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May 26, 2004
On May 20, 2004, MILTON JOHN KILMAR, devoted member of Mars Hill Baptist Church and a Shift Supervisor of the Baltimore City Public Schools repair shop. Memorial Service will be held on Wednesday, May 26 at 7 P.M. at Mars Hill Baptist Church, 1400 Old Eastern Ave, Essex.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
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NEWS
March 5, 2007
On February 28, 2007, CAROLYN C. HOLMES. Longtime counselor for Baltimore City Public Schools. On Monday friends may call at the VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES, 5151 Baltimore National Pike, from 4:00 to 8:00 P.M. On Tuesday, Ms. Carolyn C. Holmes will lie instate at Wayland Baptist Church, 3200 Garrison Blvd., where the family will receive friends from 10:00 to 11:00 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 233-2400.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | January 24, 2013
At first glance, Dayvon Love is easy to overlook. At 5 foot 9, he has average height and a slightly larger than average build. As he carefully takes in everything and everyone in a room, he might initially seem painfully shy. So when he finally speaks, his observations can hit you like a punch you had no idea was coming. He says that in his experience as a teacher, most Baltimore City Public Schools students think of your average teacher as "someone who's not cool or smart enough to do anything else.
NEWS
By ROBERT T. RINALDI | June 18, 1995
Your recent editorial entitled, ''Futility in the Schools'' (June 11), although positively addressing the success of the Calvert curriculum at the Barclay school, still misses the mark.As school systems go, the Baltimore City Public Schools is a good one. Its rate of improvement in test scores and attendance is the highest among American cities and surpasses surrounding Maryland counties.As urban school systems go, Baltimore's public schools are excellent nurturing environments for the children of the city.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | May 31, 1996
Israelis didn't vote against peace. They voted that Arabs oppose peace. Arabs saw Israelis vote against peace. Welcome to Square One.Bringing down Jim Guy Tucker is like aiming at a goose and hitting a pigeon. The goose still flies. Starr hunter gets one more shot.Baltimore County Public Schools should (A) bring back Stuart Berger; (B) merge with Baltimore City Public Schools; (C) get taken over by the state or (D) carry on as though nothing is wrong. Choose one.Cal's back.Pub Date: 5/31/96
NEWS
November 27, 2005
BARBARA LEE COLBERT WILKES, passed peacefully into her new life on November 21, 2005 surrounded by her family and friends. Born in Baltimore November 1928, daughter of Alice Colbert. She received her formal education from the Baltimore City Public Schools and graduated from St. Francis College 1946, Morgan State College 1950. She continued her educational studies at Coppin State College earning a Master of Arts Degree in Special Education. She retired in 1993 after 34 years of teaching in the Baltimore City Public Schools.
NEWS
February 14, 2005
Melva L. Greene, a retired Baltimore City public schools administrator, died of cancer Feb. 6 at the Woodlawn home of a friend where she was receiving medical care. She was 62. Born Melva Lee Powell in Baltimore and raised in West Baltimore, she was a 1960 Western High School graduate and earned an education degree from what is now Towson University and a master's degree from Loyola College in Maryland. She also studied at the University of Maryland, College Park. Mrs. Green retired from Baltimore City public schools in 2002, with 38 years of service as an educator and supervisor.
NEWS
By Jacqueline Seaberg and Jacqueline Seaberg,Baltimoresun.com Staff | April 8, 2004
Several homes and businesses were without water for about four hours today after a 10-inch water main broke in Baltimore County near the city line. The incident occurred about 11 a.m. in the 6000 block of Falls Road at Lake Ave., city officials said. Although the break occurred in the county, the water main is owned and operated by the city of Baltimore. "A contractor actually struck the water main and broke it," said Cathy Powell, a Baltimore City Public Works spokeswoman. Repairs were completed at 2:45 this afternoon and all customers affected now have water service restored, Powell said.
NEWS
By Jacqueline Seaberg and Jacqueline Seaberg,Baltimoresun.com Staff | April 1, 2004
Fire and water caused two Baltimore City public schools to close early today, according to officials. Thurgood Marshall High School at 5001 Sinclair Lane was closed at 11 a.m. due to a fire in a janitors' closet. The fire started at 9:44 a.m. and was extinguished within five minutes, fire officials said. No one was injured and the fire was confined to the closet. Smoke was reported on the second floor and students waited in the cafeteria until they were dismissed later that morning, according to school authorities.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
John L. Crew Sr., a career educator whose seven-year tenure as superintendent of Baltimore City public schools in the late 1970s and early 1980s was marked by rising student achievement — and by a reputation as a steady and calming influence — died Saturday of dementia at FutureCare Lochearn. The longtime Ashburton resident was 85. "I knew John when he was superintendent of schools and we both served in the mayor's cabinet," recalled Dr. Linwood Ivey, who retired in 1989 as director of the city's Urban Services Agency.
