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By Antero Pietila | August 15, 2001
A half-century ago, the city school system came up with an ambitious idea: Recruit a group of high school students, led by history teachers, to write a textbook about how Baltimore worked. The task was divided among 12 senior high schools. Eastern did a chapter on history, Douglass delved into the ethnic and religious diversity of the community, Southern looked at how Baltimore fit into the regional geography. Poly described governance, Forest Park investigated economic resources, Patterson described occupational patterns and living standards.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
The 2014 Baltimore Book Festival will feature a lineup that includes a National Book Award-winning author, a novelist whose previous work was made into an Academy Award-nominated film, a popular sports broadcaster and a food writer who has penned a memoir with recipes. Highlights of the 19 t h festival, which will be held from Sept. 26-28, were announced Tuesday in a news release by the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts. Featured authors and books will include: former National Book Award winner Alice McDermott reading from her most recent novel, "Someone," an elegant tone poem that traces the life of an ordinary woman; Andre Dubus III's highly praised collection of four novellas, "Dirty Love"; the father-son memoir "Forgotten Sundays" penned by WBAL-TV sports director Gerry Sandusky; and "Slices of Life," by food writer Leah Eskin, whose column runs in The Baltimore Sun's Wednesday Taste section.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 24, 2009
James McBride had no idea Maryland's Eastern Shore would be the setting for his next novel when he first headed there about seven years ago. In fact, he says, he was on his way to Washington to research a book on the death of Abraham Lincoln when he impulsively decided to turn left on U.S. 50 instead of right. "I wanted to visit the house where Lincoln died," says McBride, a Brooklyn native with homes in New York and Bucks County, Pa. "I started driving down that way, but then I just veered off at Annapolis and started heading in the other direction."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Marlo Thomas is an actress, an activist, an author and most recognizable as the face of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., founded by her father, comedian Danny Thomas. She is also the editor of a new collection of women's stories, "It Ain't Over … Reinventing Your Life and Realizing Your Dreams — Anytime, at Any Age. " Thomas, who lives in New York and Connecticut with her husband of more than 30 years, pioneering talk-show host Phil Donahue, will be at The Baltimore Sun Book Club on Wednesday to talk to readers about her new book.
NEWS
September 28, 1997
Three blocks from the Baltimore Book Festival II, the city's literary set had little to cheer about yesterday.A demolition contractor hired by the city chose yesterday to begin tearing down the historic Peabody Book Shop and Beer Stube at 913 N. Charles St., a former speakeasy and gathering place patronized by such writers as F. Scott Fitzgerald and H. L. Mencken."
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | January 13, 1992
From "The Baltimore Book":"Charles Center was concieved and built as a property development sceme of direct benefit to corporate and finance capital. The city as a whole recieved very little benefit from it."*"...a recent internal study suggested that Baltimore spends $17 million a year more on servicing the downtown and Inner Harbor than it gets back in tax revenues."*"(The Maryland Science Center) was designed in the wake of the 1968 riots , at a time when a substantial African-American population inhabited the close-by community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | October 3, 1999
How better to brighten up a party than with a guest famous for his utter lack of joy! Ah, but this was a party to thank supporters of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, on opening night of the Baltimore Book Festival. And the guest of honor? The Baltimore-connected writer Edgar Allan Poe, as portrayed by actor David Keltz."They don't make melancholics like they used to in the 19th century," sighed Dr. Sarah Begus, as she listened to Keltz recite Poe's "The Raven."Among those sharing the good cheer in the Literary Salon tent at the Mount Vernon book festival site were Carla Hayden, library director; Ronald Owens, president of Friends of the Enoch Pratt Free Library; Bob Hillman and Peggy Heller, library board trustees; Primus St. John, poet; Fred L. Miller and Sujata Massey, authors; and Charles Longo and Willis White, vice presidents of SlingShot Publishing Co.
NEWS
By Matthew Crenson | January 13, 1992
THE BALTIMORE BOOK: NEW VIEWS OF LOCAL HISTORY. Edited by Elizabeth Fee, Linda Shopes and Linda Zeidman. Temple University Press. 208 pages. $29.95. FOR AN awfully long time now, Baltimoreans have felt that they had less history than other cities. History -- really Big History -- always seemed to happen someplace else. When America's founders and framers had Big Ideas to get off their chests, they went, unaccountably, to Philadelphia.Washington had presidents. New York had Wall Street. Boston had Paul Revere, Puritans and the Adams family.
NEWS
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | October 30, 1991
Imagine a history of Baltimore with scarcely a mention of Fort McHenry, Enoch Pratt, Johns Hopkins and the Fire of 1904, but with a whole chapter on the radical seamen who worked the city's waterfront in the 1930s, and another on the canning industry in Fells Point at the turn of the century. Instead of lauding the B&O Railroad, one of the pillars of the city's and state's history, the book harshly criticizes the railroad's policies toward workers that led to the famous strike of 1877 at Camden Yards:"Safety conditions on the B&O were woefully inadequate.
