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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | December 6, 1992
The Baltimore Community Foundation will provide $1 million to strengthen arts and cultural programs in Greater Baltimore, it announced this week to a gathering of corporate, political, education and arts leaders.The foundation's pledge is based upon a report on the state of local arts: "Building Community: The Arts & Baltimore Together," which was written by Ernest L. Boyer, president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The report calls for a regional effort to advance arts and cultural institutions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Nine Baltimore arts groups, including the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Artscape, have received a total of nearly $2.53 million in grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. The grants, announced Wednesday, included $100,000 for the BSO, $80,000 for the BMA and $45,000 for Artscape, Baltimore's free annual arts festival, which is scheduled this year for July 18-20. "These NEA-supported projects will not only have a positive impact on local economies, but will also provide opportunities for people of all ages to participate in the arts, help our communities to become more vibrant, and support our nation's artists as they contribute to our cultural landscape," said NEA acting chairwoman Joan Shigekawa.
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SPORTS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
Patricia Modell, a successful TV and film actress in the 1950s and '60s who became a well-known philanthropist in Baltimore with her husband, former Ravens owner Arthur Modell, died Wednesday at the age of 80. Mrs. Modell was admitted two weeks ago to Gilchrist Hospice, one of several local charitable organizations she had served as a board member and donor. Though the cause of death was not immediately known, she was hospitalized several months ago with pancreatitis and her health continued to decline.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Mera Rubell - a 70-year-old formerly penniless Jewish Russian refugee turned Head Start teacher turned hotel mogul turned art collector extraordinaire - is the kind of person who just naturally acquires an entourage. For example, a recent tour of Baltimore's art scene began quietly at 8:40 a.m. with just one car and six sleepy occupants. Eight hours later, the caravan that pulled up outside the Charles Village home of paper artist Cara Ober had grown to three vehicles containing at least 14 people, including four reporters and photographers.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1996
It's one of those great ideas that seems so obvious in retrospect: a boutique where shoppers can patronize five major Baltimore arts organizations while purchasing holiday presents.Today, Arts To Go, a cooperative retail effort featuring items from the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Center Stage, Morris A. Mechanic Theatre and the Walters Art Gallery, opens at the Gallery at Harborplace.For the first time, BSO mugs, BMA memberships and Walters nightshirts are available in the same place through Dec. 31.The five performance and cultural arts groups "never worked together in a public way before," says Joan Davidson, group marketing manager for Baltimore area Rouse Company shopping centers.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
The founder of Baltimore's Artscape festival insisted yesterday that the event had no connection to City Hall during the Schaefer years although it was run by municipal employees out of city offices.Instead, Jody Albright testified in Baltimore Circuit Court, the summer festival really was run by the little-known Baltimore Arts Festival Inc., a nonprofit corporation.Mrs. Albright also said that she solicited funds for Artscape on behalf of the nonprofit corporation only."I never solicited [Artscape funds]
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | April 23, 1993
After four years of bitter legal wrangling, former Artscape officials agreed Wednesday to turn over to Baltimore some of the money raised for the arts festival when Gov. William Donald Schaefer was mayor.In settling a lawsuit filed by the city, the former Artscape officials agreed to turn over to the city 40 percent of the $666,513 that was raised for the summer event, in three annual installments of $88,868.The settlement does not say when the city will get the rest of the funds. Under the agreement, the former Artscape officials will pay their legal fees with Artscape funds.
NEWS
July 3, 1998
LOCAL ARTS supporters, as well as six arts groups and their staffs, are to be congratulated for a milestone.The last of the institutions -- the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra -- recently met the rigorous financial and other goals necessary to qualify for a grant from the Baltimore Arts Stabilization Project, a partnership between National Arts Stabilization (NAS) and a local committee of contributing corporations and foundations.The other participating arts organizations are Center Stage, the Walters Arts Gallery, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Maryland Institute College of Art and the Baltimore Opera Company.
