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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Baltimore may have abandoned its "City that Reads" slogan too soon. Federal consumer spending data released this week by the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that Baltimore-area residents spent an average of $154 annually on books, newspapers, magazines and other pleasure reading - about 45 percent more than the $106 national average. That's just a tiny fraction of area expenditures, but it's consistent with the profile of the wealthy, middle-aged average consumer revealed in the BLS data.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
A crash on northbound Interstate 95 has shut down lanes just past the Baltimore Beltway in Arbutus. The one-car crash at 8:30 a.m. caused the closure of two lanes and one shoulder. The two right-hand lanes of traffic are getting by, according to the Maryland State Highway Administration. Emergency roadwork has closed one lane and one shoulder on eastbound Route 7 at Rossville Boulevard in Baltimore County. One eastbound lane is getting through. Lanes have reopened on southbound Interstate 83 at Timonium Road, where there was a seven-car crash earlier.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
How's "Baltimore - Birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner" sound for a new city slogan? City Councilman James B. Kraft is expected to introduce legislation at Monday's meeting to set a new official slogan to "celebrate Baltimore's essential link to our national anthem. " Kraft, who represents Southeast Baltimore, is asking for immediate adoption of a resolution to set the new slogan. He's also expected to file a companion bill. It's too soon to tell if the slogan will have more staying more power than the city's last: "Baltimore: A Great Place to Grow," which was unveiled by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in 2011.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A Baltimore non-profit organization that works to reduce infant mortality in the city lost its federal funding and may shut its doors, the group said Monday. Baltimore Healthy Start Inc. reported the nearly $2.5 million was most of the annual budget, used for programs in Rosemont, Edmondson Village, Sandtown/Winchester, Middle East and Highlandtown. The largely African American communities have higher infant mortality rates. For the first time this year grants were awarded as part of a competitive process that considered evidence-based approaches to improving women's health and access to care and improving and tracking the quality of services provided, among other areas, Health Resources and Services Administration spokesman Martin Kramer said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
This week, the Washington Post is running a series on how police work to seize cash during car stops without a warrant or making an arrest -- and data compiled by the paper suggests Baltimore City and Baltimore County police are among the biggest financial beneficiaries of the controversial tactic. Under a federal program, police departments can get payouts when they seize cash. And since 2001 the two Maryland departments each received $7 million taken from motorists and others, according to the Post's analysis.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
The sky isn't quite falling yet, but gambling casinos are folding like battered beach chairs in Atlantic City ( "Baltimore's casino reality," Aug. 26) It seems any lingering mention of Atlantic City evolving into an East Coast version of Las Vegas has been carried away in the Atlantic Ocean surf. I can remember 30 years ago when everyone spoke of the new gambling mecca in Atlantic City as the shining star of the Mid-Atlantic region. My, how the supposedly mighty have fallen.
NEWS
By Jonathon Rondeau | September 4, 2014
Throughout the Baltimore City school year, student success will be measured in the traditional ways, through test scores and grades, and, for high school seniors, by whether or not they graduate. While tracking such standards is vital to understanding student achievement and progress as well as the success of our school system as a whole, another key indicator deserves far more focused attention: attendance. For students to succeed in school, they have to be in school. And not enough of Baltimore City students are attending school as much as they should.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Frank J. Russell, the former owner of a carpet company who was a longtime Salvation Army volunteer and an accomplished portrait artist, died of pneumonia Aug. 28 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 79. "He was a very gifted artist, and there is nothing phony about him," said Mel Leipzig, a Trenton, N.J., artist and a longtime friend. "He was an extremely genuine person, and as an artist there is great sincerity in his work. " He was born Frank Joseph Russello in Brooklyn, N.Y., but later changed his name to Frank Joseph Russell, family members said.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
The former beverage manager at the Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is suing the hotel's operator for wrongful or abusive discharge, harassment, gender discrimination and for creating a hostile work environment.  In the suit, Tiffany Dawn Cianci claims she was harassed repeatedly by her superiors and ultimately terminated after refusing to sell alcohol that she believed was acquired outside of Maryland law. She also cites what the suit called “humiliating”...
NEWS
September 3, 2014
In his commentary, "The Civil Right Act at 50" (Aug. 31), Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori writes that "...our Catholic schools in Baltimore City educate majority non-Catholic, African-American students whose education is heavily subsidized by the Church's private partners seeking to improve lives (and communities) through education. " It seems to me a bit hypocritical for Archbishop Lori to support these commitments when a few years ago, the archdiocese closed so many Catholic schools in Baltimore City where most of the students needed to have the influence of those schools to improve their lives.
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