Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBaltimore County Executive
IN THE NEWS

Baltimore County Executive

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2010
Baltimore County Executive candidates Kevin Kamenetz and Kenneth C. Holt aired competing views on the budget, schools and economic development in a forum at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County Tuesday night, as the Democrat Kamenetz defended the current administration's record of management and the Republican Holt insisted more could be done to save money. County Councilman Kamenetz, 52, a lawyer from Owings Mills who has served on the council since 1994, touted the county's record of balanced budgets, Triple-A ratings with the three major bond rating services and avoiding the layoffs and furloughs that have hit other jurisdictions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 8, 2014
With the midterm elections just weeks away, I was reminded of a comment by Abraham Lincoln: "Elections belong to the people. It's their decision. If they decide to turn their back on the fire and burn their behinds, then they will just have to sit on their blisters. " When it comes to voting, the electorate has three choices: Stay at home and sit it out; accept things as they are; or act on a desire for change. Does one vote really matter? Consider that in the recent Republican primary election for Baltimore County executive, candidate George Harman won by just 18 votes.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2010
Republican Kenneth C. Holt, a Kingsville farmer and financial adviser who served one term in the House of Delegates, will officially declare his candidacy for Baltimore County Executive today. Republican Kenneth C. Holt, a Kingsville farmer and financial adviser who served one term in the House of Delegates, will officially file his candidacy for Baltimore County executive on Tuesday. Holt, 58, said he hopes to benefit from a burgeoning anti-incumbency sentiment. "People basically want a change in leadership," Holt said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | August 26, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz ended the most recent campaign finance reporting period with just over $1 million in the bank. His Republican rival, George Harman, reported just under $3,000. What the two have in common is that they both filed their reports well before Tuesday night's midnight deadline. This year's executive race was never expected to be particularly close, but Kamenetz'  roughly 333-1 advantage illustrates the power of incumbency in an increasingly Democratic-leaning county.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2010
Kevin B. Kamenetz was sworn in Monday as Baltimore County executive, vowing to bring a vision of prosperity and opportunity to neighborhoods and to lead the county in reclaiming its mantle as the "ideas county. " "Change is inevitable, but progress is optional," the 52-year-old attorney said during his inaugural address to a crowd of 1,500. "Throughout its history, the people of Baltimore County have consistently chosen the path of progress. Progress is built by creative people with new ideas.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1994
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden has begun a two- to four-week recuperation at a relative's home from brain surgery he underwent May 24 at Johns Hopkins Hospital.Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, R-2nd, visited him Sunday, his last full day at Hopkins, and said yesterday that he seemed to be recovering nicely from what a long, perhaps 10-hour operation."The swelling had still not gone down," she said, but Mr. Hayden was alert and walking around, and reported some small improvement in his right-side vision loss.
NEWS
February 7, 1996
IN HIS FIRST year as Baltimore County executive, C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III has sailed over some of the same bumps in the road that gave so much pain to his predecessor, but the Cockeysville lawyer better knows the treacherous road of county government and is, consequently, a better navigator.His nine years on the County Council served him well in dealing with that body. He has shown himself open to consultation with employee unions that were ignored by Roger Hayden, and paid particular attention to the hiring of county managers, who can make or break political reputations.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
An article in the Friday Sun about the proposed increase in the piggyback tax for Baltimore County residents said that for someone earning $50,000 a year, the increase would total $83 annually.That figure was based on numbers provided by County Budget Director Fred Homan, who assumed a net taxable income of $35,000, a figure which reflects the average net taxable income among residents with varying deductions in a recent year.Currently, state income tax is 5 percent of net taxable income.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
Last week's abrupt announcement of a plan to more than double the size of the main jail in Towson to 1,737 inmate beds illustrates the expansive power wielded by Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger. For years, officials have known that the jails scattered across the county seat were either dangerously overcrowded or functionally obsolete. Some inmates were squeezed three to a cell. Others contended with balky heating and lack of air conditioning. And for years, leaders have avoided the thorny question of where a new jail would be built, focusing instead on more popular priorities such as new schools and roads.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III, the overweight, over-eager Baltimore County executive, has a reputation as a man quick with a smile and a handshake, a politician who uses his personal charm to quietly solve problems.But in recent weeks, Mr. Ruppersberger has shown other traits -- a toughness and a pride on display for the first time since he became county executive a year ago.That aggressive, in-your-face competitiveness has been there since his high school football and lacrosse days at Baltimore's City College, and longtime friends and colleagues aren't surprised to see it now.They're not surprised by his campaign to block a plan that would move hundreds of poor black families from inner-city public housing to the suburbs -- a campaign that continues even after the county won significant concessions this week.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
A Republican candidate for Baltimore County executive has asked to recount ballots after he lost the party's primary by a margin of only 18 votes. Tony Campbell, of Towson, made the request Thursday, according to county election director Katie Brown. Following the June 24 primary election, Campbell barely trailed candidate George Harman, of Reisterstown. "It is important for citizens in a democratic republic to know that their votes count," Campbell said in a statement. More than 20,000 votes were cast in the race, and because the margin was so slim, officials did not finish counting all ballots until Monday.
