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NEWS
By Scott Dance, Justin Fenton and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Johns Hopkins gynecologist Dr. Nikita A. Levy wrote an apology letter to his wife before wrapping a plastic bag around his head Monday and pumping it with helium, killing himself in the basement of his Towson-area home, according to multiple sources with knowledge of the investigation. Along with the letter, he left behind multiple hard drives, computers and servers that police have seized and are scrutinizing, police said. More than 300 of Levy's current and former patients have contacted officers, fearing that they are pictured in images he is accused of secretly capturing, Baltimore police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2014
HarborView Towers, a condominium complex on the Inner Harbor, aims to become an iconic part of the Baltimore skyline now that it has revamped the beacon atop its east tower. "[It's] new and exciting, and I think people are just going to love it," said John Cochran, president of the council of unit owners at HarborView Towers. The new beacon on the building off Key Highway uses energy-efficient light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, which are not only environmentally friendly and cost-efficient, but offer the opportunity for ever-changing displays.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Tariq Abu Khdeir, the 15-year-old Baltimore native who allegedly was beaten by Israeli police in East Jerusalem this month, has returned home. Abu Khdeir, who now lives in Florida, arrived at Tampa International Airport late Wednesday to cheers from family and friends. He told reporters he felt good; the bruises on his face that led the State Department to express shock and Israeli authorities to launch an investigation had faded significantly. Abu Khdeir, who lived his first dozen years in Baltimore and still has many relatives in Maryland, called the incident "the scariest thing that has happened to me. " He told reporters he believes his story attracted attention only because he is a U.S. citizen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
"House of Cards," the Netflix drama starring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright, has been back in Maryland for several weeks, but today the production returned to The Baltimore Sun where it has filmed the last two years. The producers are again renting space from The Sun for Season 3. The production is expected to be in and out of The Sun for the next three months or so. Last year, "House of Cards" production finished in December for the February release. In Seasons 1 and 2, scenes set at the fictional Washington Herald were filmed at The Sun. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
HOUSTON -- Major League Baseball commissioner Bud Selig said before Friday's Civil Rights Game that he sees Baltimore as a leading candidate to host the 2016 All-Star Game. “Yes, they're certainly a very, very viable candidate,” Selig said before the Orioles' game against the Houston Astros. “When you think back, Camden Yards really started this whole ballpark expansion, and I believe that's one of the primary reasons for baseball attendance being at the historic high that it is today.” Selig, who is retiring at the end of this season, will select the locations for the 2016 and 2017 All-Star Games, and said he hopes to continue alternating the game's site between leagues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
If you drive downtown on the Jones Falls Expressway, you might have noticed a new billboard just south of Orleans Street featuring a blurry image of George Washington and the word “DRUNK” in big bold letters. No, it's not a leftover attack ad from the 1789 presidential campaign. It's a promotion for the second season of “Drunk History,” the off-kilter Comedy Central hit created by Lutherville native Derek Waters. Season 2 of the woozy walk through our national past starts Tuesday night at 10 and includes an episode on July 22 set in and featuring three stories from 19th-century Baltimore - one each with Edgar Allan Poe, Francis Scott Key and Abraham Lincoln.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | December 26, 2006
Released after two nights in City Jail on a contempt of court citation in 1978, a weary James Brown told reporters that he wasn't down on Baltimore. "It just seems I've been given a hard time here," he said. For the legendary singer - one of the flashiest and most dynamic performers of his time - this was an understatement. His performances were banned in the mid-1960s for inciting riots. A downtown motel named after him failed within a year. His second wife, with whom he had two daughters, hailed from Baltimore - where she also divorced him in 1983.
