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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
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NEWS
By Francois Furstenberg | September 9, 2014
On behalf of Baltimore's stakeholders, I want to express my thanks to Gregory E. Thornton, the new chief executive officer of Baltimore City Public Schools, for his inspiring words (" Much work to be done ," Aug. 25). In case you're wondering, the stake I hold is a house I recently bought in East Baltimore. It's a big row house, built in 1875, so I don't exactly hold it - really it holds me - but I guess that part isn't so important. Let me get to the point: CEO Thornton tells us he will run the city schools like a business.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
A Northwestern High School student was cut across his right thumb on Thursday after an altercation with another student outside the school. According to Baltimore City Public Schools, a male and female student were teasing each other off school grounds at the corner of Fallstaff Road and Park Heights Avenue. The teasing escalated, school system spokeswoman Edie House-Foster said, and the female cut the male student across his right thumb. Baltimore City Public Schools police took the girl to the state Juvenile Services department while the boy was taken to Sinai Hospital and treated for a superficial cut, House-Foster said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun staff | December 22, 2011
Officials from Baltimore City Public Schools are investigating a brawl that took place at a high school basketbal game Wednesday night in west Baltimore. According to reports, dozens of police officers were called to ConneXions School For The Arts on Wednesday night to respond to a fight during the school's game against Cardozo of Washington, D.C. Video of the incident shows both players and fans involved in the melee. Baltimore City Public Schools Police deferred comment to schools spokeswoman Edie House-Foster, who released the following statement: "Baltimore City Public Schools expects spectators and student athletes to exhibit excellent sportsmanship at all times.
NEWS
July 24, 2013
Urban blight in Baltimore is slowly oozing into more neighborhoods. Baltimore City Public Schools has made positive strides but have a long road to go in terms of improvement. Gang violence is on the uptick, and some neighborhoods are dying a slow urban death. Is it me or does it seem like Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake goes on a promotional bandstand this time each year for a needless open-wheel IndyCar race through the downtown streets? With a smattering of arrogance, the mayor is very intent on making this race work.
NEWS
By Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
A Gywnns Falls Elementary School staff member was assaulted as she entered the building early Tuesday, according to a Baltimore City public schools spokeswoman. The staff member was assaulted by an unknown assailant at 6 a.m. at the school's main entrance. The attacker left the scene, and the staff member was taken to the hospital. Spokeswoman Molly Rath said she could not release any information regarding the staff member's occupation, her injuries or what hospital she was transported to. No students or other staff members were present for the assault, Rath said, and parents were notified about the incident via a phone call and letter.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
A student at Baltimore Community High School is being charged after an altercation with his teacher, according to city schools. The incident occurred Wednesday morning in the hallway near the teacher's classroom at the school at 6820 Fait Ave. in Southeast Baltimore, according to a statement from city schools. The teacher, who was not identified, was treated at a nearby hospital. Baltimore City Public Schools police charged the student with aggravated assault, and he could receive an extended suspension or expulsion under the schools' code of conduct, the statement says.
NEWS
March 29, 2012
I am a parent of two children that have received the tutoring services provided by Baltimore City Public Schools. Both of my children have IEP learning plans from lead poisoning. These services have the helped my children and allowed my son to secure a position in the high school of his choice. I would hate for the funding to go to the school districts instead of the children of Baltimore City where the services are desperately needed ("Fund classrooms, not corporations," March 27). Please do not take away the supplemental educational services tutoring program.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
After a year away, the Basketball Academy returns to a college campus, Morgan State, for the 17 t h annual event that combines academics and service learning with three days of top-notch high school boys and girls basketball Thursday through Saturday. Last January, The Basketball Academy games had to be moved to Lake Clifton and the academic components to Mervo after a new NCAA rule banned basketball tournaments run by non-scholastic entities from Division I campuses. The rule aimed to prevent college programs from gaining a recruiting advantage by colluding with organizers to bring events such as AAU tournaments to their campuses.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
I read with great interest your article, "Residency program tries to solve problem of teacher burnout" (Aug. 18) about the Baltimore-based Urban Teacher Center developed by Jennifer Green, a former employee of the Baltimore City Schools. This initiative to procure highly talented, dual-certified future educators to serve our urban students is, like many teacher education pathways to certification in Maryland, a viable and successful endeavor. The Urban Teacher Center (UTC) reminds me of a similar program initiated under my supervision when I served as the human resource officer for the Baltimore City Public Schools.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Anyone looking through the fence as the season's first football practice was about to get underway Wednesday at Dunbar's East Baltimore field saw a bunch of guys in helmets and shorts and T-shirts tossing footballs, stretching or just talking. Everything appeared the same as any other year and that's exactly what Dunbar athletic director Dana Johnson wanted as preseason practice began for the Poets and all other fall sports team at Maryland public schools. Despite being without coach Lawrence Smith, who is appealing a one-year suspension for his handling of an alleged locker-room hazing incident last fall, the Poets are moving on with business as usual under interim coach Michael Carter, the Poets' defensive coordinator for the past few years.
