FEATURES
September 20, 2005
Shake hands with former stars of the Negro Leagues as part of "Forgotten Players: The Story of Negro League Baseball" today at the Cherry Hill branch of Enoch Pratt Free Library. Listen to stories from some of the greatest players of a generation. Guests include Al Burrows, former player and author of A Forgotten Negro League Star; Joe Durham, formerly of the Chicago American Giants and Baltimore Orioles; and Bert Simmons, formerly of the Baltimore Elite Giants, among others. Also enjoy an exhibit and video.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | December 5, 1999
There was a lot of fancy footwork at the Maryland Athletic Club recently, and we're not talking aerobics class.With a rock band set up on the basketball court, dancing was just one way folks could move at the Sweats & Sneakers Gala. Another was to hoof it through the parts of the club decorated to represent certain big cities; the gala's theme was "Dancing in the Streets." In "Miami," for example, guests could tour the new Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's cardiac rehab suite.Among the evening's "tourists": Julianne Carroll, event chair; Pat Cohen, Ray Daue, Susan Goodell, Bob Connelly, Laura Rubino, Chris Radebaugh and Kay Senft, event committee members; Phil Wendel, Liz and Tim Rhode, MAC co-owners; Dr. Ken Baughman, Johns Hopkins' chief of cardiology; Ernest Burke, former Baltimore Elite Giants player; and Jay Pivec, Pivec Advertising VP.The jamboree raised $10,000 for the Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
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