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | March 16, 1992
"You don't look so good," says the cop, smiling. "You look like death."Possum nods, the gaunt face bobbing. The Virus hangs on him, hangs on everything in the rented room. Three decades of firing heroin and thieving and turning over criminals to police at $50 to $100 a head, but it isn't a penitentiary or a bullet or a lethal dose that claims him."Yeah, I been sick, you know," says Possum in a mumble, his stick-leg stretched over a table. "I been sick but I'm back now."Possum, showing some life, talking about working.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
The phenomenon known as the pop-up dinner, in which nontraditional spaces are converted into short-term dining venues, has been around for a few years. But a quickly expanding company named Dinner Lab is bringing what originally was a haphazard practice to a professional scale. And Baltimore is among the newest markets for the New Orleans-based company. Dinner Lab will make its official Baltimore debut on Aug. 15. The company is now enrolling subscribers for its series of dining events, each of which showcases a single chef who creates a multicourse menu for the dinner.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Baltimore County police chased a stolen car to a suburban cul-de-sac in White Marsh early Tuesday and shot a suspect to death in the woods nearby, police said. The chaos roused neighbors in the development nestled between Interstate 95 and Philadelphia Road. Baltimore County officers were pursuing a Toyota Corolla reported stolen from Baltimore that struck a police cruiser and another car, police said. Officers were combing the streets of the development when one found 19-year-old Briatay McDuffie and, after a struggle, fatally shot him, police said.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
A local high school graduate who joined the Israel Defense Forces last year has been wounded in Gaza, his father said Monday. Jordan Low, a 19-year-old sharpshooter in Israel's Golani Brigade, was one of 15 soldiers investigating what they believed was a Hamas weapons cache in northern Gaza on Sunday when two rockets struck the building, according to Jeffrey Low of Pikesville. Jordan Low suffered injuries consistent with smoke inhalation, his father said. He was recovering Monday in the intensive care unit at Rabin Medical Center in Tel Aviv.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
An inner-city Baltimore grocery chain is closing its stores, delivering a blow to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's efforts to eliminate the city's "food deserts" and provide more residents with healthy eating options. An official of Stop Shop Save, a minority-owned business that has been a Baltimore mainstay since 1978, confirmed Tuesday that it had already closed five stores and will close the last one — on Harford Avenue in Oliver — leaving neighborhoods across the city without a convenient grocery store.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and For The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Not gonna lie, not even going to try and fib: I'm somewhat obsessed with layered drinks. There's just something magical about seeing layers of colors representing flavors in a glass, begging for the option of preservation throughout the cocktail experience - or total layer devastation with the flick of a straw. If layers are your thing, then I've discovered another option worthy of your attention at one Rivserside eatery known as Home Slyce. Bartender Ricardo Vargas is always noodling around with little cocktail creations, but finally decided to go whole hog with creating a cocktail of his own to fit his personality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
It's a Wednesday evening at the Pop Physique studio in downtown Baltimore, and a dozen women -- most clad in leggings, T-shirts and socks -- are rotating their hips while trying to hold an exercise ball between their thighs.   "Great job, guys!" says instructor Smithy Onattu, directing her students via a headset as a playlist with songs such as Lana Del Rey's "Florida Kilos" and "Tumblr Girls" by rapper G-Eazy pumps through the art-filled space. Over the course of an hour, the group will tackle a series of exercises: planks and push-ups, plies and other ballet moves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Baltimore native Joey Odoms, who returned this summer from duty in Afghanistan as a member of the Maryland Army National Guard, will be the next national anthem singer for the Ravens. He was selected from among eight finalists who sang "The Star-Spangled Banner" before a jury last week at M&T Bank Stadium. "I'm pretty excited," said Odoms, 25, a songwriter and former 911 operator who grew up in Reservoir Hill and did some acting on HBO's "The Wire. " Meg Sippey, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's artistic planning manager, was among the judges.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
The number of per-capita murders in Baltimore in 2012 ranked sixth in the country among cities with 100,000 people or more, according to data submitted by cities and released by the FBI on Monday.  After dipping below 200 homicides in 2011 for the first time since 1978 - when Baltimore had nearly 200,000 more residents than today - the homicide count jumped to 219* last year. It was still the second-lowest population-adjusted murder rate since the late 1980s, and the city ranked the same as it did the year before.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Kai Jackson, whose departure from WJZ after more than 20 years was first reported here last month, said Thursday that he will be joining Sinclair Broadcasting as its national correspondent based in Washington, D.C. "Yes, I'm going to Sinclair," Jackson said in a telephone interview. "I'm really excited. It's a company at the forefront of the industry, and I appreciate that they think I have something to offer. " Jackson said he will start his new job with the Hunt-Valley-based broadcaster Jan. 2. "Kai will be a special correspondent covering stories in the nation's capitol for all of the Sinclair news operations," Scott Livingston, VP for news at Sinclair, said in an email response to The Sun. "He will develop stories that focus on our commitment to advocacy journalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Baltimore is featured on the July 22 episode of "Drunk History" on Comedy Central, with Lutherville native Derek Waters and company re-enacting stories from the lives of  Edgar Allan Poe, Francis Scott Key and Abraham Lincoln. The episode, which includes portions filmed at Mother's Federal Hill Grille, is at its off-the-wall best in the Poe segment. Here's some of what I wrote about the episode, and an interview I did with Waters when he filmed in Baltimore. “I didn't choose Baltimore just because it's my hometown,” Waters said during an interview in January when he and his crew were here to film part of the episode in a jam-packed, loud and extra-boozy Mother's Federal Hill Grille.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Percy Smith is against Baltimore's new curfew. Like many of its critics, he's fine with keeping kids off the street late at night; he's just concerned about how it will be implemented. "I'm asking from an economic perspective," he said, "will this be Fells Point or East Baltimore?" He added later that he doesn't want a curfew "just protecting the Inner Harbor. " The Govans man and more than 100 other city residents came to Morgan State University on Monday night to learn about and voice their support of or opposition to the policy, which goes into effect Aug. 8. Residents asked pointed questions to a panel of city officials that included Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts and Councilman Brandon Scott, who sponsored the law. Some worried about how police will engage youths; others asked how parents will be held accountable for allowing their children to roam the city unsupervised.
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