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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
This week, the Washington Post is running a series on how police work to seize cash during car stops without a warrant or making an arrest -- and data compiled by the paper suggests Baltimore City and Baltimore County police are among the biggest financial beneficiaries of the controversial tactic. Under a federal program, police departments can get payouts when they seize cash. And since 2001 the two Maryland departments each received $7 million taken from motorists and others, according to the Post's analysis.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Priscilla Fuller Menzies, an equine painter whose subjects included the fabled thoroughbreds Native Dancer and Secretariat, died of complications from a stroke Aug. 24 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The former Butler resident was 94. Born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville and Upperco, she was the daughter of Perry Wade Fuller, a stamp and coin dealer, and Anita Sherwood Fuller, a sports enthusiast. She was a 1938 graduate of Garrison Forest School. She earned a bachelor's degree at what is now the Maryland Institute College of Art and studied with Jacques Maroger, a French-born painter who explored the own paint medium using old techniques and had been on the staff of the Louvre.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
The state has awarded more than $2 million in grants to improve bike paths across Maryland, including more than $80,000 to better connect West Baltimore with downtown. The new funding for the state's Bikeways Program was announced Friday by the Maryland Department of Transportation, which administers the program aimed at encouraging biking to work, school and other activities. "Establishing a modern transportation system is more than building roadways, runways and railways," Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Seven years after the University of Baltimore admitted its first freshman class, new President Kurt L. Schmoke is considering a return to the school's roots as an upper-division college that enrolled only juniors and seniors. The enrollment growth that came with the first underclassmen in 2007 has stagnated. UB enrolls about 200 freshmen each fall, and the university still attracts mostly transfers and graduate students. In an interview Friday, Schmoke spoke of flat public funding and a need to work more efficiently.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
The Baltimore County Police Department plans to renovate its indoor shooting range in Lutherville after being cited for exposing employees to high concentrations of lead. Maryland Occupational Safety and Health issued the citations in May after finding that the ventilation system operated poorly and other protections against lead exposure, such as regular disposal of combustible waste, were not in place. Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said the department is evaluating plans to improve ventilation.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Federal authorities are searching for a 34-year-old man wanted for allegedly smuggling heroin from Malaysia inside a children's stroller — and twice eluding police. Adedeji Abiodun Ajala, of Windsor Mill, is charged with conspiracies related to importing, possessing and distributing a controlled substance. Authorities had been searching for Ajala after monitoring a package mailed from Malaysia in late July to Baltimore. Inside the package, authorities found heroin sewn into the fabric of a stroller, according to court records.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
It was important to look your best. After all, The Beatles were in town. Today, it's hard to believe such things were important. But for four 15-year-old girls from Highlandtown, preparing to head into downtown Baltimore for a rock concert, such matters were vital. Who knew what could happen? "In my mind, I thought for sure that Paul's gonna love me, he's gonna see me - in my little-girl fantasies, he'll know that eventually he'll marry me," explains Judy Comotto, now 65 and recently retired from running the continuing education program at Roland Park Country School , then 15 and, as Judy Troch , a star-struck teen totally in love with The Beatles.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
DNA recovered from a blanket taken from a crime scene decades ago has helped prosecutors bring charges against a Baltimore man they say raped and killed a 75-year-old woman in 1981. Phillip D. Lee, 55, is charged with first-degree murder and first-degree sex offense in the death of Anna Dorthea Smith. He has been held since mid-August without bail. Police and prosecutors announced his indictment Friday. The indictment "highlights the power of DNA analysis, which led us to this defendant," Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein said.
NEWS
Staff reports, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
The Baltimore County Department of Public Works is closing both southbound lanes along York Road north of Timonium Road near the entrance to the State Fairgrounds Thursday night beginning at 8 p.m. Officials said all southbound York Road traffic will be shifted into the center turn lane for a short distance as crews work to tie-in a water line. Northbound York Road traffic will not be affected. County officials said they anticipate opening both southbound lanes by 6 a.m., though they have indicated lane closures through the Friday morning rush hour are possible.
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