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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The Baltimore District of the Army Corps of Engineers furloughed 45 employees, closed its regulatory offices and suspended the review of pending permit applications after running out of funds, a spokesman said Tuesday. Spokesman Chris Augsburger said the district, which makes permit decisions on projects that affect wetlands and waters, had enough funding to continue operations until Tuesday. Now, he said, its review of permit applications has been suspended until new funding becomes available.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
A man was shot in the elbow in Northeast Baltimore on Thursday night, according to Baltimore Police. Officers responded to the 2900 block of Southern Avenue in the city's Lauraville neighborhood about 9:47 p.m. and found the injured man, police said. The man was transported to a nearby hospital for emergency care, police said. His injuries were not considered life-threatening late Thursday, police said. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call police at 410-396-2444.
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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | December 1, 2005
Alan B. Lipson, a retired Baltimore District Court judge and avid sailor, died Tuesday from complications of a stroke at the Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson. The former Guilford resident was 75. He was born in Providence, R.I., and moved with his family to Manchester, N.H., in 1939. While living there, he developed lifelong interests in skiing, sailing and tennis. After earning a bachelor's degree in economics in 1952 from the University of New Hampshire, he served in the Air Force for two years, and remained in the reserve, attaining the rank of captain.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
Marylanders seeking health care will still be protected from illegal conduct when they enter a health care facility even though the Massachusetts Reproductive Health Care Facilities Act was found unconstitutional by the Supreme Court last week. Our law prohibits conduct with the intent to prevent an individual from entering or exiting a medical facility by physically "detaining the individual or obstructing, impeding, or hindering the individual's passage. " This legislation, enacted in 1989, is not limited to reproductive health care facilities as was the Massachusetts law, and it explicitly excludes speech from the actions that are illegal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2000
Baltimore District Judge Martin A. Kircher Sr. died of cancer Tuesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Homeland resident was 69. Judge Kircher was a former member of the House of Delegates from the city's old 3rd District. "He was the dean of our bench because he had been there the longest," said Administrative Judge Keith E. Mathews. "He was highly thought of by both attorneys and his fellow judges, most of whom had trained under him. There is certainly a lot of him in us." "He was extremely compassionate to all defendants," said District Judge Barbara B. Waxman, who got to know Judge Kircher when she appeared before him as a young attorney 20 years ago. "He had a good heart, and he brought it to the bench."
NEWS
By Jeannie McDonald and Jeannie McDonald,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2002
Mail sent within Maryland is being delivered faster than mail within most other regions, despite the terrorist attacks that affected the Postal Service. In the Baltimore District, which encompasses most of the state, 94 percent of first-class mail sent within its boundaries was delivered overnight. The national average was 93 percent. Mail was tracked between Sept. 8 and Nov. 30, the first quarter of the U.S. Postal Service's fiscal year. The Baltimore District, which has headquarters across from the Shot Tower on East Fayette Street, handled about 722 million pieces of local first-class mail during that period, said Gary Colburn, a Postal Service spokesman.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF Staff writer Alec Klein contributed to this article | September 2, 1998
Maryland's highest court put state Sen. Clarence W. Blount's name back on the ballot yesterday for the Democratic primary, reversing a lower court's decision that "overwhelming" evidence showed he did not live in the Northwest Baltimore district he represents.The Court of Appeals issued a unanimous order 30 minutes after attorneys for Blount and his challenger, Del. Frank D. Boston Jr., finished arguing their cases.A full written opinion explaining the ruling is expected later.The ruling ended an expensive lawsuit filed by Boston seeking to have Blount's name stricken from the Democratic ballot because, Boston alleged, the senator lives in Pikesville.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1995
Imagine going to the post office and not having to get out of your car to stand in line for a postage stamp.Come tomorrow, you can stay in your car and use the new drive-through post office service by the Oakland Mills post office at 6801 Oak Hall Road to purchase stamps and money orders, and to mail letters and packages.The drive-through -- the second in the Baltimore District -- will not ... allow customers to apply for passports or pick up mail."We are trying to make it easier for our customers to do business with us and as pleasantly as possible," said Deborah Yackley, a postal spokeswoman.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 20, 1996
A $10.1 million dredging contract has been awarded to California-based Dutra Construction Co. Inc. by the Baltimore District of the Army Corps of Engineers.The company will dredge several waterways, including the Craighill, Brewerton and Tolchester channels.Pub Date: 9/20/96
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 16, 2000
A Mass Transit Administration bus driver has been found guilty of felony theft for illegally printing bus passes and giving them to others to sell on the black market, Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said yesterday. Wayne Allen Brownley, 35, of the 3900 block of Brenbrook Drive in Randallstown was found guilty Friday after a trial before Baltimore District Judge Kathleen M. Sweeney, who gave him a six-month suspended sentence, a year's probation and 50 hours of community service.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Most years, the last day of school comes with a sigh of relief, but this year what students and teachers describe is more akin to the body-draining feeling of finishing a marathon. "If I could frame it in one word I would just say 'exhausted,' " said Anna Gannon, a technology teacher at Gorman Crossing Elementary School in Howard County. "Whew. This has been the longest year ever," said Blair Todd, an eighth-grade history teacher at Charles Carroll Middle School in Prince George's County.
