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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2010
Baltimore Judge Martin P. Welch, who's served on the city's circuit court for 18 years, has become the new chief judge, replacing John N. Prevas, who died of a heart attack Monday. The title is bestowed on the most senior judge, who then presides over judicial ceremonies and signs official correspondence, including summonses. It doesn't come with a salary increase — just prestige. Welch, who was named to the post Tuesday, is thought to be the city's second black chief judge, behind Clifton J. Gordy, who briefly held the post in 2006 before retiring.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
The 21-year-old man Baltimore officials had called a suspect in the killing of 3-year-old McKenzie Elliott was released from jail Wednesday after two months without being charged in the fatal shooting. Asked whether the man is still considered a person of interest in the case, the Baltimore Police Department released a statement saying the investigation "has shifted. " "We have substantial leads that we are continuing to follow," the statement read. Officials declined to elaborate.
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NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | November 25, 1990
Two District Court judges were named yesterday by Gov. William Donald Schaefer to Circuit Court vacancies in Baltimore City and Carroll County.In the city, Mr. Schaefer's choice of Judge Andre Maurice Davis marked the second time this fall that he has elevated a black member of the lower court to the white-dominated circuit bench.Judge Davis, 41, replaces Judge Mary Arabian, a close friend and former law partner of the governor who retired earlier this year and who was named yesterday to the University of Maryland Board of Regents.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A Baltimore jury has awarded nearly $2.1 million to a 17-year-old city youth who was allegedly poisoned by lead paint in the 1990s when he was a toddler in an East Baltimore rental home. The judgment against Elliot Dackman and the estates of Sandra and Bernard Dackman came Friday in Baltimore Circuit Court, at the end of the weeklong trial of a lawsuit brought on behalf of Daquantay Robinson by his mother, Tiesha Robinson. The jury verdict shows the long-running tide of litigation over the widespread use of lead-based paint in Baltimore's older rental housing has yet to ebb, according to Bruce Powell, the Robinsons' lawyer.
NEWS
May 23, 1991
Based on more than 40 interviews, The Evening Sun's recent series on deal-making in Baltimore Circuit Court showed that:* Plea bargaining -- the practice of exchanging leniency for guilty pleas -- has become a way of life in a judicial system choked with drug cases. Throughout city Circuit Court, guilty pleas decide more than 90 percent of the criminal cases that proceed all the way to conviction or acquittal.* Prosecutors must trade reduced sentences for guilty pleas because there is not enough time, money, courtrooms or prison space to vigorously prosecute every accused criminal.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2010
A former Baltimore police officer was sentenced to five years in federal prison Wednesday for assaulting a 17-year-old and falsifying documents to cover up the attack, the U.S. Department of Justice announced. In May, a jury convicted Gregory Mussmacher, 35, of violating the young man's civil rights and obstructing justice by creating phony police reports. "The power that accompanies a police officer's badge does not give the officer the right to violate the civil rights of those in his or her custody," Thomas E. Perez, Assistant Attorney General for the DOJ's Civil rights Division, said in a statement.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 19, 2014
Two years after someone fired 18 bullets into his body, we finally know the reason Gregory McFadden died such a brutal death at the age of 27 in West Baltimore. He turned his back on a guy. It was disrespect, a malady that inflames the male ego and makes young men do terrible things. Disrespect has been around for centuries, of course, but its consequences have been particularly lethal in the age of the high-powered handgun. Killing someone because he disrespected you is a phenomenon that no amount of police power or community vigilance can seem to stop.
NEWS
March 15, 2008
A man found fatally shot on a West Baltimore street Thursday evening was identified yesterday as Jamal Alphonso Harrison, 22, of Randallstown, according to a city police spokeswoman. Police said Harrison was found about 6:10 p.m. lying in the 1900 block of N. Rosedale St., near North Avenue, suffering from at least one gunshot wound to the head. He was pronounced dead at the scene. Officer Nicole Monroe, the spokeswoman, said Harrison's last known address was his parents' house in the 9900 block of Shoshone Way. But Monroe said the victim had recently moved in with his girlfriend in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A Baltimore jury has awarded nearly $2.1 million to a 17-year-old city youth who was allegedly poisoned by lead paint in the 1990s when he was a toddler in an East Baltimore rental home. The judgment against Elliot Dackman and the estates of Sandra and Bernard Dackman came Friday in Baltimore Circuit Court, at the end of the weeklong trial of a lawsuit brought on behalf of Daquantay Robinson by his mother, Tiesha Robinson. The jury verdict shows the long-running tide of litigation over the widespread use of lead-based paint in Baltimore's older rental housing has yet to ebb, according to Bruce Powell, the Robinsons' lawyer.
