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By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 1995
Eva Anderson's Baltimore Dance Theatre is marking its 20th anniversary in a city in which dance companies have a precarious existence. Not only did the concert at the Baltimore Museum of Arts Saturday night attest to Ms. Anderson's perseverance of spirit, but the nearly packed house also confirmed her popularity.The event also served as a ceremony -- as the torch of the company's artistic director was passed from Ms. Anderson to longtime company member Dr. Charles Carter.Featured on this program was Ms. Anderson's "Beginnings," which premiered last spring, plus excerpts from several of her other works.
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By Lily Hua and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
The word ballet conjures up images of tutus and ballet flats, but the men on this ballet fusion dance company prove that ballet can be more than productions of "Swan Lake. " Starring on the June 17 episode of “America's Got Talent” is a ballet fusion dance team from Baltimore called Bad Boys of Dance. The episode airs at 8 p.m.  Renowned dancer Rasta Thomas founded the dance company in 2007. According to the Bad Boys of Dance website, the company does 250 shows a year with a rotation of about 25-50 dancers a season.
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FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin | December 29, 1991
Baltimore's dance scene had a lot of movement during 1991 . . . and not just on stage.The most noticable moves were those of the Maryland Ballet. Faced with a troubled bank account and a fickle audience that equated ballet with toe shoes and tutus, the company canceled its spring performances at the Baltimore Museum of Art, resurfaced in May with a short-lived association with Loyola College, then more or less disbanded -- although at its offices and ballet...
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
At the 2:17 mark of Britney Spears' 2011 hit single "Hold It Against Me," dubstep entered the mainstream. It had been bubbling around pop's surface before Spears put her glossy touch on it, but this was Top 40's most blatant — and effective — use of the increasingly popular electronic dance music sub-genre. As Spears' vocals cut out, the track builds to a climactic "breakdown," signified by dubstep's trademark bass wobble. It's deep enough to crush your chest, and it's a huge part of what makes the genre so appealing: A song builds and builds until the rug is suddenly ripped from under it, only to re-form.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin | December 30, 1990
THUMBS UP Alvin Ailey Dance Theatre kicks off Baltimore residency. Hopefully a boost for area dance.Dance on the Edge series. Brought outstanding talent to Baltimore.Next Ice Age. Choreographically inspired.Hubbard Street Dancers. Chicago's best-kept secret.Path Dance Company. High-geared performances.Baltimore Dance Theater. Artfully combined dance and sculpture.THUMBS DOWN Baltimore Dance Network. Area troupes need organizational support.Kinetics. "Spartacus" was not ready for prime time.
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By J.L. Conklin and J.L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | October 5, 1994
The second showcase of local modern dance companies, seen at the Baltimore Museum of Art Saturday night, was a notch above last year's endeavor in both professionalism and choreographic invention.The three companies that performed were the Baltimore Dance Collaborative, Nancy Havlik's Dance Performance Group and Chris Dohse/Toothmother.One of the stronger works on the program of nine dances was "Vow: A Line Dance for Women, Black Dresses and Popular Culture" by Baltimore Dance Collaborative's Kathleen Murphy.
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By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | February 7, 2008
Choreographers Doug Hamby and Carol Hess don't know exactly how to explain their nonverbal works. They're not even sure if their pieces really have specific messages. But they do know that they want audiences of Baltimore Dance Project in Concert to leave the auditorium with a greater appreciation for the body and its movement potential. "The human body can birth so many ideas visually," said Hamby, co-creative director of Baltimore Dance Project and associate professor of dance at University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
FEATURES
By J.L. Conklin and J.L. Conklin,Contributing Writer | October 18, 1993
"Dancers at a Gathering," seen Saturday night at the Baltimore Museum of Art, was tantamount to throwing a window open to let in the fresh air. The works of three local groups -- The Baltimore Dance Collaborative under the direction of Marsha Tallerico, Nancy Havlik's Dance Performance Group and Chris Dohse's Toothmother -- were featured on a program of nine XTC dances. They included Mr. Dohse's surrealistic excerpt from "delivered free in heaven together" where a dead bluefish was Mr. Dohse's dance partner; Baltimore Dance Collaborative's emotionally attuned diptych that juxtaposed Kathleen Murphy's "Opening" with Patricia Almirez's "somewhere I have never travelled"; and Ms. Havlik's well-constructed abstract study, "Walls and Doors Back 2 Sq. 1."
FEATURES
By Pat van den Beemt | November 25, 1990
The joint was jumpin' on a recent Saturday night as 200 people twirled, spun, jitterbugged and did the Lindy hop at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Baltimore.The dancers, who switched partners as often as the band changed big band tunes, were breathless and exhilarated.Swing dancing is back and drawing in people too young to remember the dances' beginnings."There's a lot of theories, but I think swing dancing is popular now because there's been a cultural revolution," says Leslie Coombs, founder of Swing Baltimore, a group that holds dances the second Saturday of each month.
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By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | September 10, 1995
If you want to see truly exceptional, big-name dance this year, you'll have to hop in your car and head south on I-95. Major league dance companies are coming to the area -- such as the Joffrey Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, the Martha Graham Company or the Jose Limon Company -- but they'll be appearing in Washington.Despite the fact Baltimore is not a required stop for most national companies, it does have a dance scene.Several local dance companies will perform -- in spite of funding problems and inconsistent audience development.