NEWS
April 26, 1993
Artists are known for their piques, temper tantrums and jealousies. Sometimes even their mentors are infected with these characteristics. Nothing else explains the petty attempts of two of William Donald Schaefer's former City Hall aides to prevent the Schmoke administration from inheriting some $666,000 they had raised for the annual Artscape happening.Legal wrangling about this money continued for four years. And it probably would still continue, except that the city subpoenaed Governor Schaefer to testify about the collection and purpose of that money.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam | July 11, 1991
A story in some editions of The Sun yesterday incorrectly stated the amount of money Baltimore contributed to Artscape since a disputed transfer of money from a group that managed Artscape funds to a foundation in 1986. The city has contributed several hundred thousand dollars to the festival.The Sun regrets the error.More than $700,000 that had been donated to Artscape, Baltimore's summer arts festival, belongs to the city government, a court ruled yesterday, and should be returned immediately by the organization that holds it, which is controlled by close associates of Gov. William Donald Schaefer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
No matter how many good, even great, things we have going on in dear old Baltimore, there is always room for improvement or expansion -- well, always room for hoping, at least.  So, this being the start of a new year when we are all supposed to focus on fresh ideas, I thought I would offer a suggestion that might give the local arts scene a boost: A city-wide festival. It has been a little more than a decade since Baltimore witnessed a multi-genre, multi-organization festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Last weekend saw two more entries in Baltimore's 2013-14 music season, each yielding rewards. Saturday night at the Gordon Center, Concert Artists of Baltimore offered an unusual pairing -- Schubert on the first half, Rachmaninoff and Prokofiev on the second. If there was a secret to the combination, artistic director Edward Polochick didn't make it clear in his lengthy, sometimes fuzzy remarks woven throughout the evening (like most of us, he could use an editor). What mattered in the end, though, was all the stylish music-making.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
The turning point for the Wham City Comedy Tour came at a gig in Buffalo, N.Y. And, in typical Wham City fashion, it took some unexpected chaos and quick improvisation to reach it. On Monday, the tour - which consists of six comedians from the city's experimental arts collective Wham City and a director, all traveling the Northeast and Midwest in a white van for about three weeks this month - played an arts gallery/performance space called the...
NEWS
April 11, 2013
It's one of the ironies of the art world that major cultural institutions like the Baltimore Museum of Art are home to priceless collections of paintings, sculpture and other works by the world's greatest masters, yet they often struggle to come up with money to fix a leaky roof, pay the electricity bill or hire staff. We'd hesitate to guess the value of the BMA's holdings, but surely the total must reach into the hundreds of millions of dollars. Yet no museum that valued its reputation could sell off a Picasso or a Matisse every time the basement flooded or a heating and air-conditioning unit failed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
Part of the charm of Baltimore's arts scene is that someone is always hitting the "refresh" button. An art gallery or music club shuts down on one block, only to have another pop up a few streets over. Abandoned or underused venues might suddenly sprout a theater troupe one day, an artists' collective the next. A lot of the refreshing can be traced to a thriving DIY culture in town, a culture that has been responsible for some of the most intriguing new enterprises over the years and that helps give the city its reputation as a place where artists of every genre can find - or create - an outlet.
NEWS
November 24, 2012
Across the nation, consumers snapped up TVs, toys and other mass-produced goodies last week, as the holiday shopping season expanded into "Black Thursday" (aka Thanksgiving). But closer to home, authors, artists and musicians have been toiling over works that, given as gifts, are more apt to say, "Baltimore pride" than "Doorbuster special!" In the spirit of local enterprise, we've rounded up locally themed gift ideas that sample the offerings this year from Baltimore's arts and culture scene.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 29, 2003
Hit by falling art sales and a sluggish economy, a once-thriving Baltimore gallery and frame shop that made its reputation promoting local artists and cultivating new collectors for their works will close in December after nearly 16 years in business. The Gomez Gallery, 3600 Clipper Mill Road in Hampden, which during the 1990s helped establish the careers of such artists as Connie Imboden, Soledad Salame, Nancy Scheinman, Joan Erbe and Deborah Donelson, will go out of business after its final exhibition of Imboden's photographs ends Dec. 15. Walter Gomez, the Venezuela-born artist-entrepreneur who founded the gallery in 1988 with business partner Gary Knight, and who has run it as sole proprietor since 1992, said sales in recent years were down 40 percent from their high in the booming art market of the 1990s.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2000
Four mid-sized Baltimore art organizations -- Fells Point Creative Alliance, Everyman Theatre, Baltimore Choral Arts Society and Young Audiences of Maryland -- will participate in a program to teach management skills to arts executives. Run by the National Arts Stabilization, a nonprofit management group based in Baltimore, the program is designed to strengthen participants' ability to raise money, manage their finances and set long-term goals. The NAS also operates stabilization projects in Arizona, Washington state and Ohio.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brandon Weigel | September 16, 2012
If electronic musician Dan Deacon is anything, he is fiercely loyal to his adopted hometown of Baltimore. Last night's sold-out show at the Ottobar wasn't so much a coronation; that ship has long since sailed. Rather, its familiar dance party feel, high energy and many nods to Charm City made it seem more like a warm hug from an old friend. As he and his three-piece backing band worked through old staples and many of the songs from his most recent album, "America," Deacon's performance showed the dynamical qualities of his newest works and the maintained ability to create ecstatic dance parties with manic blasts of electronic noise.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
Three-year-old Elijah Thomas had just seen a face. And he couldn't have been more excited. "Look, look," Elijah implored, turning his head to his mother and pointing at a 15-foot metal face about 20 feet away, its mouth opening and closing as the youngster tugged on a metal joystick. "It closed! It closed!" Elijah's mom, Erika Taylor, laughed and smiled, delighted. "He's having a blast," she said, realizing that the toughest part of her family's visit to Artscape on Friday afternoon would be separating Elijah from the mechanical face that was fast becoming his new BFF. But that's what happens when you hand over control of a 15-foot stainless steel face to a steady stream of Artscapers.
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