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By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2001
Calling a proposed rental property registry bill unconstitutional and discriminatory, landlords and renters lobbied the Baltimore County Council yesterday to reject the measure. Supporters also crowded the council's work session yesterday, arguing that the bill would provide the county with important tools to prevent the decline of neighborhoods by allowing inspections every two years during license renewals and requiring landlords to designate a local agent. Rental registration has been a top priority for community activists for years.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | April 16, 1991
When Beth Hannon tried to fight plans to build a housing development in a field near her Glyndon home, she felt her concerns expressed to county officials fell on deaf ears."
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | October 7, 2008
By the time the Baltimore County Council wrapped up last night, T. Bryan McIntire, the panel's elder statesman, was reminded all too clearly what it's like to have a cause no one else believes in. McIntire had suggested putting the brakes on the scrolling billboards on the sides of trucks that often hawk strip clubs and other facile entertainments. But not one of McIntire's six colleagues on the council so much as seconded his proposal. After an awkward silence, McIntire said he would withdraw his bill, but he then began to make a case for it again.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | May 29, 1992
The Baltimore County Council yesterday approved a $1.15 billion budget for next year that includes an increase in the piggyback income tax rate, to 55 percent from 50 percent, but no change in the property tax rate.As part of a deal with County Executive Roger B. Hayden, the council also cut $7.2 million from the executive's proposed budget. And Mr. Hayden agreed to reallocate the money to hire (( 40 new police recruits, restore cuts in the Fire Department's emergency medical services program and buy $1 million worth of computers for schools.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2003
After a week of intense negotiations, the Baltimore County Council unanimously approved granting binding arbitration for police and firefighters last night, but the final version of the bill omits or modifies provisions the labor organizations had identified as key to a meaningful system for negotiations. Leaders of the county's branches of the Fraternal Order of Police and International Association of Fire Fighters said, however, they are pleased that after years of efforts, they succeeded in gaining the right to have an arbitrator determine fair compensation and terms of employment for public safety workers.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | December 19, 1993
While supporters of assisted living homes for the elderly marshal their forces, the Baltimore County Council has postponed a scheduled vote Monday night on a bill that would ease restrictions on the facilities.The measure's sponsor, William A. Howard 4th, R-6th, said he asked for two-week delay so he could mount a campaign to "educate" his six colleagues about the regulation of such homes. Mr. Howard wants to pass the measure intact at the council's Jan. 3 session."It's a good bill the way it is," he said.
NEWS
October 26, 1998
FOR THE past four years, the Baltimore County Council has worked well. Instead of parochial bickering, the council's seven members have tended to agree on a broad vision for the future of the Baltimore area's largest local government. We hope this constructive approach continues.That's why The Sun supports the re-election of Steven G. Samuel Moxley, a Democrat who has represented the populous Arbutus, Catonsville and Westview areas since 1994, when he defeated Berchie Manley for the council seat.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2005
The Baltimore County Council yesterday adopted a $1.45 billion budget and approved raises for police officers, firefighters, teachers - and for members of the council. The council unanimously adopted County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s proposed budget largely unchanged, approving a spending plan that does not alter the county's property or income tax rates. But two council members, chairman Joseph Bartenfelder and John Olszewski Sr., voted against raising the salaries of county employees because, they said later, they oppose increasing council members' salaries from $45,000 to $54,000 a year.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1999
Baltimore County Council enacted a measure last night that officials hope will clear the way to convert the former Catonsville Middle School into a $6.3 million recreation center, eliminating the right to appeal changes proposed for county-owned historic properties to the Board of Appeals.The County Council passed an ordinance, 4 to 3, that supporters say ensures a community center for Catonsville and clarifies county codes regarding appeals of projects on historic county properties."It's just clarifying what's already in the law," said Councilman Stephen G. Sam Moxley, a Catonsville Democrat who has been involved in the project for years.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2003
The Baltimore County Council held its first public confirmation hearings for county department heads yesterday, but in contrast to the sometimes heated rhetoric that has accompanied Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s personnel moves so far, the discussions were cordial and focused on policy issues. The council interviewed Smith's appointees to head five departments - Arnold J. Eppel, acting director of the Department of Aging; David A.C. Carroll, director of the Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Management; Fire Chief John J. Hohman; Health Officer Michelle Leverett and acting Recreation and Parks Director Robert J. Barrett.
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