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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | May 23, 1999
Mission: The association was founded last year to work in partnership with the city of Baltimore to ensure the future of the historic Baltimore Conservatory in Druid Hill Park, the third oldest designed park in the United States; to assist in the development of the conservatory into a premier horticultural center; to continue educational, recreational, career training, employment, economic development and tourism programs. The conservatory complex is owned by the city and includes the 1888 Palm House with glass walls that enclose tropical plants and trees, and three adjacent greenhouses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER | October 29, 2009
Pity the poor mum. Once the symbol of Chinese royal houses, it has been reduced to a spot in the parking lot of big box stores. There is a place where chrysanthemums get the respect they deserve - the Baltimore Conservatory in Druid Hill Park where, until Nov. 15, mums will be the center of attention. All kinds of mums, from the giant football mums to the delicate spider mums to the humble garden mums. "Mums don't have the same status in the garden," agreed Kathryn Blom, who supervises the Howard Peters Rawlings Conservatory and the Botanic Gardens.
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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2004
The people who run one of Baltimore's biggest glass houses did not throw stones yesterday - they threw a party. Reviving a tradition, the recently renovated Baltimore Conservatory and Botanic Gardens held its first holiday open house in three years, with a thousand poinsettias creating an especially festive look. The 1888 Victorian glass palace in Druid Hill Park, a civic architectural gem that had fallen on hard times, reopened this fall after an extended upgrade and expansion. Elizabeth Hopkins, the board president of the association that helps run the conservatory for the city's Department of Recreation and Parks, said reviving the open house was the beginning of an effort to reintroduce the glass house to new generations of city dwellers.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
Rich reds, vivid yellows, pretty pinks: These are just a few of the colors you'll see at the Spring Flower Display at the Baltimore Conservatory and Botanic Gardens. The conservatory, once known as "the jewel of Druid Hill Park," reopened last fall after a major renovation. Now open year round, it has permanent exhibitions of palms, some of which are shown here, orchids and tropical, Mediterranean and desert plants. The spring display, with hundreds of fragrant daffodils, tulips, lilies and hyacinths, is one of several shows planned for 2005.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2001
Baltimoreans took advantage of yesterday's clear skies and near-70s temperature in the usual ways: yard work, pickup basketball games and afternoon jogs. There also was an activity perfect for the season as about 200 area children spent part of their day scrambling for Easter eggs at the Baltimore Conservatory in Druid Hill Park. The fourth annual Spring Open House and Easter Egg Hunt - sponsored by the Horticultural Division of the city Department of Recreation and Parks and the Baltimore Conservatory Association - was a big hit for youngsters.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2001
As March blusters outside the greenhouse, four children huddle over tiny cuttings of Cuban oregano. They pour water into an ashy-colored growing medium, poke at it with fingers and pens, giggle. Directing their efforts is a tiny woman with hair the color of dark rich potting soil and a face furrowed in concentration. Kate Blom is the greenhouse supervisor here at the Baltimore Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Druid Hill Park. This time of year she's mostly waking things up, getting tulips and other spring bulbs ready for the annual spring show.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2004
The long-languishing and often-overlooked Baltimore Conservatory and Botanic Gardens in Druid Hill Park is blossoming again after a major overhaul that took four years and cost $5 million. The imposing Victorian glass palace, closed for repairs since 2000, received truckloads of tropical plants, flowers and palm trees this week to fill its four main display rooms. Renovations of the soaring five-story space, which contains 1.5 acres of indoor gardens surrounded by walls of glass windows, was funded with money from a city bond issue and the state's Program Open Space.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
Rich reds, vivid yellows, pretty pinks: These are just a few of the colors you'll see at the Spring Flower Display at the Baltimore Conservatory and Botanic Gardens. The conservatory, once known as "the jewel of Druid Hill Park," reopened last fall after a major renovation. Now open year round, it has permanent exhibitions of palms, some of which are shown here, orchids and tropical, Mediterranean and desert plants. The spring display, with hundreds of fragrant daffodils, tulips, lilies and hyacinths, is one of several shows planned for 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | August 19, 1999
Garden tourStroll through the garden at the Baltimore Conservatory on Sunday during its "Afternoon in the Garden." Enjoy guided tours, garden lectures, refreshments and more. Avid and novice gardeners can learn gardening tips, and non-gardeners can savor the sights and scents of the lavish garden. The event is sponsored by the Baltimore Conservatory and the Conservatory Association.The event runs from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at the Baltimore Conservatory, Druid Hill Park, McCulloh Street and Gwynns Falls Parkway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur | March 17, 2005
