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By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1998
Like detectives, they knock on the doors of hundreds of Baltimore families, leave notes when no one answers, and coax their way in when someone does. They're after one valuable piece of information: Does your toddler have all his shots?For Baltimore health officials, that question has long been an embarrassing one. Just five years ago, the city posted mediocre immunization rates -- only 55 percent of 2- and 3-year-olds. But today, with about 85 percent coverage, Baltimore boasts one of the best rates in the country.
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NEWS
August 2, 2014
Two town hall meetings presenting the implementation of new curfew hours for Baltimore children left many attendees with serious unanswered questions ( "Residents see some gray areas in city's new curfew," July 21). While the mayor's presenting panel gave passionate testimony as to why the curfew is being enacted, the people of Baltimore were not allowed the time nor given the respect we were expecting. One member of the audience did ask for more time for the community to have input before the curfew start date, but that question was not answered.
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FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
Michelle Damareck's 3-year-old daughter has been singing "The Itsy-Bitsy Spider" in Hebrew, and her 5-year-old son has been learning the lessons of the Ten Commandments, thanks to a program that delivers Jewish-themed books and CDs to their home every month, free of charge. The program, called PJ Library, is run by the Harold Grinspoon Foundation, based in Massachussetts. Since its creation in 2005, it has delivered more than 3 million books to tens of thousands of Jewish families in 175 communities throughout the United States and Canada, including the Lutherville home of the Damarecks.
NEWS
By Patricia Schultheis | May 19, 2014
About a dozen years ago, when the church I attend launched a mentoring program at Baltimore's Dickey Hill Elementary School, my long association with Jabril Leach began. The second-grader had a passion for dinosaurs, a severe speech impediment and a mother in prison - a situation requiring firm boundaries, lest Jabril regard me as a substitute parent.  I determined that my role would be to establish trust but not dependency. So, armed with checkers, some crayons - Jabril loved to draw - and "Ping," a book about a Chinese duck, Jabril and I met week after week in the school's hallway and got to know each other.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1998
Allie Harper has studied poverty in the hallowed halls of Harvard University and the streets of Baltimore. She likes the front-row view from Baltimore better.In her Ivy League classroom, the 19-year-old became "frustrated because everything people have tried to solve poverty in our cities hasn't worked." But this summer, getting paid $10 an hour by the nonprofit Safe and Sound Campaign to venture into local neighborhoods, the Roland Park native found hope.Harper, a sophomore, is part of a four-person "mapping" team of college-age students who spent the summer compiling statistics for Safe and Sound on after-school and out-of-school activities for Baltimore children, especially the disadvantaged.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2000
WASHINGTON - After hearing federal lawmakers yesterday address the dismemberment of children and adults in her small West African nation, Memunatu Mansaray, 4, extended her arm - a stump, hacked above the elbow in civil war strife - to a Baltimore schoolgirl of 9, Richelle Ford, who beamed and scooped her up in a flash. Memunatu was one of six children and two adults who arrived last week from an African amputee camp to tell their stories to Congress and to receive medical treatment in the United States.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1996
When teacher Wynonia Rhock raises her manicured hand and says, "My turn," eight Baltimore children look up and know that it is time to read."Get ready," she says, her red-and-black nails flashing before the third-graders who are learning phonics at Robert W. Coleman Elementary School, near Mondawmin Mall.They are poised at the start of a lesson in blending letter sounds, and at the launch of a project intended to change the way Baltimore children learn to read.The Baltimore Curriculum project, backed by the Abell Foundation, has introduced a strict phonics teaching plan to six elementary schools, and eventually may offer it citywide.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | December 12, 1993
Children streamed through the Brokerage yesterday during a free multicultural holiday celebration, promoting the future home the Baltimore Children's Museum and the revitalization of the Market Place corridor.Activities and craft vendors at "Market Place Holiday Happenings" centered on Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanza, with entertainment and booths promoting local children's attractions. Organizers for the Baltimore Development Corp. said several thousand visited the one-day event.The busiest -- and glitziest -- corner was run by the Baltimore Children's Museum itself, where children from toddlers to preteens made peace doves from handprints, stamped Hanukkah prints, and cut and pasted skyscraping Kwanza hats.
NEWS
November 8, 2002
FOR DECADES, as many as 7,000 Baltimore children were exposed to lead paint poisoning every year. Many of them needed a painful hospital treatment that was, in some cases, too late to prevent irreversible damage. Laws were passed to protect these children, but little was done to prosecute landlords who failed to make their properties lead-safe. During the 1990s, not a single lawsuit was filed in Baltimore to force compliance with a law that would have been effective -- if used. Every child who falls prey to toxic lead dust or paint chips can suffer impaired brain and nervous system development.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2002
A Baltimore lawyer who once worked for the city is suing the City Council and Mayor Martin O'Malley for allowing the Port Discovery building near the Inner Harbor to be used as a public high school. Darcy Massof, who was chief counsel for the Baltimore Department of Social Services before going into private practice, filed a lawsuit yesterday in Circuit Court saying that the lease of the Port Discovery building to Baltimore public schools is illegal and that the city could be losing up to $5 million in potential business development deals by holding classes there.
