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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
Eliyahu Werdesheim avoided a prison sentence Wednesday for the 2010 attack of a black teenager in Northwest Baltimore, in a case that heightened community divides. Werdesheim, a former member of an Orthodox Jewish citizens' watch group, was sentenced to three years' probation by Baltimore Circuit Judge Pamela J. White for second-degree assault and false imprisonment. Werdesheim, now 24, had faced up to 10 years in prison for the Nov. 19, 2010 assault on Corey Ausby, who was then 15 years old. Much of the two-hour hearing was devoted to remarks by nine Werdesheim supporters, including Baltimore business leaders, a rabbi and one of his college professors.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Baltimore's private dining clubs, longtime bastions of business networking and deal-making, are loosening up in an effort to attract a younger generation to keep their doors open. Dress codes are easing and lower dues are offered for young members at the Engineers Club of Baltimore in Mount Vernon and the Center Club downtown on the 16th floor of the Transamerica tower. Both have invested millions of dollars over the last five years to revamp aging facilities and maintain the appeal of exclusivity to attract those with money to spend.
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BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2001
The Reeves Agency Inc., a Baltimore-based advertising and public relations business that was started in 1978, has declared Chapter 7 bankruptcy, reporting more than $700,000 owed to more than 120 creditors and assets of less than $230,000. A trustee will sort through the company's finances. Neither Rebecca Reeves, president of the Reeves Agency, nor her attorney, Irving E. Walker, returned telephone calls yesterday. In a recent interview, Walker said, "For this corporation it would be a permanent closure.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Dozens of low-income middle schoolers at Baltimore's St. Ignatius Loyola Academy are getting a head start on money management, thanks to Legg Mason employees. Volunteers from the Baltimore-based money management firm regularly visit the Jesuit boys' school throughout the year to teach students how to open savings accounts, balance checkbooks and understand the taxes they'll soon have to pay. "We just don't want this to be just a financial component," said Auburn Bell, Legg Mason's director of corporate philanthropy.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 9, 2013
Steve Appel, who's been in the business of selling cool furniture to Baltimoreans since the 1980s, called me after one of my give-a-guy-a-chance columns. It was 2009, with the recession lingering and the national unemployment rate at double digits. Baltimore's was just under 11 percent — and higher, as always, among guys between 18 and 24. Appel, the affable co-owner of Nouveau Contemporary Goods in North Baltimore's Belvedere Square, had an opening for someone from that demographic to make furniture deliveries.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
The mastermind behind a series of armed robberies that killed a Greek businessman in 2009 and terrorized a half-dozen other people was sentenced to 77 years in federal prison Friday — a lengthy term that earned a round of applause from his victims at the close of the court hearing. Nikolaos Mamalis, 55, used his friendships with Maryland business owners to rob them of thousands of dollars. He had a gang of men under his control enter their homes and offices under false pretenses, leaving the business owners tied up and frightened , prosecutors said.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 8, 1990
The G. H. Dalsheimer Gallery, one of the two highest-profile fine arts galleries in Baltimore, will close in April after almost 10 years of operation on North Charles Street.In a letter sent to patrons yesterday, gallery owner George H. Dalsheimer cited his desire to "move on to other areas of interest" as the main reason for the closing.In an interview yesterday, he said, "It was not a decision that was easy to make. It makes me sad."Although both he and gallery director Robin Coplan said the decision had nothing to do with the economy, they conceded that the print market -- which accounts for 90 percent of the gallery's business -- had recently "taken a dip," in Ms. Coplan's words.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Baltimore's private dining clubs, longtime bastions of business networking and deal-making, are loosening up in an effort to attract a younger generation to keep their doors open. Dress codes are easing and lower dues are offered for young members at the Engineers Club of Baltimore in Mount Vernon and the Center Club downtown on the 16th floor of the Transamerica tower. Both have invested millions of dollars over the last five years to revamp aging facilities and maintain the appeal of exclusivity to attract those with money to spend.
