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By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Art Donovan played pro football for 12 years. The rest of his life, he spent telling everyone about it. Donovan, 89, who died Sunday of a respiratory ailment at Stella Maris Hospice, played and talked a great game. He was a Hall of Fame defensive tackle for the Baltimore Colts and an engaging raconteur at banquets and on TV talk shows. His cherublike face, adenoidal voice and side-splitting tales of yore captivated generations of viewers who never saw Donovan collar a quarterback or take down a runner.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 5, 2013
The first time I met Artie Donovan, I got all of it - a big serving of his affable nature, his way of taking genuine interest in a complete stranger, a dose of his amazing memory and his way of connecting life experiences with the food and drink that accompanied them. This was 25 years ago. I was supposed to interview Hall of Famer Donovan, but he started off with questions for me instead. He recognized my New England accent. "Where are you from?" he asked. When I told him my native state was Massachusetts, he wanted to know what town.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | August 4, 2013
There was a message left on the office phone one cold night in 2001, but the caller didn't leave his name. It was just an old raspy voice wanting to say hi. I recognized the voice because I had heard him talk several hundred times, so I called him back to give him my regards. It was Art Donovan. Before I finished my introduction, he cut me off and started another conversation. "I know who you are, kid," said the Baltimore Colts' former Pro Bowl defensive tackle. "I read your stuff.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
Ravens fan Robert Radawiec moved to Cleveland a decade ago, but he had never made the 45-minute drive to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. That changed this weekend not only for him, but for so many other Ravens fans who descended on this northeastern Ohio city to welcome in one of their own. Left tackle Jonathan Ogden became the first player the Ravens drafted to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. "I've never had a reason to go," said Radawiec, who wore purple camouflaged pants and a Ravens polo shirt.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 24, 2013
The Harford Community College ASID Interior Design Student Chapter designed a nursery in the 37th Annual Baltimore Symphony Decorators' Show House that was open to the public for three weeks in May. This year's Show House, a five-bedroom stucco Colonial built in 1932, was once home to Baltimore Colts' quarterback Johnny Unitas, his wife, Sandy, and their young family, and it is where they lived from 1971 to 1988. Caprice Brody, Roxana Carrera, Priscilla Tabeling, Alexa Hubicki and Sarah Garcia were the students who worked on the project.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
The kick knifed through the thick fog and split the uprights at Memorial Stadium, giving the Colts a 10-7 victory in sudden-death overtime. In a flash, fans swarmed the field. Down came the goal posts. Up went Toni Linhart, on someone's shoulders. Linhart's 31-yard field goal defeated the rival Miami Dolphins late in 1975 and all but clinched Baltimore's first of three straight AFC East titles. It was the kick of a lifetime for Linhart, who died Sunday morning of cancer, at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium . He was 70. One of only six Austrian-born NFL players, Anton Hans Jorg Linhart signed with the Colts in 1974 after one season with the New Orleans Saints and an 11-year soccer career in Europe.
NEWS
dsturm@tribune.com | April 24, 2013
Not only is Patsy Cline's 1962 hit "Crazy" among the choices on the little jukeboxes perched on the wall at the Bel-Loc Diner's booths, the country singer with the smooth, sultry voice once ate there. So have singer Brenda Lee and comedian Redd Foxx. The Baltimore Colts legendary quarterback Johnny Unitas was known to drop in as well, and Orioles "Iron Man" Cal Ripken Jr. once graciously signed autographs during a meal. "He (Ripken) tipped pretty well," waitress Rachel Fisher recalled.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
Arthur W. Machen Jr., a retired attorney who was also the chancellor of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland and a legal advocate for the poor, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The former Ruxton resident was 92. A well-respected corporate lawyer, he helped 1950s Baltimore Colts players Gino Marchetti and Alan Ameche incorporate their food businesses, and he often espoused liberal causes. "His range was enormous," said a legal colleague, Alan Yarbro of Ruxton.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
  Every Monday, Baltimore Sun blogger and reporter Matt Vensel will rank the most significant athletes and events in Baltimore sports that week based on accomplishments on and off the field. Because, well, why not? The return of the Orioles was the big story this week, overshadowing the release of Ravens linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo, Maryland's loss in the NIT semifinals and a rift amongst the sons of a local legend. The Orioles went 3-3 in their first six games of 2013, but it was a fun first week thanks to one Orioles slugger.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
Gregory J. Alexander and Paul Kelsey Williams have combed through photo archives, and the result of their labors is "Lost Baltimore," which is a painful reminder of notable buildings that fell victim, for the most part, to fire or urban renewal. They also expand the "lost" concept to include sports teams, businesses, entertainment venues and even the weekly chore of scrubbing marble steps that has largely vanished. Alexander and Williams have included a cross-section of commercial structures as well as the once-grand estates of Guilford, Ulman, Bolton and the Wyman Villa, which were demolished to make way for new neighborhoods.
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