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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | May 29, 1992
The Baltimore County Council yesterday approved a $1.15 billion budget for next year that includes an increase in the piggyback income tax rate, to 55 percent from 50 percent, but no change in the property tax rate.As part of a deal with County Executive Roger B. Hayden, the council also cut $7.2 million from the executive's proposed budget. And Mr. Hayden agreed to reallocate the money to hire (( 40 new police recruits, restore cuts in the Fire Department's emergency medical services program and buy $1 million worth of computers for schools.
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NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2003
After a week of intense negotiations, the Baltimore County Council unanimously approved granting binding arbitration for police and firefighters last night, but the final version of the bill omits or modifies provisions the labor organizations had identified as key to a meaningful system for negotiations. Leaders of the county's branches of the Fraternal Order of Police and International Association of Fire Fighters said, however, they are pleased that after years of efforts, they succeeded in gaining the right to have an arbitrator determine fair compensation and terms of employment for public safety workers.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | December 19, 1993
While supporters of assisted living homes for the elderly marshal their forces, the Baltimore County Council has postponed a scheduled vote Monday night on a bill that would ease restrictions on the facilities.The measure's sponsor, William A. Howard 4th, R-6th, said he asked for two-week delay so he could mount a campaign to "educate" his six colleagues about the regulation of such homes. Mr. Howard wants to pass the measure intact at the council's Jan. 3 session."It's a good bill the way it is," he said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Open retail strife has broken out in White Marsh as the owners of the area's mall and other established retail centers foment opposition to a proposed upscale outlet mall along Interstate 95. Paragon Outlet Partners proposed building a 525,000-square-foot center with about 100 outlet stores, including brands such as Calvin Klein, Coach and Kate Spade, that would draw customers from across the region and off I-95. The Baltimore-based firm specializes in such malls, developing centers closer to population centers than outlets historically have located.
NEWS
October 26, 1998
FOR THE past four years, the Baltimore County Council has worked well. Instead of parochial bickering, the council's seven members have tended to agree on a broad vision for the future of the Baltimore area's largest local government. We hope this constructive approach continues.That's why The Sun supports the re-election of Steven G. Samuel Moxley, a Democrat who has represented the populous Arbutus, Catonsville and Westview areas since 1994, when he defeated Berchie Manley for the council seat.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1999
Baltimore County Council enacted a measure last night that officials hope will clear the way to convert the former Catonsville Middle School into a $6.3 million recreation center, eliminating the right to appeal changes proposed for county-owned historic properties to the Board of Appeals.The County Council passed an ordinance, 4 to 3, that supporters say ensures a community center for Catonsville and clarifies county codes regarding appeals of projects on historic county properties."It's just clarifying what's already in the law," said Councilman Stephen G. Sam Moxley, a Catonsville Democrat who has been involved in the project for years.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2005
The Baltimore County Council yesterday adopted a $1.45 billion budget and approved raises for police officers, firefighters, teachers - and for members of the council. The council unanimously adopted County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s proposed budget largely unchanged, approving a spending plan that does not alter the county's property or income tax rates. But two council members, chairman Joseph Bartenfelder and John Olszewski Sr., voted against raising the salaries of county employees because, they said later, they oppose increasing council members' salaries from $45,000 to $54,000 a year.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2003
The Baltimore County Council held its first public confirmation hearings for county department heads yesterday, but in contrast to the sometimes heated rhetoric that has accompanied Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s personnel moves so far, the discussions were cordial and focused on policy issues. The council interviewed Smith's appointees to head five departments - Arnold J. Eppel, acting director of the Department of Aging; David A.C. Carroll, director of the Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Management; Fire Chief John J. Hohman; Health Officer Michelle Leverett and acting Recreation and Parks Director Robert J. Barrett.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2006
Penny McCrimmon wants to bring a woman's point of view to what has for years been an all-male assemblage. She is running for the Baltimore County Council. "It's become an old boys' club," said McCrimmon, a Randallstown community activist who says she often hears from women who voted for her when she came up short in her council bid four years ago. "They told me that they wanted women on the council because nobody's representing their voice, nobody's hearing their issues." Across the nation, more women hold public office than did 15 years ago. More women are running for office this year than in any recent election, according to one recent study, and a woman is considered a leading contender for president in 2008.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1999
The Baltimore County Council is expected to award a 10-year, $82 million health care contract tonight without formally checking whether other companies could do the work better or cheaper.On advice from a consultant, the County Council likely will approve a pact with CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield to administer medical claims and provide other services for most of Baltimore County's 22,400 teachers, police officers, public works employees and other workers.The county is bypassing the competitive bidding process designed to ensure that taxpayers get the best deal.
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