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NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2010
This year's fundraiser for the Baltimore Choral Arts Society had an added kick. During the cocktail hour at the Grand Lodge in Hunt Valley, the air was abuzz with excitement over Mark Nadler , this year's featured performer at "A Ruby Cabaret." Nadler is known for his own personal brand of zippiness. "Mark is one of the nicest guys in the business. He's also very funny. He's one of the great personalities in the music business," said Tom Hall , BCA music director, as he and BCA executive director Linda Moxley greeted guests.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Date: Aug. 2 Her story: Catherine "Cat" Yard, 25, grew up in Ewing, N.J. She is an artist and regularly models for figure drawing and painting classes at Maryland Institute College of Art , the Johns Hopkins University, Towson University and the Mitchell School of Fine Arts in Baltimore. She and her husband are ensemble cast members performing with the Baltimore Rock Opera Society in "The Electric Pharaoh," which opens Oct. 17. Her parents, Kathleen and Duane Yard, live in Ewing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Last weekend saw two more entries in Baltimore's 2013-14 music season, each yielding rewards. Saturday night at the Gordon Center, Concert Artists of Baltimore offered an unusual pairing -- Schubert on the first half, Rachmaninoff and Prokofiev on the second. If there was a secret to the combination, artistic director Edward Polochick didn't make it clear in his lengthy, sometimes fuzzy remarks woven throughout the evening (like most of us, he could use an editor). What mattered in the end, though, was all the stylish music-making.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
John Weber, a tenor who sang in opera productions and was the music director of a Rodgers Forge church, died of an apparent heart attack Jan. 17. The Catonsville resident was 50. His brother, Thomas Proveaux, said Mr. Weber collapsed at the wheel of his car while driving on West Forest Park Avenue. He was taken to Sinai Hospital, where his death was confirmed. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of John Borst Weber, a Baltimore County police officer, and Eileen O'Sullivan Weber, a Western Electric worker and homemaker.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff is best known for two wildly popular piano concertos, his sumptuous Second Symphony and some brilliant solo keyboard music. But if he had written nothing but the "All-Night Vigil," an unaccompanied choral work from 1915 also known as the "Vespers," Rachmaninoff would still rank among the greats. This subtly powerful setting of texts from the Russian Orthodox liturgy will be performed by the Baltimore Choral Arts Society in an unusual presentation incorporating readings from by Shakespeare, Chekhov and others.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen , fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 12, 2009
John W. Rach, a retired CSX executive and church organist who was also a longtime Baltimore Choral Arts Society volunteer, died Wednesday of prostate cancer at the Oak Crest Village retirement community. He was 87. Mr. Rach, the son of a Koppers Co. designer and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Lake Montebello neighborhood. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1939, he earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1943.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 12, 2009
John W. Rach, a retired CSX executive and church organist who was also a longtime Baltimore Choral Arts Society volunteer, died Wednesday of prostate cancer at the Oak Crest Village retirement community. He was 87. Mr. Rach, the son of a Koppers Co. designer and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Lake Montebello neighborhood. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1939, he earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1943.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 15, 2011
Robert F. Twynham, the long-serving organist and music director at the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Mary Our Queen who created a popular Sunday musical series, died of a gastric obstruction March 23 at his Reservoir Hill home. He was 80. Though deaf in one ear and blind in one eye, he led the musical program at the cathedral for 37 years. News articles said he served under six rectors and three archbishops, two of them cardinals. He established a much-praised choral department, composed several major sacred works and a library of music for weekly worship, presented a long-running weekly concert series and oversaw sacred music-dramas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Sunday's musical splendors, for me, started with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society's season finale in the afternoon at Grace United Methodist Church. The cleverly constructed program gave audiences a chance to compare different settings of the same texts. Tom Hall, longtime artistic director of the chorus, chose a good number of pieces with spiritual texts, mixing in a little Shakespeare along the way. The composers represented were decidedly tonal in orientation, and several shared a rather generic style (I would have loved at least one walk on the wild side)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Last weekend saw two more entries in Baltimore's 2013-14 music season, each yielding rewards. Saturday night at the Gordon Center, Concert Artists of Baltimore offered an unusual pairing -- Schubert on the first half, Rachmaninoff and Prokofiev on the second. If there was a secret to the combination, artistic director Edward Polochick didn't make it clear in his lengthy, sometimes fuzzy remarks woven throughout the evening (like most of us, he could use an editor). What mattered in the end, though, was all the stylish music-making.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Sunday's musical splendors, for me, started with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society's season finale in the afternoon at Grace United Methodist Church. The cleverly constructed program gave audiences a chance to compare different settings of the same texts. Tom Hall, longtime artistic director of the chorus, chose a good number of pieces with spiritual texts, mixing in a little Shakespeare along the way. The composers represented were decidedly tonal in orientation, and several shared a rather generic style (I would have loved at least one walk on the wild side)
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2012
Peter Marvit, a 51-year-old scientist who sang with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society and sought to widen music education opportunities for city students, died at Johns Hopkins Hospital after he was shot near his Northeast Baltimore home last Monday night. He had been returning home from a choral rehearsal. "If there was anyone who really had a great love of the city, he was it," said Susie Brandt, his companion, who also said he had diverse interests. "He never wanted to be boring.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Anne B. Leavitt, a retired registered nurse and an alto singer who was a longtime member of the Emmanuel Episcopal Church Choir and Baltimore Choral Arts Society, died June 21 of a stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 79. The daughter of a dentist and a registered nurse, Anne Lovelace Gorsuch Benson was born in Baltimore and raised in St. Margarets and in a home next door to the old Marconi's restaurant on West Saratoga Street. Mrs. Leavitt was a 1950 graduate of Eastern High School and earned her nursing degree at the old Hospital for the Women of Maryland in Bolton Hill.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
Robert F. Twynham, the long-serving organist and music director at the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Mary Our Queen who created a popular Sunday musical series, died of a gastric obstruction March 23 at his Reservoir Hill home. He was 80. Though deaf in one ear and blind in one eye, he led the musical program at the cathedral for 37 years. News articles said he served under six rectors and three archbishops, two of them cardinals. He established a much-praised choral department, composed several major sacred works and a library of music for weekly worship, presented a long-running weekly concert series and oversaw sacred music-dramas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff is best known for two wildly popular piano concertos, his sumptuous Second Symphony and some brilliant solo keyboard music. But if he had written nothing but the "All-Night Vigil," an unaccompanied choral work from 1915 also known as the "Vespers," Rachmaninoff would still rank among the greats. This subtly powerful setting of texts from the Russian Orthodox liturgy will be performed by the Baltimore Choral Arts Society in an unusual presentation incorporating readings from by Shakespeare, Chekhov and others.
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