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By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | June 30, 2008
Louise Muse, a dance instructor who taught ballet to hundreds of Baltimore students for nearly five decades, died Friday at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 91. Raised in Dundalk, Ms. Muse began teaching at Estelle Dennis' dance studio in the 1950s after spending several years as a student under the legendary instructor. Ms. Muse taught girls from nearby St. Peter's school at the studio's original site in Towson as well as adults, according to Joan Shnipper, a former student. The studio moved to 13 W. Mount Vernon Place in 1966, where Ms. Shnipper said Ms. Muse kept teaching until she was 85. Many of the day-to-day operations of the studio were handled by Ms. Muse, and she took over entirely after Ms. Dennis died in 1996.
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By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | February 7, 2008
Choreographers Doug Hamby and Carol Hess don't know exactly how to explain their nonverbal works. They're not even sure if their pieces really have specific messages. But they do know that they want audiences of Baltimore Dance Project in Concert to leave the auditorium with a greater appreciation for the body and its movement potential. "The human body can birth so many ideas visually," said Hamby, co-creative director of Baltimore Dance Project and associate professor of dance at University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2005
Eva Anderson watches her own image appear on the television monitor in the kitchen of her Columbia home - the powerful energy of the dance caught in her figure straining under a taut cloth, like a swan snared in a net. "I like cloth," she says. "I like Spandex especially because it can do things. It can dance almost by itself, if you manipulate it right." Anderson is previewing the documentary Chronicles of a Dancer: How We Became Artists, a video retrospective of the 32 seasons of the Eva Anderson Dancers, which will premiere today at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Anderson, who has always been a creative, inventive choreographer, has been a wizard at keeping a professional dance company afloat for three decades in Maryland.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | April 24, 2003
Dance Baltimore! really will be a movable feast. The free, daylong celebration of choreographed movement Saturday will feature master classes, a young people's matinee and an evening show drawing upon Baltimore-area professional dance troupes specializing in modern, ballet, jazz, hip-hop, ethnic, period and tap/percussive dance. There will be performances by daring young men and women on flying trapezes representing Air Bernasconi, and the renowned Eva Anderson Dancers, an African-American troupe that has toured Europe.
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By These listings were compiled by Lori Sears | November 29, 2001
'NUTCRACKERS' Towson University Dance Company. 8 p.m. Nov. 29-30 and Dec. 1; 3 p.m. Dec. 2. Towson University, Stephens Hall Theatre, 8000 York Road. $10-$15. 410-704-2787. Harford Dance Theatre. Abbreviated version. 5 p.m. Nov. 30; 3 p.m. Dec. 1-2. Full-length version. 8 p.m. Nov. 30-Dec. 1. Harford Community College, Amoss Center, 200 Thomas Run Road, Bel Air. $5-$15. 410-836-4211. Baltimore School for the Arts. 7 p.m. Nov. 30 and Dec. 7; 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Dec. 1 and Dec. 8; 2 p.m. Dec. 2 and Dec. 9. Baltimore School for the Arts, Schaefer Ballroom, 712 Cathedral St. $6-$10.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1999
Evelyn Tapolow Holzman, a dancer in Broadway revues in the 1920s who later ran a West Baltimore dance school, died of natural causes Friday at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital. She was 91 and lived in Northwest Baltimore.The former Evelyn Calmen grew up in Baltimore, the daughter of an Orthodox Jewish store owner, and graduated from Eastern High School.She studied to be a physical education teacher at then-Towson State Normal School, but dropped out in 1927 to study dance in New York and join the Earl Carroll Vanities, a musical revue that toured the United States and Canada.
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By Judith Green | September 18, 1997
Eva Anderson Dancers, aka the Baltimore Dance Company when it performs in Baltimore, does so this weekend: performs in Baltimore, that is, at the Baltimore Museum of Art.Anderson's Columbia-based company, now in its 20th season, uses many African-American elements in its work, from music to design to themes, but describes itself as more modern than ethnic.In this weekend's program, the company presents the spectrum of its repertory.From Anderson, there are "When Dudes Walk," a light work to a contemporary ragtime score by Don Pullen; and "Kadija," whose name comes from the dominant rhythmic pattern of its music.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2005
Eva Anderson watches her own image appear on the television monitor in the kitchen of her Columbia home - the powerful energy of the dance caught in her figure straining under a taut cloth, like a swan snared in a net. "I like cloth," she says. "I like Spandex especially because it can do things. It can dance almost by itself, if you manipulate it right." Anderson is previewing the documentary Chronicles of a Dancer: How We Became Artists, a video retrospective of the 32 seasons of the Eva Anderson Dancers, which will premiere today at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Anderson, who has always been a creative, inventive choreographer, has been a wizard at keeping a professional dance company afloat for three decades in Maryland.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1999
Three New York men were arrested and charged with opening fire and wounding five people early yesterday morning in a Southeast Baltimore dance hall packed with 450 patrons who came for a fashion show and dance.Police said one of the suspects might be a member of the New York-based rap group Pitched Black, which had been performing. The three suspects were arrested in a 1999 Mercedes-Benz in which police said they found two semiautomatic handguns.None of the victims was seriously wounded in the shooting, which occurred at 1 a.m. yesterday at Sher-Wes Gardens, a former bingo hall in the 1700 block of Dundalk Ave.All were released from area hospitals by yesterday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | September 18, 1997
Eva Anderson Dancers, aka the Baltimore Dance Company when it performs in Baltimore, does so this weekend: performs in Baltimore, that is, at the Baltimore Museum of Art.Anderson's Columbia-based company, now in its 20th season, uses many African-American elements in its work, from music to design to themes, but describes itself as more modern than ethnic.In this weekend's program, the company presents the spectrum of its repertory.From Anderson, there are "When Dudes Walk," a light work to a contemporary ragtime score by Don Pullen; and "Kadija," whose name comes from the dominant rhythmic pattern of its music.
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