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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
Joel J. "Buddy" Finkelstein, a businessman who also had been the official scorer at the Civic Center for the Baltimore Bullets, died April 24 of complications from Parkinson's disease at Boca Raton Regional Hospital in Florida. The former Pikesville resident was 81. Joel Jacob Finkelstein, who was known as "Buddy," was born in Baltimore and raised on Park Heights Avenue. After graduating from City College in 1950, Mr. Finkelstein entered the University of Maryland, College Park.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Wes Unseld has never been one to seek the spotlight. Yet there he was on Thursday, surrounded by media, NBA players past and present and several hundred youngsters who packed the gym at the Unseld School in West Baltimore for the promotion of a Washington Wizards preseason basketball game to be played in Baltimore on Oct. 20. "It's a big treat for the kids here to see some of the old [Baltimore] Bullets and the new Wizards," said Unseld, 67, a Hall of Fame center who played 13 years for the franchise in both cities.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Wes Unseld has never been one to seek the spotlight. Yet there he was on Thursday, surrounded by media, NBA players past and present and several hundred youngsters who packed the gym at the Unseld School in West Baltimore for the promotion of a Washington Wizards preseason basketball game to be played in Baltimore on Oct. 20. "It's a big treat for the kids here to see some of the old [Baltimore] Bullets and the new Wizards," said Unseld, 67, a Hall of Fame center who played 13 years for the franchise in both cities.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
Joel J. "Buddy" Finkelstein, a businessman who also had been the official scorer at the Civic Center for the Baltimore Bullets, died April 24 of complications from Parkinson's disease at Boca Raton Regional Hospital in Florida. The former Pikesville resident was 81. Joel Jacob Finkelstein, who was known as "Buddy," was born in Baltimore and raised on Park Heights Avenue. After graduating from City College in 1950, Mr. Finkelstein entered the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Arnold A. "Arnie" Heft, a minor league Orioles pitcher during the 1930s who later was an NBA referee, co-owner of the Baltimore Bullets, noted horse owner and real estate entrepreneur, died in his sleep of unknown causes March 12 at Sunrise at Fox Hill Senior Living Facility in Bethesda. The former Chevy Chase resident was 94. "Never in the 10 years that I worked for him did I ever feel like I was working for him," said Tim Keefe, Mr. Heft's horse trainer. "He never put pressure on me, even though he loved to win. " "Arnie was a very friendly guy who was drawn to people, and they were drawn to him. He stood 5-7 and had a 10-foot-tall heart," said Richard Hoffberger, who had been president for 27 years of the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | February 22, 1998
They were part of a pioneering venture, the last team invited to join the mere outline of what became the major league of professional basketball. Then the totally unexpected happened: The Baltimore Bullets of 1948 became the world champions. A shock. A momentous long shot. It was that kind of a year for Harry Truman, too.Now, during this 50th anniversary season, there's no such team called the Baltimore Bullets. Only memories. The franchise went off to a Maryland suburban community, Landover, in 1973 to become the Capital (later Washington)
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Students at Dunbar will share the high school's basketball court with a few Washington Wizards next week when the team hosts a clinic in advance of its Oct. 17 return to Baltimore. The session at Dunbar, scheduled for Sept. 19 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., will be hosted by Baltimore native and Dunbar graduate Sam Cassell. He'll be joined by Wizards guards Bradley Beal and Garrett Temple, as well as Wizards assistant coach Ryan Saunders and player development coach Joe Connelly. Mike Riordan, who played six years for the Wizards franchise, including its final two seasons as the the Baltimore Bullets from 1971 to 1973, and Larry Stewart, who played for Coppin State and then the Washington Bullets from 1991 to 1995, will also be present.
NEWS
May 17, 2005
SURE, THEY'VE been gone for more than three decades, but we still have a soft spot for the NBA franchise formerly known as the Baltimore Bullets. The now-Washington Wizards ended their season this past weekend, losing to the Miami Heat to conclude an 0-4 sweep. But it was an honorable effort and the pain shouldn't last. The Wizards had a turnaround year, their best in a quarter-century. The Bullets weren't much of a success when they came here from Chicago in 1963 either. But in a decade in Baltimore, a playoff-caliber team emerged with stars such as Wes Unseld, Earl "The Pearl" Monroe, Kevin Loughery, Gus Johnson and Jack Marin.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | November 25, 2009
Abe Pollin, a pioneer in area sports and the first man to move a major league sports franchise out of Baltimore in the modern era, died Tuesday. He was 85. His death was announced by his company, Washington Sports & Entertainment. No details were disclosed, but Pollin suffered from progressive supranuclear palsy, a rare brain disorder that impairs movement and balance. He had heart bypass surgery in 2005 and broke his pelvis two years later. "With Abe Pollin's passing, the NBA family has lost its most revered member, whose stewardship of the Wizards franchise, together with his wife, Irene, has been a study in unparalleled dedication to the city of Washington," NBA commissioner David Stern said.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | November 25, 2009
Abe Pollin, a pioneer in area sports and the first man to move a major league sports franchise out of Baltimore in the modern era, died Tuesday. He was 85. His death was announced by his company, Washington Sports & Entertainment. No details were disclosed, but Pollin suffered from progressive supranuclear palsy, a rare brain disorder that impairs movement and balance. He had heart bypass surgery in 2005 and broke his pelvis two years later. "With Abe Pollin's passing, the NBA family has lost its most revered member, whose stewardship of the Wizards franchise, together with his wife, Irene, has been a study in unparalleled dedication to the city of Washington," NBA commissioner David Stern said.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
