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NEWS
March 31, 2012
I am very upset with what I read in your newspaper about the threat to the supplemental educational services tutoring program ("Fund classrooms, not corporations," March 27). I have a daughter who is in the free tutoring program, and no one asked me if this was a good or bad program. It has helped my daughter tremendously. Now interim state superintendent of schools Bernard J. Sadusky wants to take away the one program that Baltimore City children really need. I am outraged and appalled.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Audrey A. Cockrum, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
The Friends of Great Kids Farm will host their Second Annual Fall Food and Jazz Festival on Oct. 11. The event will serve locally sourced food, wine and beer accompanied by the music of the Dunbar High School Jazz Band. The festival will also feature a culinary competition among City Schools' rising chefs. Celebrity judges will award prizes for the best dish. “Each of the five high school culinary training programs will be preparing a signature dish - featuring produce from the Farm - in partnership with a local restaurant,” said Chrissa Carlson, Friends of Great Kids Farm executive director.
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NEWS
August 28, 2014
We read with interest Baltimore City schools CEO Gregory Thornton's commentary about the challenges ahead for the city's schools ( "Much work to be done," Aug. 25). As he indicates, one of the greatest barriers to student achievement is attendance, where there is still substantial work to do. Baltimore continues to suffer from rampant truancy and chronic absenteeism. What can we do to address this crisis? Since 2005, the University of Baltimore School of Law and its partners have worked with the schools to operate a Truancy Court Program, an early intervention, non-adversarial, non-punitive approach to truancy that aims to identify why children are not attending school and then attempts to resolve the underlying problems or causes.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
While Baltimore County officials were deciding whether Michael Williams was fit to continue teaching, he was assigned to a dusty, windowless room at a Pulaski Highway warehouse that held old textbooks, surplus computers and other materials. He, along with a dozen or so employees, sat at a long table reading detective novels and playing Trivial Pursuit. Sometimes they would fall asleep until supervisors, watching from a security camera, came in to wake them up. Williams, who had been accused of touching a girl on the cheek with a yardstick, was paid his full salary plus benefits for more than a year to show up at the warehouse when school was in session.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Barbra Katz Rosenberg from Baltimore, a frequent contributor to this column, was seeking the recipe for the sticky buns that were served in the cafeterias at many Baltimore City schools back in the '60s. She said before her family moved to Baltimore County, her lunch would consist of one of the sticky buns, a hard pretzel and orange juice five days a week. "I didn't know about carbs way back then," she said. She would really like to be able to taste the sticky buns again. I received several responses from readers who offered recipes that they thought made reasonable copies of the popular school-system sticky bun from years back.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
For the last two weeks, I have done everything I could to get people to watch "The Learning," an illuminating documentary about the lives of four Filipina teachers who are recruited to teach in Baltimore City Schools. I have blogged, and here's a link to that. I have gone on WYPR radio to talk about it, and here's a link to that. I am upset that Maryland Public Television is airing at 10:30 tonight (Sept. 25) on its digital channel 22.2 only. It debuted Tuesday night on public televisions  stations nationwide.
NEWS
By Will McKenna | March 3, 2004
AS THE FATHER of two girls under age 3, I find that sleep is hard to come by. The ongoing crisis in the Baltimore City school system, of which I am a part, has made a good night's rest still more difficult. Even in the best of times -- and the last several months have been far from that -- being a principal in the city is a difficult challenge. Yes, the work is rewarding and full of joy. But it is always bone-tiring work. I have for three years been the principal at Waverly Elementary/Middle School, which is across the street from where Memorial Stadium was. By any measure, Waverly has been a success.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
Without snowfall or ice on the roads, decisions by several Maryland school systems to cancel schools during a recent cold snap perplexed many. The polar vortex brought frigid arctic air into most of the country, and many schools in Baltimore and the region canceled or delayed classes — a measure aimed at keeping students warm and avoiding facility problems. Harford County Public Schools were among those closed Tuesday, when temperatures were in the single digits. The school system also had two-hour delays on Monday and Wednesday.
NEWS
August 19, 2003
An editorial on Monday should have said that 26 percent of students in Baltimore city schools were classified truant for the school year 2002-2003, not that that number were truant every day.