NEWS
August 27, 1993
Journal owners sue business publicationCOLUMBIA -- The owners of the Baltimore Business Journal have sued a Howard County publication and its owner, alleging copyright infringement, and asking for at least $100,000 in compensatory damages and $200,000 in punitive damages.Baltimore Business Publications Inc., a subsidiary of American City Business Journals Inc., is also asking the court to prohibit the Columbia Business Journal Co. and editor and publisher Edward G. Pickett from using the words "business journal" on any of its publications.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2000
New positions Kist is product manager at Baltimore Business Baltimore Business Communications Inc. named Brian A. Kist AT&T product manager for the Timonium-based wireless products and accessories dealer. An Annapolis resident, the University of Baltimore graduate formerly was president of TeleToys & Wireless Services, now part of BBC. Hartley executive producer for ActLikeAnOwner.com ActLikeAnOwner.com, an Internet alliance of business technology professionals that is based in Columbia, appointed John Hartley as executive producer.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Joshua Cain felt miserable as his Engine 58 crew gathered in the kitchen of their Annapolis Road firehouse after a brutal blaze that ripped through several rowhouses and took hours to control. Only two months into the job as a Baltimore firefighter, he had found a dog that looked just like his childhood Belgian shepherd-poodle badly burned and not moving inside one of the ravaged homes. Cain and his colleagues sat around the kitchen table, telling stories of their own dogs. The camaraderie made him feel "like part of the team," Cain said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
William A. Hubbard, a retired chemical engineer who headed a Baltimore business that created the orange-colored coatings for Howard Johnson restaurant roofs, died of heart failure Monday at his Towson home. He was 92. Born in Rolla, Mo., he was the son of Noel Hubbard, a University of Missouri registrar, and Ruth Johns Hubbard, a syndicated newspaper artist and journalist. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Missouri in 1944, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi. Family members said he tried to enlist in the military during World War II but was turned down.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
A Baltimore man was sentenced to 27 years in prison for a 2009 armed robbery at a Baltimore business that resulted in the owner's death. Pedro Rodriguez Garcia, 35, formerly of Rosedale, robbed Constantine Frank at gunpoint, taking more than $11,000, inside Precision Vending on S. Lakewood Avenue on July 29, 2009, according to court documents. The robbery was planned by Nikolaos Mamalis, 56, of Edgewood, according to evidence presented at the trial. Garcia and Daniel Chase, 67, of New Jersey, entered the store posing as package delivery men, pointed a gun at Frank, tied him up and robbed him, court documents said.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Oh those mischievous Brenner Brothers! Mike Brenner, the founder of Betamore , a technology incubator and campus in Federal Hill, was named one of the Baltimore Business Journal's " 40 under 40 . " But when it came time for the photo, Mike Brenner's identical twin, Dan Brenner, himself a local tech leader, posed instead. "It was a thoughtful prank," said Mike Brenner in a phone interview (although, frankly, it could have been Dan Brenner on the phone for all we know)
SPORTS
By Aaron Kasinitz, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
Anthony DeLuca rolls out of bed around 2:30 most mornings. Though it's still dark when he steps through his front doors by 3:15, DeLuca can look to his left and still see his family's emus, cows, horses and chickens as he walks down a rocky driveway to his car. About 15 hours later, DeLuca will return to his Keymar home, about 10 miles north of Frederick, to care for those animals. For now, he's off to Laurel Roller Skating Center to start his day with a two-hour training session that begins at 4:30 a.m. DeLuca's morning routine is atypical for the average American 23-year old - but most 23-year-olds don't have a shot to become a world champion figure roller skater like DeLuca does.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
Even after losing Otakon, the city's biggest convention, Visit Baltimore promoted its success booking future conventions last week. Baltimore's tourism business ticked up somewhat in fiscal year 2013, which ended June 30. Visit Baltimore, the city's convention and visitors bureau, said it sold 477,764 convention room nights for future dates, the third-most of all time. Still, the loss of the giant anime convention demonstrates the need for the city to expand and refresh its convention center in the next decade as business travel rebounds, city officials said.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | September 30, 1993
The publisher of two Howard County business newspapers is changing the names of his publications after the Baltimore Business Journal filed a suit alleging that the original titles were a copyright infringement.Starting Tuesday, the Columbia Business Journal will be known as the Columbia Business Monthly and the Howard County Business Journal will be called the Howard County Business Monthly.Edward Pickett, publisher and editor of the fledgling newspapers, signed a consent injunction -- finalized yesterday -- in which he agreed not to use the words "business journal" for his publications.
NEWS
January 8, 2001
Community colleges and alliance form training consortium Anne Arundel Community College has signed an agreement with the Greater Baltimore Alliance and five other regional community colleges to form a business training consortium. The Greater Baltimore Business Training Network will develop a regional capacity to respond to the needs of existing and prospective employers, and will provide a single point of contact and accountability, AACC said in announcing the agreement. A business in search of training will contact the alliance, which will match the training needs to the institution that can best provide the instruction, AACC said.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
The dean of the Merrick School of Business at the University of Baltimore has resigned effective Aug. 1, a school spokesman confirmed Thursday. Darlene Brannigan Smith, who earned a bachelor's and master's degree from UB, joined the school as an associate dean in 2005 and became a marketing professor there in 2006, according to her curriculum vitae. She was named dean of the school in 2008. It's unclear why Smith, 57, resigned. Peter Toran, vice president for planning and external affairs at the university, said the school could not comment on personnel matters.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
In a move that might aid the port of Baltimore, the world's three largest shipping companies announced that they will form a global alliance to boost fleet capacity and reduce operating costs. If the partnership of the Maersk Line, Mediterranean Shipping Co. and CMA CGM, survives potential anti-trust hurdles, more container traffic could come Baltimore's way, port officials say. Swiss-based MSC is the port's biggest customer. "We could see MSC ships coming here carrying Maersk and CMA cargo in addition to its own. [It]
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