SPORTS
By Ryan Bacic, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The event at the Under Armour campus in Baltimore played out like a fashion show and felt like a pep rally - replete with a standing-room-only crowd, bass-pumping music, thundersticks, Ravens cheerleaders and dance moves by mascot Poe. The end result, though, was all charity. With one athlete from each team acting as a model, Under Armour and the Ravens on Wednesday revealed the new uniforms they're donating to the varsity football and girls basketball programs of all 24 Baltimore public high schools.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 16, 2014
Baltimore City Council President Bernard "Jack" Young is requesting that school officials brief city leaders on the extent to which students are receiving a "complete education" in their schools. Young will introduce a resolution Monday that seeks information about offerings like arts and physical education. In a release, Young said a lack of arts and physical education, or what he calls an "incomplete curriculum," has been a disservice to city students. “A focus on basic education that leaves arts education and physical education aside ignores the competencies demanded by the complex, modern world in which Baltimore City Public Schools students are expected to thrive,” Young said in a statement.
NEWS
June 8, 2014
After reading the recent letter from Hamilton Elementary Middle School parents, it is clear there are severe misperceptions floating around about Baltimore City public charter schools ( "MarylandCAN isn't interested in kids but in pushing an anti-public school agenda," June 5). Charter schools are public schools like Hamilton, they get their funding from the Baltimore City Public Schools system and their teachers are Baltimore City public school teachers. Moreover, the type of kids served by charters are the same as those served by traditional public schools.
NEWS
By Ricarda Easton and Will McKenna | May 7, 2014
Ten years ago, Baltimore students were able for the first time to enroll in public charter schools, which brought a fresh approach to education in the city. Publicly funded and part of the Baltimore City Public Schools, charter schools are run by independent operators who develop an academic approach and governance model to engage families in public education in new ways. These schools are held accountable for driving student achievement and for being well managed. Today, Baltimore is fortunate to have 31 charters across the city, many of which are integral parts of the education landscape.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
For once I agree with Marta Mossburg, that something needs to be done about Baltimore City public schools ("Baltimore City schoolchildren deserve a real choice," Sept. 12). But I'm very curious where she came up with the numbers she uses to push her idea for vouchers. Unless she's living in a very different world from Baltimore, her numbers just don't add up. She says that Baltimore City spends $14,711 per student, which she says is the third highest in the nation. That may be true, but then she follows it up by saying, "Private school costs are lower than public school costs" and that a voucher system would cost only $42,00 per pupil over a three year period.
NEWS
June 8, 2014
After reading the recent letter from Hamilton Elementary Middle School parents, it is clear there are severe misperceptions floating around about Baltimore City public charter schools ( "MarylandCAN isn't interested in kids but in pushing an anti-public school agenda," June 5). Charter schools are public schools like Hamilton, they get their funding from the Baltimore City Public Schools system and their teachers are Baltimore City public school teachers. Moreover, the type of kids served by charters are the same as those served by traditional public schools.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
Once again, the Baltimore City Public Schools are facing a multi-million dollar budget shortfall ( "Seeing red over city schools budget," April 15). Unfortunately, this is not a new occurrence, but what is stunning to me this time is the reaction of the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners. The commissioners express surprise and "wonder" that the system got to this point. Let's consider some of the items that caused this surprise - grant funds that always have expiration dates, the highly-touted new facilities plan that will require at least $20 million per year for the foreseeable future and the new teacher evaluation system which calls for an unknowable expenditures for teacher performance.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
Regarding The Sun's recent editorial on the Baltimore City Public Schools $31 million shortfall, budgetary issues under any domain are very serious matters ( "Seeing red over city schools budget," April 15). Whenever a group of decision makers without strong and practical fiscal skills are the ones being relied upon for providing oversight and control for making very difficult budgetary decisions, there will always be illogical responses. Why would any competent decision maker consider depleting their "rainy day fund" for resolving operational type issues, especially when that source of revenue is not adequately funded in the first place?
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