NEWS
August 1, 2005
Barbara S. Elliott, former owner of a Baltimore book bindery, died of heart failure Tuesday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Oak Crest Village resident was 91. Barbara Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating from the old St. James Commercial School in East Baltimore in 1929, she went to work as a secretary at the Elliott Bookbinding Co., which had been established by her future husband in the basement of his home in 1924. In 1934, she married Charles L. Elliott Sr., who later moved the business to Rosedale Street in Walbrook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
The Baltimore Book Festival is moving a few blocks south for its fall 2014 edition, to accommodate the renovation of the Washington Monument. This year, more than 200 authors and 100 exhibitors and sellers will pitch their booths at the Inner Harbor Sept. 26-28, according to a spokeswoman for the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, which runs the festival. For the past 18 years, the festival has set up shop in Mount Vernon Square. But restoration work on the monument, which began in January, has made navigating the square a challenge even without thousands of additional visitors.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Corrections officials have given the "all clear" and say operations at Baltimore Central Booking & Intake Center have returned to normal after a bomb threat Friday morning. The Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services announced via Twitter that the situation has been resolved. The threatening phone call came from outside the building, according to Detective Brandon Echevarria, a Baltimore police spokesman.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
The Baltimore Book Festival in Mount Vernon this weekend will contribute to congestion and delays for commuters in the city this weekend, as multiple road and lane closures are and will be in effect through Monday, according to city transportation officials. The festival, which features hundreds of authors and book signings as well as more than 100 exhibitors and booksellers, runs from noon to 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and from noon to 7 p.m. on Sunday. Residents and commuters are urged to plan ahead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The Food for Thought stage at the Baltimore Book Festival will present a full slate of talks and demonstrations by Baltimore-based chefs and visiting cookbook authors. Among the locals are Johnny's barista Lindsay DiFabbio (1 p.m. Friday), caterer and former restaurateur Connie Crabtree-Burritt (noon Saturday) and Bradley Willits, executive chef at the B&O American Brasserie (noon Sunday). The most recognizable names among the visiting authors are not necessarily associated with the world of cooking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
As the author of 14 best-selling novels - with a new book coming out in March - Jane Green is one of the country's most popular chick-lit writers. And yet she has this to say about her life as an author: "Every now and then, my 13-year-old son looks at me and starts laughing - he can't reconcile that some of his teachers or the moms of his friends get excited about me or my books when I'm just his regular, old mom. " Green is known for her character-driven stories filled with emotional appeal.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | June 13, 2013
The life of an independent bookstore owner is perilous these days. Having to fend off deadly competition from giant Barnes & Noble, online merchants such as Amazon, and big box stores including Target and Walmart. Still, even with that cut-throat atmosphere, you wouldn't imagine that an indie owner could end up near the top of the Central Intelligence Agency. Until Avril D. Haines came along. Haines, the former co-owner of Adrian's Book Cafe in Baltimore's Fells Point neighborhood, has been named CIA deputy director, the number two position in the spy agency, The Baltimore Sun's John Fritze notes.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | September 26, 1993
For local rare-book people, September has been the high season. Convention Center show, Washington show, Baltimore Book Co. and Richard Opfer auctions, new catalog from Marilyn Braiterman and 19th Century Shop -- it all defies the economy.In numbers, a high point occurred during BBC's 616-lot periodic sale. "History of the Indian Tribes of North America," by Thomas McKenney and James Hall (1842), with 118 color plates, from a private Maryland collection and with a $10,000 advance estimate, went for $23,000 (to an out-of-state dealer who, it is feared, will break up the books and sell the illustrations to decorators)
NEWS
September 26, 2002
AS BALTIMORE CELEBRATES all things literary this week with the annual book festival on Mount Vernon Place, it's worth noting who won't be there. While book-lovers savor a who's who of famous names, area literacy advocates have planned a read-a-thon to raise money for training programs to reach those who cannot read well enough to appreciate the Baltimore Book Festival's eclectic charms. According to the nonprofit advocacy group Baltimore Reads, an estimated 38 percent of city adults read at a sixth-grade level or below -- more than 200,000 residents.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
Mary Morton moved away from Baltimore earlier this year but returned on Sunday for the city's annual book festival. Morton, who now lives in Hagerstown, has attended almost every Baltimore Book Festival since its inception in 1996. The festival has gotten bigger every year, she said, and more crowded. On a sunny Sunday, Morton and a friend browsed through used books in Mount Vernon and listened to presentations by authors, including broadcast journalist Amy Goodman and Baltimore-born "chick-lit" novelist Emily Giffin.
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