NEWS
May 28, 2014
Your editorial clearly defines the problem we face in Baltimore County government - the abundance of special interest money in the hands of elected officials with less than altruistic intentions ( "Kamenetz the kingmaker," May 23). Big money is a prime reason for my campaign against the current administration which often operates in opposition to my ethical beliefs. Indeed, to simply sit back and watch the Kamenetz administration act in a less than honorable manner to individuals, community groups and county employees was a determining factor in my decision to enter the race for Baltimore County Executive.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
For the third election in a row, a Baltimore County executive has the potential to play kingmaker in elections for other local offices, thanks both to what has been one of the most gaping loopholes in campaign finance law and the inability of the Republican Party to put up a credible candidate in what was once the key jurisdiction in its efforts at state-wide competitiveness. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz has amassed at least $123,000 in an election slate he controls, all of which he can transfer to other slate members, of which there is presently only one: his favored candidate in a contested County Council primary.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Once again this year, Maryland politicians and business people will travel to Las Vegas for the Global Retail Real Estate Convention - a three-day deal-making event beginning May 18. It's considered a "who's who" event, where the worlds of government and business mix among the glitz and glamour of casinos and parties. In all, 669 Marylanders will be in attendance, including 10 from Baltimore's government. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young, Council Vice President Edward Reisinger and Councilman Carl Stokes are all slated to make the trip.
NEWS
April 23, 2014
Baltimore County Circuit Judge Michael J. Finifter knows how to get County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's attention. A year and a half after Maryland's highest court upheld an arbitrator's decision that Baltimore County had overcharged a group of police department retirees for their health insurance benefits and owed them recompense, the county still has not paid and is working its hardest to avoid ever doing so. Now Mr. Finifter has threatened to hold...
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
WASHINGTON -- Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger will make a decision about whether to seek the Democratic nomination for governor next month -- an effort he would undertake to ensure a Baltimore-area candidate is in the race, he said in an interview with The Washington Post . "A lot of people have said, 'Dutch, you've got to do this,'" Ruppersberger told The Post . "It's good to have representation from both sides of the state. It's good to have a balance. " The former Baltimore County executive has been flirting with the idea of his first statewide run for months, though he has yet to establish a campaign or fundraising apparatus.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2002
Democrat James T. Smith Jr. won the race for Baltimore County executive yesterday, defeating Republican Douglas B. Riley with a careful campaign preaching sound management and fiscal responsibility. With all precincts reporting, Smith was the unofficial winner with a lead of more than 30,000 votes. In other county executive races in the Baltimore region, Republican incumbent James M. Harkins scored an easy victory over Democratic challenger Paul Gilbert in the race for Harford executive; Anne Arundel incumbent Janet S. Owens, a Democrat, defeated Republican challenger Phillip D. Bissett; and in Howard, incumbent Democrat James N. Robey won re-election easily in a race against Republican Steven H. Adler.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is a Marylander right down to his board shorts. Born in Lochearn, he attend Gilman School, the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Baltimore School of Law. Elected county executive in 2010, he also served for 16 years as a county councilman. So it's no surprise that when asked about his favorite vacation destination, he named the state's summertime staple, Ocean City . He and his wife, Jill, "love to go to beaches," Kamenetz said.
NEWS
February 21, 2012
If Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan to shift some teacher pension costs to the counties is approved by the legislature, no jurisdiction will take so large a hit in the first year as Baltimore County. Poorer jurisdictions are due to get an influx of direct state aid under the governor's proposal, and richer ones benefit more from Mr. O'Malley's idea to limit income tax exemptions and deductions for the top fifth of earners. The result is that Baltimore County would see a hit of nearly $3 million in the fiscal year that begins in July, with the effects magnified in the years after that.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.