Thirty years ago last month, the Baltimore Colts left town, and the loss of the beloved NFL franchise was a stunning blow not only to football fans but to the city's identify. Nine years later, Baltimore's image as a sports town suffered another big hit when, after getting passed over for an expansion franchise, then-NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue famously suggested a museum be purchased for the city instead. The beauty of that "Let them eat fossils and Pre-Columbian art" put-down was that it not only implied that an NFL team would never be coming to Baltimore but that the city had a cultural deficit, too. Whatever chip on the shoulder Baltimore had from the day of the Mayflower moving vans suddenly got a lot heavier.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Arnold A. "Arnie" Heft, a minor league Orioles pitcher during the 1930s who later was an NBA referee, co-owner of the Baltimore Bullets, noted horse owner and real estate entrepreneur, died in his sleep of unknown causes March 12 at Sunrise at Fox Hill Senior Living Facility in Bethesda. The former Chevy Chase resident was 94. "Never in the 10 years that I worked for him did I ever feel like I was working for him," said Tim Keefe, Mr. Heft's horse trainer. "He never put pressure on me, even though he loved to win. " "Arnie was a very friendly guy who was drawn to people, and they were drawn to him. He stood 5-7 and had a 10-foot-tall heart," said Richard Hoffberger, who had been president for 27 years of the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Former Baltimore Bullets coach Bob "Slick" Leonard, the winningest coach in American Basketball Association history, on Friday was named one of the first members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame's Class of 2014. Leonard, 81, was voted in by the ABA Committee, one of five direct-elect committees charged with "presenting accurate historical information while utilizing voters who are intimately familiar with the special category they have been assigned to evaluate," according to a release . Joining Leonard, now a color commentator for the Indiana Pacers, are Nat Clifton, Sarunas Marciulionis, Guy Rodgers and former NBA commissioner David Stern.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
The Washington Wizards were banking on a number of constituencies to pack Baltimore Arena for Thursday night's exhibition game against Carmelo Anthony and the New York Knicks -- and they couldn't have been disappointed. The one-time home of the former Baltimore Bullets wasn't filled to the rafters, but the game drew a large, enthusiastic crowd that included a lot of fans who showed up to watch an improved Wizards team in a very intimate setting and even more who came to cheer on  Anthony (Towson Catholic)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Half a century ago, the Baltimore Bullets came into the world without much fuss. There was no parade for the city's new National Basketball Association team. The opening night crowd fell far short of a sellout. And the Bullets bowed meekly to the world champion Boston Celtics, as they would the first nine times they played them. A storybook beginning, it wasn't. But that game - a 109-95 loss to the dynastic Celtics in the Civic Center on Oct. 16, 1963 - christened the Bullets' 10-year stay in the city that would thrill to the feats of stars to come: the acrobatic dunks of Gus Johnson, the ball-handling artistry of Earl Monroe and the rugged inside play of Wes Unseld.
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Former NBA player Sam Cassell made a visit to his old stomping grounds Thursday, conducting a basketball clinic for more than 75 students at Dunbar. "This place has done tremendous things for me," said Cassell, an alumnus who now works as an assistant coach for the Washington Wizards. "This is where my groundwork, my roots, started. " Cassell joined Wizards guards Bradley Beal and Garrett Temple to take the students through a fundamentals workshop, which included passing, shooting and dribbling drills.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
The Washington Wizards were banking on a number of constituencies to pack Baltimore Arena for Thursday night's exhibition game against Carmelo Anthony and the New York Knicks -- and they couldn't have been disappointed. The one-time home of the former Baltimore Bullets wasn't filled to the rafters, but the game drew a large, enthusiastic crowd that included a lot of fans who showed up to watch an improved Wizards team in a very intimate setting and even more who came to cheer on  Anthony (Towson Catholic)
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Former NBA player Sam Cassell made a visit to his old stomping grounds Thursday, conducting a basketball clinic for more than 75 students at Dunbar. "This place has done tremendous things for me," said Cassell, an alumnus who now works as an assistant coach for the Washington Wizards. "This is where my groundwork, my roots, started. " Cassell joined Wizards guards Bradley Beal and Garrett Temple to take the students through a fundamentals workshop, which included passing, shooting and dribbling drills.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Students at Dunbar will share the high school's basketball court with a few Washington Wizards next week when the team hosts a clinic in advance of its Oct. 17 return to Baltimore. The session at Dunbar, scheduled for Sept. 19 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., will be hosted by Baltimore native and Dunbar graduate Sam Cassell. He'll be joined by Wizards guards Bradley Beal and Garrett Temple, as well as Wizards assistant coach Ryan Saunders and player development coach Joe Connelly. Mike Riordan, who played six years for the Wizards franchise, including its final two seasons as the the Baltimore Bullets from 1971 to 1973, and Larry Stewart, who played for Coppin State and then the Washington Bullets from 1991 to 1995, will also be present.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2012
Dec. 10, 2000: A 24-3 defeat of the San Diego Chargers earns the Ravens their first NFL postseason berth. Trent Dilfer passes for two touchdowns for host Baltimore (10-4), which wins its fifth straight game and will win six more. "The playoffs are great," safety Kim Herring says, "but we want it all. " Dec. 13, 1980: A dismal shooting night dooms fourth-ranked Maryland, which falls at defending NCAA men's basketball champion Louisville, 78-67 before a national television audience.
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