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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
The optimistic incorporators and builders of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, the nation's first common carrier railroad, which was founded in Baltimore in 1827 and began building westward the next year, envisioned it would take 10 years and $10 million to reach the Ohio River at Wheeling. Instead, it took 25 years and $50 million, and when the first B&O train steamed into Wheeling on New Year's Day 1853, travel time from Baltimore had been reduced from days over rugged, primitive roads to just 16 hours.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
The optimistic incorporators and builders of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, the nation's first common carrier railroad, which was founded in Baltimore in 1827 and began building westward the next year, envisioned it would take 10 years and $10 million to reach the Ohio River at Wheeling. Instead, it took 25 years and $50 million, and when the first B&O train steamed into Wheeling on New Year's Day 1853, travel time from Baltimore had been reduced from days over rugged, primitive roads to just 16 hours.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1996
As Orioles fans walk to their ballpark seats, just below their feet flows a giant freight conveyor belt, known as the Howard Street Tunnel and all but unknown to those passing overhead on the sidewalks and asphalt.Some 30 million bricks went into this sturdy relic of railroad engineering. Excavated more than 100 years ago, the tunnel is used now by CSX Transportation, which says it is the largest subterranean conduit of rail freight along the Atlantic Coast.Most days, about 40 trains pound through this cavern, a 1.7-mile channel of Stygian darkness and dank, musty air infused with a dense humidity born of outside water seeping down the curving masonry walls.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1996
As Orioles fans walk to their ballpark seats, just below their feet flows a giant freight conveyor belt, known as the Howard Street Tunnel and all but unknown to those passing overhead on the sidewalks and asphalt.Some 30 million bricks went into this sturdy relic of railroad engineering. Excavated more than 100 years ago, the tunnel is used now by CSX Transportation, which says it is the largest subterranean conduit of rail freight along the Atlantic Coast.Most days, about 40 trains pound through this cavern, a 1.7-mile channel of Stygian darkness and dank, musty air infused with a dense humidity born of outside water seeping down the curving masonry walls.
NEWS
May 13, 2005
Regular horse-drawn service between Baltimore and the Ellicott's Mills station by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad began May 24, 1830. According to Short History of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, the 13-mile, double-track line was completed between the two terminals early in 1830. "Cars had been built and equipped with flanged wheels, horses secured," the historical pamphlet states. "The road met with instant favor. And preparations went forward with renewed energy toward extending it westward from Ellicott's Mills.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | May 21, 1995
From The Sun May 21-27, 1845* May 25: A painful accident occurred on Saturday on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, near Harper's Ferry, to Mr. William Greggs, a breaksman on the road.From The Sun May 21-27, 1895* May 23: A fashionably dressed lady without a hat chasing a flying canary bird down South Broadway yesterday at noon caused considerable amusement to people on the street.From The Sun May 21-27, 1945* May 24: Dorothy Lamour is soon to become a mother. Her husband is Major William Ross Howard 3d of Baltimore, now stationed at the Army airbase at San Bernardino, Calif.
NEWS
July 6, 2009
On July 1, 2009 DR. SELIG H. KATZ, age 86, formerly of Albany, N.Y., passed away at Edenwald in Towson, beloved husband of Sydney Katz, devoted father of Richard Katz and his wife Judith and Janet Katz, dear grandfather of Martha and Rebecca Katz, great-grandfather of Jacob Katz. Interment private. A Memorial Service will be held Sunday, August 23rd at the Towson Unitarian Universalist Church. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Gilchrist Hospice Care, 11311 McCormick Road, Suite 350, Hunt Valley, MD 21031 or Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Museum, 901 West Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD 21223
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | July 17, 1999
150 years ago in The SunJuly 18, 1849: BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD -- FURTHER CONTRACTS -- The Board of Directors of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, at their session yesterday, the Patriot says, awarded the contracts upon their second letting, embracing 25 miles of the line west of Cumberland.100 years ago in The SunJuly 21, 1899: The Board of Directors of the German Amerian Bank, 524 S. Broadway, have adopted the designs for a new bank building that were furnished by architect Charles E. Cassell.
NEWS
January 11, 1991
Ralph R. Lane, 74, a retired railroad clerk, died Sunday at Baltimore County General Hospital of complications to Parkinson's disease.Funeral services were being held today at the Fairhaven Retirement Community in Sykesville.Mr. Lane, who moved to Fairhaven from Towson about seven years ago, retired about 10 years ago after 25 years as a clerk for the Baltimore and Ohio railroad.A native of Baltimore and a graduate of City College, Mr. Lane served in the Coast Guard during World War II and was a member of the B&O Post of the American Legion.
NEWS
May 21, 1991
Francis D. Cronin, a retired news cameraman for WMAR-TV, died Saturday at Union Memorial Hospital of heart failure. He was 80 and lived on Woodbourne Avenue.Services for Mr. Cronin will be held at 11:30 a.m. tomorrow at the Mitchell-Wiedefeld funeral establishment, 6500 York Road.He retired in 1975 after filming news stories for WMAR since 1960.A former manager of movie and live theaters in Boston, he came to Baltimore in 1949 and held several jobs, including one as a draftsman for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, before joining the television station.
NEWS
October 28, 1998
A nonprofit group seeking approval to build a "shrine" to Irish-Americans and early workers on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in West Baltimore passed a key hurdle yesterday when Baltimore's Board of Municipal and Zoning Appeals granted a zoning variance for the project.The 4-0 vote means Railroad Historic District Corp. has authority to move ahead with plans to rehabilitate "alley houses" at 918 and 920 Lemmon St. for a small museum and archaeological garden that would celebrate the history of Irish immigrants who came to the United States during the Irish potato famine of 1845 to 1852 and worked for the B&O Railroad's Mount Clare shops.
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