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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
Brenda McKenzie, who heads the economic development division of the Boston Redevelopment Authority, has been chosen to lead the Baltimore Development Corp. “I'm bullish on Baltimore,” McKenzie said after she was introduced Monday afternoon by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake at City Hall. McKenzie said that as the president and CEO of the city's quasi-public economic development arm, she would encourage transparency and that she plans to have an open door and open phone line.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The longtime head of the Mayor's Office of Employment Development plans to retire in January. Karen Sitnick, 64, who has worked for the city for more than 30 years, was appointed director of the $24.9 million, 191-person agency in 2000. During her tenure, the department worked with the city school system and the Johns Hopkins University to establish schools with a focus on careers and equipping students with work experience. She launched Baltimore's Youth Opportunity program in 2000, focused on connecting at-risk youth with a suite of services, from academic support and job training to health care.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
Until last month, M.J. "Jay" Brodie was the only person to hold the title of president of the Baltimore Development Corp. since it was organized in the mid-1990s into its current form, with a largely private-sector board of directors. What the city's nonprofit, economic development agency became during his time at the helm allowed for some of Baltimore's most admired economic progress in recent years, including the construction of Harbor East and the public offering of stock by Millennial Media Inc., the mobile advertising company that got its legs with help from a technology incubator founded during Brodie's tenure.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Fifteen people have applied to fill the vacant 11th District seat on Baltimore City's Council, according to the office of City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young.  They are:  Melanie A. Ambridge, a former board member of the South Baltimore Neighborhood Association Darroll Cribb,  CEO of The Humanitarian, Inc. Eric T. Costello, president of the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association  Julie K. Dunham Howie, a development...
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
When the new head of the Baltimore Development Corp. started 15 months ago, she replaced a man who'd become synonymous with development in the city and accepted the task of changing the agency's focus from real estate deals to economic strategy. Much of Brenda McKenzie's first year, however, has been consumed by projects she inherited, such as winning approval of controversial tax-increment financing for infrastructure at Harbor Point. Many observers said McKenzie, who came to Baltimore from a similar job in Boston, has yet to place her stamp on the agency, one of the most complex and controversial in the city and one not used to change after 16 years under the leadership of M.J. "Jay" Brodie.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels told the Baltimore Development Corp. board Thursday that the academic powerhouse has a moral obligation to "share our bounty" with the city. Daniels said that he sees Hopkins students, faculty and staff as privileged and that each has a responsibility to help revitalize Baltimore by addressing homelessness, preparing children for good jobs, ending violence and reversing significant health problems. "You can't sequester our institutions from the community," Daniels told the development board at its monthly meeting.
NEWS
December 15, 1995
JAY BRODIE WAS Baltimore's housing commissioner in the 1970s at a time when urban homesteading and other innovations created a feeling of optimism about the city's future. His return to local government as president of the Baltimore Development Corp. shows Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is serious about correcting some of the past deficiencies of his administration.To further enhance BDC's credibility as a professional organization, Mayor Schmoke authorized the termination of Shapiro and Olander as the agency's chief counsel.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1997
WITH development activity heating up east of Baltimore's Inner Harbor, civic leaders plan to hire an urban design expert to help coordinate it all.The Baltimore Development Corp. sought bids this year from urban experts who would like to be consultants for the design study, set to begin this spring.The study area is bounded by the Inner Harbor on the south; Frederick Street on the west; East Baltimore Street on the north; and Central Avenue on the east. Attractions include the old city fish market; the Brokerage at 34 Market Place; the new city police headquarters annex; Museum Row and the Inner Harbor East Metro stop.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
M.J. "Jay" Brodie, who has headed Baltimore's economic development agency under four mayors and helped shepherd projects such as the Harbor East redevelopment, said Thursday he plans to retire. The Baltimore native and former city housing commissioner is credited with overseeing initiatives to create thousands of jobs and to attract and keep hundreds of businesses in the city during his 16 years as president of the Baltimore Development Corp., the city's quasi-public economic development arm. Brodie, viewed as highly influential in city development, also has drawn criticism from residents and business owners who have complained about being pushed out by urban renewal and about the secrecy under which they say his agency has operated.
