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By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Planet Fitness, known for a "no judgment" atmosphere, will open its first Baltimore city facility Wednesday. The gym at 5201 Belair Road is one of 800 Planet Fitness locations nationwide -- and 25 in Maryland --  all run by franchise owners and billing themselves as low-cost health club alternatives designed to promote general fitness.  "We believe no one should ever feel Gymtimidated by Lunky behavior and that everyone should feel at ease...
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NEWS
By Mark Puente, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Usually awash with Orioles and Ravens fans, South Paca Street became a sea of scarlet and gray Saturday afternoon. Hundreds of Ohio State University fans filled Pickles Pub, Sliders Bar & Grille and The Bullpen to celebrate after the fifth-ranked Buckeyes beat the Navy Midshipmen at M&T Bank Stadium. Many of the 57,579 fans who left the stadium about 3:30 p.m. headed to bars as others tossed footballs and drank cold drinks in the parking lots. Hundreds of others streamed toward the newly opened Horseshoe Casino Baltimore.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Drug sales in broad daylight at Lexington Market. An addict telling viewers Baltimore "is where you want to be for heroin," and then, after she scores, letting the camera watch her cook and shoot up in her car on a street that appears to be in Hampden. A masked drug dealer sitting at a table full of dope, pointing his gun at the camera and saying, "Coming to you live from Baltimore. " An on-screen headline that says, "Baltimore is the heroin capital of America. " This is how Baltimore is depicted in the National Geographic Channel's "Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire," which premieres at 9 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
John Bruce Innes Jr., a former marketing executive for Genesis Health Ventures who was later a senior housing consultant, died July 22 of brain injuries suffered in a fall while he was vacationing in Greece. The Lutherville resident was 70. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Springfield, Pa., he was the son of John B. Innes Sr., a chemist, and Marion Rohrer Innes, a teacher. A 1962 graduate of Springfield High School, where he was on the school's newspaper editing staff, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at George Washington University, where he belonged to the Kappa Sigma Fraternity and was Inter-Fraternity Council president.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | February 23, 2014
With a second-place finish Saturday in the all-around at the Winter Cup Challenge, gymnast Donnell Whittenburg of Baltimore earned a spot on the United States men's senior national team. Competing inside the Riviera Hotel & Casino's Royale Pavilion in Las Vegas, Whittenburg, 19, opened his competition with a double-twisting double dismount on the still rings, one of six events in which he finished among the top 10. He finished second on rings, a meet best, scoring a 30.750. Whittenburg, an Edgewood alumnus, placed sixth in floor exercise with a 29.950, fourth in vault with a 30.050, seventh in parallel bars with a 29.100 and 10th in high bar with a 28.100.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Boo Corrigan is torn. His parents Gene and Lena were born and raised in Baltimore, and the younger Corrigan started a sports marketing company in the city. But as the athletic director for the United States Military Academy, Corrigan is understandably wary about the Army-Navy football game returning to Charm City for 2014 and 2016. "I feel most for our cadets who have to get up that morning and take an eight-hour bus ride down," Corrigan said. "They're leaving in the military term of oh-dark-thirty to get down to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
The number of per-capita murders in Baltimore in 2012 ranked sixth in the country among cities with 100,000 people or more, according to data submitted by cities and released by the FBI on Monday.  After dipping below 200 homicides in 2011 for the first time since 1978 - when Baltimore had nearly 200,000 more residents than today - the homicide count jumped to 219* last year. It was still the second-lowest population-adjusted murder rate since the late 1980s, and the city ranked the same as it did the year before.
