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NEWS
September 15, 2014
This week on Crime Scene Matt Jablow looks at the murder of a young man who was a leader in the classroom and on the lacrosse field at the Community College of Baltimore County in Catonsville. Devin Cook, 20, was shot down in Baltimore's Park Heights neighborhood this past July after giving some teammates a ride home after practice.  Police are still looking for clues to the identify of the killer.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Baltimore County police continue to search for the second suspect in a double killing in Rosedale last month. Charles William Mitter, 39, and Tyray Avia Wise, 26, were stabbed more than 70 times in a dispute over $25,000, investigators wrote in court documents. Mitter also was shot several times. Police charged Carlos Lomax, 45, a few days after the killings. But police said Lomax, who is Mitter's stepbrother, had an accomplice. The second suspect is described only as a black man, 5-foot-7 to 5-foot-8, wearing a black jumpsuit with white socks, according to charging documents filed in District Court.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Berean E. "Bill" Talbert, who founded a Baltimore County landscaping company and fought in Europe during World War II, died Tuesday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 93. The son of Richard H. Talbert, a textile mill worker, and Stella M. Talbert, a homemaker, Berean Earl Talbert was born and raised in Leaksville, N.C., which is now Eden, N.C. He was a 1937 graduate of Leaksville High School. During World War II, Mr. Talbert served with Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s 3rd Army in Europe, where he was a fire control director with a Howitzer artillery unit.
NEWS
By a Sun staff reporter | September 13, 2014
Baltimore County police are investigating the death of a person whose body was found Saturday afternoon in Middle River. At 2:45 p.m., police and fire workers responded to an area near the 9000 block of Pulaski Highway in Middle River after receiving a report of a cardiac arrest. Officers found a body in a wooded area. The person's identity is not known, police said. The body was taken to the medical examiner's office for an autopsy. Police have classified the investigation as a suspicious death and are trying to determine whether foul play was involved.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The fall fundraising party season revs into high gear next weekend with a plethora of big shindigs that can cost big bucks to attend - all for a worthy cause, of course. From the Night of 100 Elvises to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Gala, tickets can go from $26 to $5,000 each. With such a broad range, you might wonder what goes into setting the price. Why does one hoopla cost so little, and another so much? Certainly, there are expenses to cover. A fancy gala that offers hors d'oeuvres, open bar, a gourmet sit-down dinner and live dance music is going to cost the organizers a lot more than a party that might have local restaurants and liquor distributors donating their wares at food stations, with a cash bar. But, there are a few more factors that go into the mix. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Maryland Chapter is one of the busiest nonprofits, with seven major parties a year, says Ann Krulevitz, the chapter's associate executive director.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Firefighters quickly controlled a blaze at an abandoned Veteran's Affairs hospital at Fort Howard in Edgemere, Baltimore County public safety officials said late Friday. The two-alarm fire took place around 11 p.m. and was under control by 11:30 p.m., according to tweets from the Baltimore County Police and Fire Department. The building is located in the 9600 block of North Point Rd. The fire was contained to one building. This story will be updated when information becomes available.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Gerald Wiseberg makes for an unlikely drug kingpin, but federal authorities say the 81-year-old Korean War veteran helped run an operation that doled out vast amounts of powerful prescription painkillers. Wiseberg and his business partners opened a clinic in Baltimore County in early 2011, soon after the Drug Enforcement Administration raided a similar operation he ran in Florida. Wiseberg's office here attracted droves of former customers from other states, according to a federal indictment that was unsealed Friday charging them with a drug conspiracy.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
I must say I found reporter Michael Dresser 's perspective on the Baltimore County executive's race quite unbalanced ( "Baltimore County executive race is financial mismatch," Aug. 26). Mismatch, there most definitely is. And I believe the people of Baltimore County will without question be all the better as a result of it. One may find truth in the description of "an increasingly Democratic-leaning county. " However, the "power of incumbency" leaves County Executive Kevin Kamenetz standing alone to atone for his style of management in the eyes of Baltimore County voters.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | September 11, 2014
When it comes to policing, in some places less is better than more. Fewer police departments can result in better protection and better service. In places like Ferguson, Mo., hostility toward the police would be far less likely if the parent St. Louis County had fewer police departments - or even better, only one. County governments have evolved over time by a variety of ways, with a tendency toward more centralization. The particular form local government takes matters a great deal.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
The tall ships - old showboats that they are - danced into Baltimore looking regal and festooned, the stateliest of guests at an affair expected to bring President Barack Obama to Baltimore. "It's a ballet, with a couple hard-rock pieces in the middle," said Mike McGeady, president of Sail Baltimore, of the intense maritime choreography used to welcome dozens of Star-Spangled Spectacular ships into the waters around Baltimore on Wednesday without disrupting commercial port trade.
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