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By KARL MERTON FERRON and KARL MERTON FERRON,SUN REPORTER | May 21, 2006
What can a landlubber say about riding with a seasoned crew of the Pride of Baltimore II? My head still swims with the nautical terminology that I couldn't quite grasp. I boarded in Solomons for the two-day trip up Chesapeake Bay to the Pride's home port. It was intimidating, as I gingerly went below deck for the first time, wondering how many people busted their behinds after slipping on the almost-vertical stairs. Fortunately, I have not one mishap to report. Not that such thoughts didn't cross my mind.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
No, Dear Reader, you are not caught in a time warp or a victim of a delayed April Fool's prank. You are not in "The Twilight Zone" and your eyes are not deceiving you. What you're looking at is The Baltimore Sun's vignette, or nameplate, as it appeared on May 17, 1837, when the newspaper first came off founder Arunah Shepherdson Abell's R. Hoe & Co. Press in his 21 Light St. office. We are republishing this venerable nameplate today in honor of the 173rd birthday of Vol. 1, No. 1 of The Sun. When the first Sun was published, Martin Van Buren was president (he was the eighth)
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
The best thing on TV tonight: A 40-year-old sitcom repeat with Harpo Marx and Lucille Ball. If you've never seen it, do. If you've seen it before, enjoy it again."
NEWS
By KARL MERTON FERRON and KARL MERTON FERRON,SUN REPORTER | May 21, 2006
What can a landlubber say about riding with a seasoned crew of the Pride of Baltimore II? My head still swims with the nautical terminology that I couldn't quite grasp. I boarded in Solomons for the two-day trip up Chesapeake Bay to the Pride's home port. It was intimidating, as I gingerly went below deck for the first time, wondering how many people busted their behinds after slipping on the almost-vertical stairs. Fortunately, I have not one mishap to report. Not that such thoughts didn't cross my mind.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1995
Planners envisioned the Pride of Baltimore as a museum re-creation that would float placidly at an Inner Harbor dock. Instead, the two ships that have born the name Pride of Baltimore have sailed the globe, as shown in a nice documentary tonight.* "The Pride: Legacy of the Baltimore Clipper" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Station news anchors Donna Hamilton and Virg Jacques present a captivating film, released last year as a membership premium of the Pride of Baltimore Foundation. It charts the history of Baltimore's goodwill ambassadors, including some pretty vivid survivor accounts of the 1986 sinking of the first Pride of Baltimore off Bermuda, in which four crew members lost their lives.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | September 27, 1992
Use the term "traditional vessel" up here at the mouth of the Susquehanna, and waterfront old-timers would probably think you meant a duck-hunter's sinkbox, banned since 1934, or maybe a shoal-draft wooden skiff like the ones Earl Ashenfelter used for so many years to fish the rocky shallows below Conowingo.But there's an appreciation for larger craft too. The fast-growing Havre de Grace Maritime Museum has its own old skipjack, safely berthed on dry land. And when such visitors as the elegant Lady Maryland or the cumbersome replica the Maryland Dove are in town, they draw their share of salty visitors along with the tourists.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- A sliver of moon rode low in a sky streaked with magenta and orange as the crew of Pride of Baltimore II prepared to weigh anchor in St. Michaels harbor yesterday for the penultimate leg of their journey home.You see spectacular sunrises and sunsets all over the world, said ship's engineer Andrew Kauffmann, who was up before most of the rest of the crew, but none so pretty as those on Chesapeake Bay, the ones that tell you that you're home.After 13 months at sea, traveling the Americas and dodging two hurricanes, Pride II -- a replica of a 19th-century Baltimore Clipper -- has returned to safe harbor.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- After 13 months at sea, traveling the Americas and dodging two hurricanes, Pride of Baltimore II -- a replica of a 19th-century Baltimore Clipper -- was due to arrive at the Inner Harbor today with all guns booming.Patrick McGeady, whose older brother, Joseph, survived the sinking of the original Pride in a freak storm in 1986, has packed 60 charges for a four-cannon celebration. "We're going to be blowing cannons all the way up to the harbor," he said. "This is the moment I've been waiting for. Coming in."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
No, Dear Reader, you are not caught in a time warp or a victim of a delayed April Fool's prank. You are not in "The Twilight Zone" and your eyes are not deceiving you. What you're looking at is The Baltimore Sun's vignette, or nameplate, as it appeared on May 17, 1837, when the newspaper first came off founder Arunah Shepherdson Abell's R. Hoe & Co. Press in his 21 Light St. office. We are republishing this venerable nameplate today in honor of the 173rd birthday of Vol. 1, No. 1 of The Sun. When the first Sun was published, Martin Van Buren was president (he was the eighth)
FEATURES
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 2002
It's only fitting that William Donald Schaefer will be honored tonight at a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Pride of Baltimore. While many people can take some credit for the idea, then-Mayor Schaefer made the Pride a reality. Indeed, the notion of a Pride of Baltimore was utterly Schaeferesque: unconventional yet historically evocative; inspired but not particularly well-conceived. It was around the time of the nation's bicentennial, and Baltimore had fallen into decline. New development was under way downtown, but the city needed some panache.