NEWS
September 8, 2009
For too long, Baltimore has been shy about selling itself as a place to live. Anyone contemplating a move to the area is much more likely to be shown around the suburbs than the city - especially if that person has kids. Chalk it up to the city's exaggerated reputation as a hive of poverty and crime, or perhaps to the inferiority complex of a place sandwiched between the better-known municipalities of Washington and Philadelphia. But even as the pace of population loss in the city has slowed to almost nothing, the military's Base Relocation and Closure process has given the city rare hope for a rapid influx of new residents.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | January 2, 2008
Ellis A. Boston, an attorney and businessman who helped pioneer labor negotiations in Baltimore's public school system, died of lung cancer Dec. 23 at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Ellicott City resident turned 70 the day he died. Mr. Boston was born in East Baltimore near Dunbar Senior High School, the son of a steelworker father and homemaker mother. He bagged and delivered groceries and worked at Gordon's Seafood House while in elementary school and started his own car-washing business while in high school.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,sun reporter | August 22, 2007
The Baltimore Teachers Union is asking teachers to "work to rule" when classes start next week because negotiations on a new two-year contract have stalled over planning time for teachers, a union leader said yesterday. Contract talks have reached an impasse, said Marietta English, president of the teachers' chapter of the Baltimore Teachers Union. The union, which also represents paraprofessionals, plans to ask the Maryland State Department of Education to move negotiations to a fact-finding phase to resolve the issue.
NEWS
March 5, 2007
On February 28, 2007, CAROLYN C. HOLMES. Longtime counselor for Baltimore City Public Schools. On Monday friends may call at the VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES, 5151 Baltimore National Pike, from 4:00 to 8:00 P.M. On Tuesday, Ms. Carolyn C. Holmes will lie instate at Wayland Baptist Church, 3200 Garrison Blvd., where the family will receive friends from 10:00 to 11:00 A.M., with services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 233-2400.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | January 30, 2007
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon and Gov. Martin O'Malley announced yesterday that they have appointed a former principal, an attorney and a children's television host to the city school board. Dixon and O'Malley also reappointed two board members, Chairman Brian D. Morris and Vice Chair Jerrelle F. Francois, whose terms expired July 1. The new faces on the nine-member board are Maxine Wood, Neil E. Duke and Robert Heck. They are filling open seats created by resignations. The mayor and the governor appoint the city school board jointly.
NEWS
By Catherine E. Pugh | February 4, 1992
1855 -- Edward Draper became the first black Marylander to earn a college degree. He received his degree from Dartmouth College.1872 -- Dr. Whitfield Winsey was the first black physician to come to Baltimore and be permitted to practice medicine. Winsey graduated from Howard University Medical School.1885 -- Everett J. Waring became the first black lawyer to be admitted to the Maryland Bar Association. He was graduated from Howard University Law School. Waring was also admitted to practice before the state appellate court and the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
March 30, 1997
THE CIRCUMSTANCES were not auspicious for the reform-driven experiment known as the Stadium School. An audit begun earlier this year by the Baltimore City public school system has found less-than-stellar test scores at the non-traditional school. This news comes just as the legislature appears poised to enact a city-state partnership that will do away with the current local school board and relieve the superintendent of his responsibilities.Is the threat to one of the more promising efforts for city kids simply a matter of holding the school to its own promises, or does this news fit more neatly into the category of revenge?
NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
Lloyd Eugene "Gene" Quandred Prettyman, a former teacher and swing band member whose memories are preserved in the Peabody Institute's oral archives of African-American musicians, died in his sleep Monday at his West Baltimore home. He was 98. Mr. Prettyman worked for Baltimore City public schools as a teacher and, later, as a counselor. He also was active for decades in the Boy Scouts of America. But he will be remembered thanks to the archives for his days as a 1920s touring musician.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 13, 2006
Dear Oprah: I know how you can help Baltimore City public school students without giving money to Baltimore City public schools. I'm sure you can afford the sum I have in mind. You could hock a couple of rings, or some shoes, and make the donation -- and make a difference. Make a difference without making a donation to the city schools. You apparently thought about doing that but decided it would be a waste of money. How did you put it for WBAL-TV the other day? "You might as well pee on it."
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