BUSINESS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
The Baltimore District of the Army Corps of Engineers furloughed 45 employees, closed its regulatory offices and suspended the review of pending permit applications after running out of funds, a spokesman said Tuesday. Spokesman Chris Augsburger said the district, which makes permit decisions on projects that affect wetlands and waters, had enough funding to continue operations until Tuesday. Now, he said, its review of permit applications has been suspended until new funding becomes available.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
What was the hardest lesson you've learned so far? "That kids grow up too fast. " What do you do to relax? "Go to the gym. " Your (other) dream job would be ... "Interior designer or kindergarten teacher. " What's on your playlist? "Citizen Cope, U2 and The Great Gatsby soundtrack. " What is your favorite book? "Anything historical. " What's your favorite vacation destination? "The beach anywhere!"
NEWS
May 20, 2013
There are flagrant, undefined loopholes in Maryland's abortion law. That's what letter writer Jeffrey D. Meister, director of administration and legislation for Maryland Right to Life, would have us think ("Maryland has de factor abortion on demand," May 17). What do "health" and a minor's "best interests" mean under Maryland's abortion law? Their plain meaning is derived from an ordinary understanding of the words, most often found in a dictionary. That's the analysis favored by Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
Howard Gary Bass, whose career as a Baltimore District Court judge spanned nearly three decades and who was known as something of a judicial free spirit for his application of humor to the law, died Tuesday afternoon at Good Samaritan Hospital after being stricken with a heart attack at his Homeland residence. Judge Bass was 70. On the day of his death, lawyers, judges and colleagues from across the state were preparing to honor him at a retirement dinner that evening at Sammy's Trattoria in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Paul Wilson Ramey, a member of the Army Corps of Engineers who was a founder of AIDS Action Baltimore, died of cancer Dec. 29 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 55 and lived in Hampden. Born and raised in Woodstock, Va., he was a 1975 graduate of Central High School who earned a civil engineering degree "with distinction" at Virginia Military Institute. He then served as a first lieutenant in the Army Reserves' transportation corps. After work at the Wilson T. Ballard engineering firm in Owings Mills, he practiced civil engineering at Whitman, Requardt and Associates from 1983 to 1991.
NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 15, 2000
A state Mass Transit Administration bus driver has been acquitted of charges he illegally printed bus passes, giving them to others to sell on the black market. Wayne Allen Brownley, 36, was cleared of the charges in Baltimore Circuit Court Tuesday. Brownley, of the 3900 block of Brenbrook Drive in Randallstown, was convicted of felony theft in May in Baltimore District Court but appealed and asked for a jury trial. "My client was just an innocent bus driver who thought a trusted employee was telling him the correct thing to do," said attorney Stuart J. Snyder.
NEWS
February 27, 2007
George Steuart Hupfer, who retired from the Army Corps of Engineers after helping design dams along the Susquehanna River, died Friday after undergoing heart surgery at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 81. Born in Walbrook and raised on Lyndhurst Avenue, he was a 1943 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School, where he played third base on the varsity baseball team. He enlisted in the Army at 17, fought in the Battle of the Bulge and participated in the occupation of Germany.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2012
Terrance Gough bought a king-size mattress, unpacked his clothes and arranged the bedroom in his uncle's Southwest Baltimore home just the way he liked it. The 26-year-old never got a chance to sleep in the bed, however: he was gunned down the next afternoon at an intersection around the corner, one of 11 people added to the city's growing list of homicide victims over the past nine days. "That was the first night he was going to stay here," said Gough's uncle, Andre Foote, 44. "He was shot twice, once in the heart, once in the lung.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | June 12, 2012
The John R. Hargrove Sr. building of Baltimore's district court closed shortly after 9 a.m. Tuesday because of a nearby water main break that left the facility without water. It's unclear when the building,  on the 700 block of E. Patapsco Ave.,  will reopen and resume hearing cases. Bail reviews were transferred to the Borgerding district court location at 5800 Wabash Ave, and other cases were postponed, said judiciary spokeswoman Terri Bolling. The water main break occurred on the 3600 block of Brooklyn Ave., Bolling said.
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