FEATURES
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 2002
It's only fitting that William Donald Schaefer will be honored tonight at a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Pride of Baltimore. While many people can take some credit for the idea, then-Mayor Schaefer made the Pride a reality. Indeed, the notion of a Pride of Baltimore was utterly Schaeferesque: unconventional yet historically evocative; inspired but not particularly well-conceived. It was around the time of the nation's bicentennial, and Baltimore had fallen into decline. New development was under way downtown, but the city needed some panache.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
Capt. Bob Glover stood on the dock at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut at nightfall on a cold March day and watched as director Steven Spielberg filmed Africans disembarking from the slave ship Amistad."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
The best thing on TV tonight: A 40-year-old sitcom repeat with Harpo Marx and Lucille Ball. If you've never seen it, do. If you've seen it before, enjoy it again."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1995
Planners envisioned the Pride of Baltimore as a museum re-creation that would float placidly at an Inner Harbor dock. Instead, the two ships that have born the name Pride of Baltimore have sailed the globe, as shown in a nice documentary tonight.* "The Pride: Legacy of the Baltimore Clipper" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Station news anchors Donna Hamilton and Virg Jacques present a captivating film, released last year as a membership premium of the Pride of Baltimore Foundation. It charts the history of Baltimore's goodwill ambassadors, including some pretty vivid survivor accounts of the 1986 sinking of the first Pride of Baltimore off Bermuda, in which four crew members lost their lives.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- A sliver of moon rode low in a sky streaked with magenta and orange as the crew of Pride of Baltimore II prepared to weigh anchor in St. Michaels harbor yesterday for the penultimate leg of their journey home.You see spectacular sunrises and sunsets all over the world, said ship's engineer Andrew Kauffmann, who was up before most of the rest of the crew, but none so pretty as those on Chesapeake Bay, the ones that tell you that you're home.After 13 months at sea, traveling the Americas and dodging two hurricanes, Pride II -- a replica of a 19th-century Baltimore Clipper -- has returned to safe harbor.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- After 13 months at sea, traveling the Americas and dodging two hurricanes, Pride of Baltimore II -- a replica of a 19th-century Baltimore Clipper -- was due to arrive at the Inner Harbor today with all guns booming.Patrick McGeady, whose older brother, Joseph, survived the sinking of the original Pride in a freak storm in 1986, has packed 60 charges for a four-cannon celebration. "We're going to be blowing cannons all the way up to the harbor," he said. "This is the moment I've been waiting for. Coming in."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
Capt. Bob Glover stood on the dock at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut at nightfall on a cold March day and watched as director Steven Spielberg filmed Africans disembarking from the slave ship Amistad."
NEWS
August 24, 2004
HAZEL BEATRICE (ROBB) CIZEK, 102, of Baltimore, MD, wife of the late Frank L. Cizek; died Saturday, August 21, 2004 at the Governor's House in Simsbury, CT. She was born June 24, 1902 in Baltimore; daughter of the late James H. and Ida K. (Ecoff) Robb and had lived in Baltimore most of her life prior to moving to Connecticut. She was a past member o f the Maryland Historical Society and was the great-granddaughter of James A. Robb, who was the Baltimore Clipper Ship builder in the 1800's.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | September 27, 1992
Use the term "traditional vessel" up here at the mouth of the Susquehanna, and waterfront old-timers would probably think you meant a duck-hunter's sinkbox, banned since 1934, or maybe a shoal-draft wooden skiff like the ones Earl Ashenfelter used for so many years to fish the rocky shallows below Conowingo.But there's an appreciation for larger craft too. The fast-growing Havre de Grace Maritime Museum has its own old skipjack, safely berthed on dry land. And when such visitors as the elegant Lady Maryland or the cumbersome replica the Maryland Dove are in town, they draw their share of salty visitors along with the tourists.
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