NEWS
February 18, 2014
Baltimore's next schools CEO, Gregory Thornton, is no stranger to the city. Though he has most recently led Milwaukee's schools and previously worked in Philadelphia and Montgomery County, he interviewed for the top job here in 2007, ultimately losing out to Andrés Alonso. And he visited earlier in his career, when he worked in the Washington suburbs. We are eager to hear more about his ideas for Baltimore, and we hope he meets with great success here. Having said that, however, there are a few things the new schools CEO might find useful to know about Baltimore that someone in his position is only likely to learn from actually working here.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2013
More than 800 students in Baltimore will receive a new coat this holiday season thanks to a partnership between Baltimore firefighters, police and elected officials. The mayor, city council and first responders teamed with Operation Warm, a non-profit providing for children in need. Its the second year Baltimore firefighters have provided coats for the city's children, according to a news release. Firefighters and police will visit head start programs this week to surprise children with coats - which will be individually fitted for each child.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
I am writing in response to the recent commentary regarding foster care, "How Maryland robs its most vulnerable children," (Oct. 14). The author incorrectly asserts that the Department of Human Resources is improperly taking assets from children in its care. The truth is that Maryland is among at least 39 states that routinely apply for Social Security benefits on behalf of the children in its custody and use those benefits to partially cover the cost of their care. Every dime goes to helping that child.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
If you haven't been paying attention to Maryland's governor's race, now might be the time to start. Today's J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake in Crisfield marks a highlight of the early retail politicking phase before next June's party primaries - it was a rare opportunity to see all of the major candidates in the same place at the same time - but it also comes amid a number of more substantive developments in the contest to succeed Gov. Martin O'Malley....
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2013
The Baltimore-based NAACP and the pastor of a city mega-church were among those calling Sunday for a federal civil rights case against George Zimmerman after the Florida man was acquitted in the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager. Meanwhile, a crowd numbering between 300 and 400 rallied at Baltimore's Inner Harbor to register frustration and dismay with the late Saturday verdict in the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. "It was like it was my child," said Debora Evans, 57, of Baltimore, who attended the rally and choked up when she spoke about the verdict.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Baltimore schools chief Andrés Alonso went to Annapolis last year seeking approval for a bold $2 billion plan to replace many of the city system's crumbling buildings. The idea didn't even make it out of committee. Prospects still looked bleak in January when the Senate president described the financial package as "ridiculous. " But by the end of the legislative session in April, a $1 billion version of the proposal had cleared both chambers by overwhelming margins. The plan - signed into law Thursday by Gov. Martin O'Malley - went from ridiculous to reality because of hard work by scores of people in both Baltimore and Annapolis, and a host of political forces were in play.
NEWS
August 2, 2014
Two town hall meetings presenting the implementation of new curfew hours for Baltimore children left many attendees with serious unanswered questions ( "Residents see some gray areas in city's new curfew," July 21). While the mayor's presenting panel gave passionate testimony as to why the curfew is being enacted, the people of Baltimore were not allowed the time nor given the respect we were expecting. One member of the audience did ask for more time for the community to have input before the curfew start date, but that question was not answered.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2001
Robert L. Peltzer, who for 27 years was East Baltimore's impresario of sports, hobbies and pets, died Tuesday of heart disease at Franklin Square Hospital Center. He was 69. From 1964 to 1991, he owned Peltzer's Sport Shop in the 2300 block of Monument St. For much of that time, he owned a pet shop next door. Down the block, he built and ran an eight-lane racetrack for model cars, where 50 cents bought a half-hour's worth of hairpin thrills. An only child, Mr. Peltzer was the father of 12 children -- four children from his first marriage, seven stepchildren and an East Baltimore boy who moved into the family's rambling house in Bowleys Quarters, said his wife, Ann Peltzer.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
The United Way of Central Maryland will provide nearly $3 million in community grants intended to provide financial stability to families, quality education to children and healthy alternatives to individuals, the organization said this week. In all, 71 nonprofit programs will receive funding to change the lives of impoverished Marylanders. The money is expected to help offset a loss in services some may experience as a result of federal sequestration. "Our region is simultaneously experiencing increases in poverty rates and government cuts to critical social programs," said Dominique Moore, chairwoman of the local United Way's Baltimore City Partnership Board.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
Michelle Damareck's 3-year-old daughter has been singing "The Itsy-Bitsy Spider" in Hebrew, and her 5-year-old son has been learning the lessons of the Ten Commandments, thanks to a program that delivers Jewish-themed books and CDs to their home every month, free of charge. The program, called PJ Library, is run by the Harold Grinspoon Foundation, based in Massachussetts. Since its creation in 2005, it has delivered more than 3 million books to tens of thousands of Jewish families in 175 communities throughout the United States and Canada, including the Lutherville home of the Damarecks.
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