NEWS
By Robbie Whelan and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 31, 2010
Four of Baltimore's 10 Main Streets initiatives would be eliminated under proposed budget cuts to the city's economic development arm. Officials from the quasi-public Baltimore Development Corp., which works to create and retain jobs and redevelop commercial property in the city, outlined a scaled-back version of the agency's activities for Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake at a budget hearing Tuesday. The Main Streets program, which is based on a plan developed by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, makes grants to small businesses for facade and streetscape improvements as a way of attracting more business and foot traffic to certain areas of the city.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake appointed two-term City Councilman William H. Cole IV on Thursday to lead the Baltimore Development Corp., the quasi-public agency charged with revitalizing the city. The appointment came as BDC President Brenda McKenzie said that she was resigning this month for "personal" and "family" reasons, less than two years after she came to Baltimore from Boston. Cole, 41, who lives in the Federal Hill area and represents South Baltimore on the City Council, will have to step down from that position.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Kamel Mahadin visited Baltimore 30 years ago as a graduate student studying landscape architecture at Louisiana State University. He returned Wednesday as the head of an ambitious, multibillion-dollar effort to build out Jordan's lone waterfront city into a tourist hub and expanded port. "Thirty years ago, when I visited … this was a slum area," said Mahadin, chief commissioner of the Aqaba Special Economic Zone Authority. "Why Baltimore? It's a waterfront development. … We want to see success story.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Baltimore officials approved a $3.4 million deal Wednesday to sell a Fells Point pier for development of a luxury hotel after chiding a developer for trying to include campaign contributions to local politicians as part of the project's costs. Recreation Pier Developers listed contributions to City Councilman James B. Kraft and Del. Peter A. Hammen as part of the more than $3 million it has spent on the project, including the $2 million purchase of the Recreational Pier on Thames Street from the city in 2010.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Real estate developer Duke Realty is moving forward with plans for a second Amazon distribution center next to the massive warehouse the online retailer announced last fall - possibly for its growing grocery operation, Amazon Fresh. The city's Building Department issued a permit for a new 345,000-square-foot, one-story warehouse located at 5501 Holabird Ave. that could employ about 325 people during peak hours. The Planning Department's site plan review committee approved the proposal in January.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
When the new head of the Baltimore Development Corp. started 15 months ago, she replaced a man who'd become synonymous with development in the city and accepted the task of changing the agency's focus from real estate deals to economic strategy. Much of Brenda McKenzie's first year, however, has been consumed by projects she inherited, such as winning approval of controversial tax-increment financing for infrastructure at Harbor Point. Many observers said McKenzie, who came to Baltimore from a similar job in Boston, has yet to place her stamp on the agency, one of the most complex and controversial in the city and one not used to change after 16 years under the leadership of M.J. "Jay" Brodie.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The city Wednesday asked for proposals from developers for about a dozen city-owned parcels in a state-designated historic district on the west side, where many blocks have lain dormant for years. The Baltimore Development Corp.'s two requests for proposals include four buildings in the middle of the 400 block of N. Howard St. and nine buildings and an open lot in an area roughly bounded by Park Avenue and Liberty, Clay and Marion streets. Responses can target individual properties or describe plans for wholesale development of the clusters, a choice city officials said they have opened in response to private sector interest in smaller-scale projects, which can be easier to finance.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and By Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | December 24, 2001
Baltimore's Inner Harbor already enjoys a reputation as an urban success story, but many of the country's leading designers are eager to help make it even better. Fourteen teams have expressed interest in formulating a new master plan for the Inner Harbor, after the Baltimore Development Corp. issued a formal request this fall. The bidders range from local firms such as RTKL Associates and Design Collective to nationally prominent designers such as Skidmore Owings & Merrill and Cooper Robertson and Partners - two firms that have been hired to redesign the former site of the World Trade Center towers in lower Manhattan.
NEWS
December 12, 2013
I see that the Baltimore Development Corp. has hired a Texas-based consultant to "develop a strategy [for Baltimore City] to improve its business climate" ( "City to study ways to improve Baltimore's economic and business climate," Dec. 3). In a previous letter I described the city's lack of interest in aiding its existing small businesses and the loss of such businesses. As a result of that letter, I received correspondence from four local or family owned businesses with a combined 300 years of operation in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
The Baltimore Development Corp. will pay a Texas-based consultant up to $167,500 to develop a strategy for the city to improve its economic and business climate, the mayor's office announced Tuesday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said the effort is intended to bolster job creation, revitalize neighborhoods and attract new investment. The consultant, AngelouEconomics, will include input from local businesses, community leaders and city residents in its plan. A series of public forums is scheduled over the next week, beginning with a session on Tuesday.
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