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | March 16, 1992
"You don't look so good," says the cop, smiling. "You look like death."Possum nods, the gaunt face bobbing. The Virus hangs on him, hangs on everything in the rented room. Three decades of firing heroin and thieving and turning over criminals to police at $50 to $100 a head, but it isn't a penitentiary or a bullet or a lethal dose that claims him."Yeah, I been sick, you know," says Possum in a mumble, his stick-leg stretched over a table. "I been sick but I'm back now."Possum, showing some life, talking about working.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
Nick from Abingdon wants to talk Ravens, maybe offer a few suggestions for the Orioles. He's maneuvering through early-morning traffic, usually the wrong place and time to satisfy a sports jones. But with a flip of his cell phone, his opinions are spewed over the airwaves between gulps of coffee.For listeners of WKDB, this sort of jock chatter is music to the ears.Most recently a children's network station, 1570-AM was given a drastic makeover by Nestor Aparicio, the 30-year-old Dundalk native with the sharp tongue and grand visions.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A Baltimore Police officer who became a prosecution witness against other officers convicted of misconduct is leaving the department amid an investigation of his own conduct, his attorney confirmed. Det. Joseph Crystal, who said he found a rat on the windshield of his car in November 2012 after he cooperated with prosecutors, is resigning because he continues "to feel uncomfortable and unsafe," according to his attorney, Nick Panteleakis.  The move also comes as he is being investigated for an off-duty car accident in Baltimore County involving a take-home department vehicle.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Doing something about the imminent slaughter of the city's ash trees as a result of arrival of the emerald ash borer in Baltimore should be a rallying cry for citizens to get educated about trees ( "Enemy at the gates," Aug. 26). Through understanding comes action, and what this town needs is more TreeKeepers. Free city-wide TreeKeepers classes are offered this September and I urge everyone to become educated about ash trees, the insects that threaten them and how trees really do function as the lungs of our city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
I took a deep dive last week into Baltimore's drug scene. And when I finally came up for air, I had a newfound clarity on the city's troubled TV image and the line between responsible documentary filmmaking and exploitative reality television. Online Monday, I previewed a National Geographic Channel program that depicted Baltimore as a drug-infested wasteland of vacant rowhouses and lost lives. It's titled “Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire,”and if you missed it last week, you can see it again this week at 8 p.m. Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Paul Manna got his start booking wedding bands for $50 a week plus 15 percent to 20 percent commission. It was a way into music, which he knew he wanted, but it wasn't quite right. "My heart wasn't in booking wedding bands," said Manna, who, at 47, still remembers vividly the thrill of his first concert when he was 15 — Ted Nugent at the Civic Center in Baltimore. Since he started 24-7 Entertainment in 1997, he's been working to provide that excitement for audiences, booking about 100 shows a year in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Almost exactly two years ago this week Anthony Batts arrived in Baltimore to take over the leadership of the city's police department. Since then Baltimore has seen homicides go up, then come down again as Mr. Batts has instituted reforms, shaken up the force and reached out to local residents in an effort to build trust between his officers and the citizens they serve. It wasn't always obvious that the department was making progress on his watch, but it's a measure of his success in all those endeavors that today he enjoys the confidence of public officials who just a year ago were openly questioning whether he was up to the job. That remarkable turnaround in attitudes was reflected in the ringing endorsements Mr. Batts received this week from City Council members who appear set to unanimously approve his nomination for a new six-year contract as the city's top cop. Over the past two years Mr. Batts clearly has proven himself as a leader who can get things done, and he has vindicated the high hopes Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake held out for him when she recruited him from the West Coast where he had spent most of his 30-year career in law enforcement.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
As a taxpayer, I find laughable the comment by Rep. Elijah Cummings about not liking to gamble with his money ( "Baltimore opens shiny, new Horseshoe Casino," Aug. 26). But over the past six years, Mr. Cummings, his party and their leader, President Barack Obama, have gambled billions of our tax dollars on green energy companies that have gone bankrupt. Maybe taxpayers and voters need to remind these elected officials that it's not their money, it's our money with which they gamble.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | April 9, 2014
Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has placed its name in lights over the Inner Harbor, a mark of the Indian drug manufacturer's growing presence since the company located its U.S. headquarters in Baltimore more than a decade ago. Lupin, which today sells about 70 different generic products in the United States, started with three people in small offices at the World Trade Center in the early 2000s. It now employs more than 60 people on two floors at 111 S. Calvert Street, part of a U.S. workforce about 200-strong, said Mary Furlong, executive vice president of corporate development.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Fred Rasmussen and Linell Smith and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer Jacques Kelly and librarian Doris Carberry contributed to this article | November 20, 1994
In the early years of this century, when Cab Calloway was growing up in West Baltimore's Sugar Hill, the neighborhood his family called home was considered the political, cultural and business hub of black society.He was the son of middle-class professionals. His mother, Martha Eulalia Reed, was a Morgan State College graduate who taught school. His father, Cabell Calloway, graduated from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and worked as a lawyer.Young Cab Calloway even had his own car in high school -- a used 1923 Oldsmobile he'd bought with $275 he'd earned working -- a rarity in that era, particularly for a black man."
NEWS
August 29, 2014
I don't know about anyone else but I was heartened to see all those "1 percenters" lined up ready, willing and happy to throw away their money and pay their fair share toward further bloating Maryland's government ( "Baltimore opens shiny, new Horseshoe Casino," Aug. 26). Dave Reich, Perry Hall - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Funeral services for Sylvia "Cookie" Harris, the wife of Rep. Andy Harris, have been set for 11 a.m. Monday at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in Baltimore. William E. Lori, the archbishop of Baltimore, will celebrate the Mass. Visitation will occur Sunday from 1 p.m. until 8 p.m. with a vigil beginning at 7 p.m. at Ruck Towson Funeral Home, 1050 York Rd., Towson. The family prefers, in lieu of flowers, that donations be made in the memory of Harris to the Pregnancy Center North, 6805 York Rd., Baltimore.
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