NEWS
By From staff reports | June 12, 2004
In Baltimore City Man, 36, sentenced for killing of teen A Baltimore County man was sentenced to 25 years in prison yesterday after pleading guilty to killing a 16-year-old boy last year in West Baltimore, according to the state's attorney's office. James Keith Ford, 36, of the 3900 block of Rolling Road pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and a handgun violation in Baltimore City Circuit Court. Judge John M. Glynn sentenced Ford to 25 years for the murder conviction and to 20 years -- to be served concurrently -- for the gun charge.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
A South Baltimore man filed a lawsuit Monday against a city police officer, accusing the officer of punching him repeatedly during a June arrest — an incident that was captured on video. Kollin Truss and Officer Vincent E. Cosom argued a few moments before the arrest, but a woman with Truss had separated the pair, and Truss was apparently walking away from police when they decided to make an arrest. "This attack was completely unprovoked and served no legitimate law enforcement purpose," Truss' attorneys, Ivan J. Bates and Tony N. Garcia, wrote in a complaint filed in Baltimore Circuit Court.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
President Barack Obama, who is attempting to help Democrats maintain their grip on the Senate, will attend a fundraiser Friday at the home of a wealthy Baltimore hedge fund manager who has become one of the nation's foremost advocates for Israel. Howard E. Friedman, a former president of the powerful American Israel Public Affairs Committee, or AIPAC, and a leading patron of Jewish political causes, will host Obama for a dinner that will cost guests up to $32,400 - the maximum an individual may give to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in the calendar year.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
A veteran defense attorney running an independent campaign for Baltimore state's attorney was dealt a significant setback Friday when elections officials determined that he did not collect enough signatures to appear on the November ballot. Russell A. Neverdon Sr. fell more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn J. Mosby, a city official said. Neverdon said he will appeal the decision to Baltimore Circuit Court and, failing that, would consider running a write-in campaign for the job. "This fight has not ended by any stretch of the imagination," Neverdon said outside the offices of the Baltimore City Board of Elections.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 19, 2014
Levi Watkins, the pioneering cardiac surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, remembers the date — January 15 — because it was the anniversary of the birth of Martin Luther King Jr., and because what happened that night still makes him ache. It was 1979, and Watkins, the first black chief resident in cardiac surgery at Hopkins, had just left his office after conferring with a senior medical student named Alan Trimakas. They had agreed on the subject of a research project — cardiac neoplasms, tumors of the heart or heart valves.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 5, 2014
The tree still lives at the corner of Wolfe and Monument streets, in the midst of the sprawling Johns Hopkins Hospital complex of East Baltimore. The tree lives in memory of Alan Trimakas, a medical student who never got to be the doctor he wanted to be and that the world surely needed. Classmates of Trimakas planted the tree a few months after his senseless, infuriating death. A senior in the Hopkins medical school, Trimakas specialized in internal medicine and cardiology; he wanted to be a cardiologist.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
A Baltimore man dubbed "Public Enemy No. 1" by city police last summer after being linked to a string of shootings is in trouble again - this time accused of stabbing another inmate in the head in an argument over using the telephone, court records show. Darryl Martin Anderson's nickname apparently has had staying power even as Anderson remains in jail awaiting trial, according to charging documents. When police asked the victim, inmate Gregory Hollomon, who had stabbed him, he replied, "Public Enemy No. 1. " Anderson, 26, was arrested in Alabama last summer after a yearlong hunt by authorities in two jurisdictions.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | December 11, 1991
The Harford County school board deferred until Monday a vote on the construction contract for a new middle school in Fallston after learning that the low bidder recently pleaded guilty to violating state minority subcontracting laws.Larry Klimovitz, the county administrator, sought the delay so that officials could investigate a Baltimore Circuit Court case involving the H.A. Harris Corp. of Towson, which submitted a $9.31 million bid to build the Fallston school that will have a capacity of 900 students.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and John Fritze and Julie Bykowicz and John Fritze,sun reporters | June 19, 2008
Former Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Clark will not get his job back, a city judge has ruled. Saying Clark's case was flawed and that returning him to office would create too much chaos, Circuit Judge Carol E. Smith on Tuesday denied the former commissioner's motion for reinstatement. Clark, who says he was wrongly dismissed in 2004, is also suing the city for $120 million. The case returned to city court after the state's highest court, the Court of Appeals, sided with Clark in a March ruling, saying that mayors may fire commissioners only under certain circumstances.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
For the first time in eight years, Baltimore's judges face a challenger at the polls, a former city prosecutor who aims to knock veteran judge Alfred Nance from the bench. Page Croyder, 58, said she is running for election because of what she sees as Nance's lack of decorum on the bench and poor treatment of women who come into his courtroom. "I'm running because I care about the judiciary and I think people deserve judges who are going to treat them respectfully," Croyder said.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Kimberly Smith believed she was "in good hands" when she rented an East Baltimore rowhouse nearly 20 years ago that was part of a Kennedy Krieger Institute study of lead paint remediation techniques. Kennedy Krieger takes care of children, Smith thought at the time. One of her children had suffered lead poisoning when the family had lived elsewhere, she recalled in a recent interview, and she was pregnant then with her fourth child, Cecil. "I was told it was a great opportunity - it was lead-safe," Smith said.
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