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By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
For Native Americans, a dance can be so much more than a dance. "They can be traditional or contemporary," says Keith Colston, a cultural consultant for the Baltimore American Indian Center. Colston also teaches and choreographs dances for the Soaring Eagle Dance Troupe, which is scheduled to perform this weekend at the Baltimore American Indian Association's 25th Anniversary Pow-Wow celebration at the Baltimore Convention Center. "Traditional dances tell stories of hunts and battles of long ago," he says.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
For the audience, it's a show. But for the 100 or so Native Americans who will be performing inside a circle at this weekend's 36th annual Pow Wow , dancing is a spiritual experience, one connecting them to a culture as old as the land itself. "It is something that touches the four areas of our being," says Keith Colston, administrator for the Maryland Commission on Indian Affairs and veteran master of ceremonies for the Pow Wow. "Spiritually, mentally, physically and emotionally — what goes on in the circle touches us. " Set for Saturday and Sunday at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium, the Pow Wow is a chance for the Baltimore area's Native American population — about 4,000 as of the last census, according to Pow Wow officials — to celebrate and show off their native culture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2010
For the audience, it's a show. But for the 100 or so Native Americans who will be performing inside a circle at this weekend's 36th annual Pow Wow , dancing is a spiritual experience, one connecting them to a culture as old as the land itself. "It is something that touches the four areas of our being," says Keith Colston, administrator for the Maryland Commission on Indian Affairs and veteran master of ceremonies for the Pow Wow. "Spiritually, mentally, physically and emotionally — what goes on in the circle touches us. " Set for Saturday and Sunday at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium, the Pow Wow is a chance for the Baltimore area's Native American population — about 4,000 as of the last census, according to Pow Wow officials — to celebrate and show off their native culture.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | August 25, 2008
Two by two, they danced into a tent wearing elaborate feather headdresses, leather moccasins and bells tied to their ankles or knees. A circle of drummers played and chanted in the corner. Native Americans from Baltimore and across the country gathered in Patterson Park yesterday for the 34th Annual Powwow put on by the Baltimore American Indian Center. Participants included members of the Haliwa-Saponi tribe from North Carolina, Kiowa from Oklahoma and Lumbee from Baltimore. The three-day event, which ended yesterday, was designed to spotlight Native American culture.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1999
When thousands of Maryland residents come to Baltimore this weekend in search of authentic Native-American fry bread, tribal drumming and spiritual Indian dances, they'll get that and more. But chances are what they see will only scratch the surface of Indian culture. They'll get Native-American culture, the Cliff's Notes version. As powwows -- such as the three-day one at the Baltimore Convention Center -- mushroom from small tribal affairs into sophisticated events, they encompass dozens of tribal traditions and customs aimed at attracting ticket buyers, up to 90 percent of whom are not Indian.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | August 25, 2008
Two by two, they danced into a tent wearing elaborate feather headdresses, leather moccasins and bells tied to their ankles or knees. A circle of drummers played and chanted in the corner. Native Americans from Baltimore and across the country gathered in Patterson Park yesterday for the 34th Annual Powwow put on by the Baltimore American Indian Center. Participants included members of the Haliwa-Saponi tribe from North Carolina, Kiowa from Oklahoma and Lumbee from Baltimore. The three-day event, which ended yesterday, was designed to spotlight Native American culture.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
A caption in yesterday's editions of The Sun misidentified a leader at the Baltimore American Indian Center. His name is Keith Colston.The Sun regrets the errors.Eight months ago, morale at the Baltimore American Indian Center had hit an all-time low. The group's executive director had been fired after a handgun violation arrest. The center had been accused of mismanaging several thousand dollars.Then came Milton Hunt, an energetic entrepreneur whose no-nonsense business attitude and youthful energy have drawn comments -- some in praise, others in skepticism -- at the Fells Point center that serves the 6,000 American Indians in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
April 12, 1997
A caption in yesterday's editions of The Sun misidentified a leader at the Baltimore American Indian Center. His name is Keith Colston.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 4/12/97
NEWS
January 23, 2004
On January 15, 2004, EDITH (Emmel) HARDEN, 83, of Hanover and Shrewsbury, PA, wife of the late Fred W. Harden Jr.; father of Fred W. Harden III of La Jolla, CA. and John S. Harden of Kennewick, WA. Graveside Services will be 1:00 PM Monday at Parkwood Cemetery, 3310 Taylor Avenue, Baltimore. Memorial contributions may be made to the Baltimore American Indian Center, Attn: Jovina Chavis, P.O. Box 6095, Baltimore MD 21231 or to Animal Rescue, Inc. P.O. Box 35, Maryland Line, MD. 21105. The Geiple Funeral Home, Inc. 53 Main Street, Glen Rock, PA. (717)
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 10, 1996
The executive director of the Baltimore American Indian Center was arrested Monday on assault and handgun possession charges in connection with a dispute at a downtown bar.Herbert H. Locklear, 63, was arrested at the center at 113 S. Broadway about 6 p.m. and released that day. A court date has not been set.James A. Jones, 23, filed charges against Locklear July 2, four days after Jones was approached at a North Howard Street bar and threatened with a...
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1999
When thousands of Maryland residents come to Baltimore this weekend in search of authentic Native-American fry bread, tribal drumming and spiritual Indian dances, they'll get that and more. But chances are what they see will only scratch the surface of Indian culture. They'll get Native-American culture, the Cliff's Notes version. As powwows -- such as the three-day one at the Baltimore Convention Center -- mushroom from small tribal affairs into sophisticated events, they encompass dozens of tribal traditions and customs aimed at attracting ticket buyers, up to 90 percent of whom are not Indian.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1999
For Native Americans, a dance can be so much more than a dance. "They can be traditional or contemporary," says Keith Colston, a cultural consultant for the Baltimore American Indian Center. Colston also teaches and choreographs dances for the Soaring Eagle Dance Troupe, which is scheduled to perform this weekend at the Baltimore American Indian Association's 25th Anniversary Pow-Wow celebration at the Baltimore Convention Center. "Traditional dances tell stories of hunts and battles of long ago," he says.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
A caption in yesterday's editions of The Sun misidentified a leader at the Baltimore American Indian Center. His name is Keith Colston.The Sun regrets the errors.Eight months ago, morale at the Baltimore American Indian Center had hit an all-time low. The group's executive director had been fired after a handgun violation arrest. The center had been accused of mismanaging several thousand dollars.Then came Milton Hunt, an energetic entrepreneur whose no-nonsense business attitude and youthful energy have drawn comments -- some in praise, others in skepticism -- at the Fells Point center that serves the 6,000 American Indians in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | October 22, 1993
The Candlelight Concert Society opens its 1993-94 performing arts series for children and families this weekend with an offering of native culture that may be foreign to some.The Baltimore American Indian Center Dancers, based in Fells Point, will perform Sunday at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre.The troupe, established in 1968, is comprised of American Indian dancers, including members of the Lumbee and Saponi tribes. They are scheduled to perform three styles of American Indian dance in traditional garb in men's and women's categories: grass, traditional and fancy dancing.
NEWS
By Dahlia Naqib and Dahlia Naqib,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
The Native American "fancy dance" represents the youth and stamina of teen-age boys, which explains the dancers' showy costumes - the wing-like projections off their backs and their eye-catching Mohawks. The "warrior dance" serves as storytelling for Native American warriors, who celebrate and relate their victories to the rest of the tribe with certain movements. They make sure never to move in a circle or turn completely around because a circle represents perfection, and Native Americans must always be aware of human imperfection.
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