NEWS
February 19, 1997
Friday's editions reported incorrectly that Baltimore City schools would be open and that trash would be picked up President's Day, Feb. 17.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 2/19/97
NEWS
Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
When Baltimore city schools and the Maryland Stadium Authority adopted a plan to update the city's aging school buildings in January 2013, they hoped to rebuild or restore 30 to 35 schools in the first phase of renovations. But studies to identify the schools' needs determined that the $977 million in bond funding the system expects to receive would cover only 23 to 28 schools. The city school commissioners at their board meeting Tuesday night reviewed a hotly contested recommendation to defer renovations to some of Baltimore's most dilapidated schools because they would be the costliest to renovate.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
We read with interest Baltimore City schools CEO Gregory Thornton's commentary about the challenges ahead for the city's schools ( "Much work to be done," Aug. 25). As he indicates, one of the greatest barriers to student achievement is attendance, where there is still substantial work to do. Baltimore continues to suffer from rampant truancy and chronic absenteeism. What can we do to address this crisis? Since 2005, the University of Baltimore School of Law and its partners have worked with the schools to operate a Truancy Court Program, an early intervention, non-adversarial, non-punitive approach to truancy that aims to identify why children are not attending school and then attempts to resolve the underlying problems or causes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
Many thanks to reporter Liz Bowie for taking a close look at how Urban Teacher Center prepares new teachers to serve our local schools more effectively ( "Residency program tries to solve problem of teacher burnout," Aug. 18). As the new school year begins, we are proud to continue our partnership with Baltimore City Schools and to introduce a new class of Urban Teacher Center residents to the teaching profession. It is the teachers - those who have recently decided to dedicate their careers to helping students learn and grow and those who advance the profession every day by serving as excellent educators - who are making a difference in the lives of students in our city and across the nation.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
I read with great interest your article, "Residency program tries to solve problem of teacher burnout" (Aug. 18) about the Baltimore-based Urban Teacher Center developed by Jennifer Green, a former employee of the Baltimore City Schools. This initiative to procure highly talented, dual-certified future educators to serve our urban students is, like many teacher education pathways to certification in Maryland, a viable and successful endeavor. The Urban Teacher Center (UTC) reminds me of a similar program initiated under my supervision when I served as the human resource officer for the Baltimore City Public Schools.
NEWS
July 4, 2014
In response to the recent commentary about the challenges facing Baltimore's next schools CEO, "A perpetual hot seat" (June 30), too many young people are graduating from Baltimore City schools at a 3rd or 4th grade reading level. This is a crime and needs to be addressed immediately. I'm thankful that there is a focus on 3rd grade reading now, but we can't just throw away those young people who are older. Drastic intervention is needed. It's hard enough to get a job these days with only a high school diploma.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff Writer | September 16, 1993
Assaults with deadly weapons in Baltimore City schools dropped 16 percent last year, but reports of deadly weapons possession rose 46 percent over the 1991-1992 school year, school police reported yesterday.2 Unarmed ...... ...... ......... 28 ........ 27Sex offense ..... ...... .......... 9 ........ 13Sale/distribution of drugs ....... 16 ......... 8Theft or vandalism of propertyworth more than $300 ............. 72 ......... 82TOTAL ........... ...... ........ 340 ........ 401
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Those who qualify for free and reduced price lunch in Baltimore City schools - 84 percent of students -- have few options in the summer. But a federally-sponsored program will bring food to many of these kids beginning Tuesday, when Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Family League will announce goals that include an increase in meals to 1.5 million, up from 1.24 million last summer. As part of the program, Mobile Meals brings food twice a day to young children and teens in underserved areas of the city, and officials are seeking changes to the program to increase the meals to three a day. "There is no excuse for any child in our city to worry where their next meal will come from, and they should never, ever go to bed hungry," said Rawlings-Blake in a statement.
NEWS
May 25, 2014
When I read Patricia Schultheis' recent commentary on Baltimore School for the Arts ( "Who is responsible for Jabril?" May 19), I was saddened and frustrated. I was disappointed to hear that she, and the young man she spoke of, Jabril, had such a negative experience. I've taught U.S. History at BSA for the last three years, and I began the year after Jabril left. I can't speak on that particular incident, nor would it be appropriate for me to add to that conversation specifically.
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