`The Three Bears' Get seats that are just right at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's performance of The Three Bears Saturday. In addition to being set to music, the children's tale about a little girl's journey into the forest is narrated and features dancing by the Baltimore School for the Arts Dancers. The concert is geared toward children ages 3-6 and their families. "The Three Bears" will be performed Saturday at 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m., at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Admission is $12-$15.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur | March 17, 2005
`The Three Bears' Get seats that are just right at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's performance of The Three Bears Saturday. In addition to being set to music, the children's tale about a little girl's journey into the forest is narrated and features dancing by the Baltimore School for the Arts Dancers. The concert is geared toward children ages 3-6 and their families. "The Three Bears" will be performed Saturday at 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m., at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Admission is $12-$15.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2004
The people who run one of Baltimore's biggest glass houses did not throw stones yesterday - they threw a party. Reviving a tradition, the recently renovated Baltimore Conservatory and Botanic Gardens held its first holiday open house in three years, with a thousand poinsettias creating an especially festive look. The 1888 Victorian glass palace in Druid Hill Park, a civic architectural gem that had fallen on hard times, reopened this fall after an extended upgrade and expansion. Elizabeth Hopkins, the board president of the association that helps run the conservatory for the city's Department of Recreation and Parks, said reviving the open house was the beginning of an effort to reintroduce the glass house to new generations of city dwellers.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2004
It started with a camellia plant, a gift from "the Orient" that needed a home during Baltimore's frigid winters. Then history and fads kicked in, prompting city officials to build in 1888 a glass conservatory that became a staple of Druid Hill outings in the early 20th century, before the conservatory was left to languish. Now, once again, the Baltimore Conservatory and Botanic Gardens has urban trends on its side. The soaring glass-and-iron structure reopens today with new greenhouses, plants and additions a decade after community members and city officials started fighting its decay.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2004
The long-languishing and often-overlooked Baltimore Conservatory and Botanic Gardens in Druid Hill Park is blossoming again after a major overhaul that took four years and cost $5 million. The imposing Victorian glass palace, closed for repairs since 2000, received truckloads of tropical plants, flowers and palm trees this week to fill its four main display rooms. Renovations of the soaring five-story space, which contains 1.5 acres of indoor gardens surrounded by walls of glass windows, was funded with money from a city bond issue and the state's Program Open Space.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2001
Baltimoreans took advantage of yesterday's clear skies and near-70s temperature in the usual ways: yard work, pickup basketball games and afternoon jogs. There also was an activity perfect for the season as about 200 area children spent part of their day scrambling for Easter eggs at the Baltimore Conservatory in Druid Hill Park. The fourth annual Spring Open House and Easter Egg Hunt - sponsored by the Horticultural Division of the city Department of Recreation and Parks and the Baltimore Conservatory Association - was a big hit for youngsters.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2001
As March blusters outside the greenhouse, four children huddle over tiny cuttings of Cuban oregano. They pour water into an ashy-colored growing medium, poke at it with fingers and pens, giggle. Directing their efforts is a tiny woman with hair the color of dark rich potting soil and a face furrowed in concentration. Kate Blom is the greenhouse supervisor here at the Baltimore Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Druid Hill Park. This time of year she's mostly waking things up, getting tulips and other spring bulbs ready for the annual spring show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | November 26, 1998
The Santa Express'It's official: The holidays are coming. Santa's begun making his rounds at area malls and attractions. He's making that list and checking it twice. Tomorrow, he makes his first stop at the B&O Railroad Museum, as part of its "Holiday Train Tracks and the Santa Express." Kids can bring their Christmas list to him every Saturday and Sunday through December. He'll be perched in the red caboose in the Roundhouse, available for pictures and visits. The Santa Express train runs every weekend through December.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | March 25, 1999
Easter egg hunt Bring your basket and your best searching skills for an Easter egg hunt and open house at the Baltimore Conservatory in Druid Hill Park Sunday. Open to children ages 10 and under, the hunt and open house take place all afternoon and include children's entertainment, a visit with the Easter bunny, face painting, music by the Charm City Band and seasonal plants and Easter lilies for sale. The egg hunt begins at 2:30 p.m. for children ages 5 and under and at 3 p.m. for children ages 6 to 10. Prizes and candy will be awarded to participants who find specially numbered eggs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gina Kazimir and Gina Kazimir,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2001
There is no chance of confusing the seasons this year. Winter has made its presence known, with some very long stretches of cold weather. Heating bills look more like holiday credit-card statements, and it's so cold outside no one wants to step out the door. You've been locked in your house for so long you're bored out of your skull and want something exciting to do. But something indoors, please. You know you can always go to the library or your local bookstore, and your favorite coffeehouse is a reliable retreat.
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