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NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
A man was arrested late Wednesday after he struck a pedestrian, then an unmarked police car, before doubling back and crashing his vehicle at the scene of the pedestrian accident, police said. At about 10:40 p.m. Wednesday, a 45-year-old man was struck in the intersection of Bentalou St. and Lafayette Ave., Baltimore police spokesman Jeremy Silbert said. The pedestrian was taken to the hospital in critical condition, Silbert said. The driver of a silver Mercury Grand Prix fled the scene in the 900 block of Bentalou and struck an unmarked police car in the 1300 block of Bentalou, Silbert said.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
The number of per-capita murders in Baltimore in 2012 ranked sixth in the country among cities with 100,000 people or more, according to data submitted by cities and released by the FBI on Monday.  After dipping below 200 homicides in 2011 for the first time since 1978 - when Baltimore had nearly 200,000 more residents than today - the homicide count jumped to 219* last year. It was still the second-lowest population-adjusted murder rate since the late 1980s, and the city ranked the same as it did the year before.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Traffic camera giant Redflex has been lobbying the Rawlings-Blake administration and City Council to take over Baltimore's once-lucrative speed and red-light camera network - stressing that it should not be judged by an unfolding scandal in Chicago in which a former executive is charged with bribery. The Arizona-based firm ran Chicago's red-light cameras for a decade, generating $500 million in revenue, but lost the work last year amid city and federal investigations. Officials in Baltimore said Thursday that the company, which was once a finalist to run this city's system, has used the recent talks to distance itself from the Chicago indictments.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | December 26, 2006
Released after two nights in City Jail on a contempt of court citation in 1978, a weary James Brown told reporters that he wasn't down on Baltimore. "It just seems I've been given a hard time here," he said. For the legendary singer - one of the flashiest and most dynamic performers of his time - this was an understatement. His performances were banned in the mid-1960s for inciting riots. A downtown motel named after him failed within a year. His second wife, with whom he had two daughters, hailed from Baltimore - where she also divorced him in 1983.
FEATURES
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
You get a crab, and you get a crab, and you get a crab! Everybody here gets a crab!  Oprah's in town. The billionaire media magnate, whose career took off after a stint as an anchor on WJZ in Baltimore, came back to the city Wednesday for a dinner of crabs and crab cakes in a private dining area of Captain James Landing in Canton, according to the restaurant's owner Bill Tserkis. Oprah posted a picture on Instagram with her partner, Stedman Graham, smiling and holding up crabs.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
A man was found dead in the water near the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter in the city's Carroll-Camden Industrial Area Monday afternoon, police said. Police and fire department personnel pulled the body from the harbor at about 3:20 p.m. near the 300 block of Stockholm Street, police said. The man has not been identified, and the cause of his death is pending an autopsy by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. cmcampbell@baltsun.com twitter.com/cmcampbell6
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | March 16, 1992
"You don't look so good," says the cop, smiling. "You look like death."Possum nods, the gaunt face bobbing. The Virus hangs on him, hangs on everything in the rented room. Three decades of firing heroin and thieving and turning over criminals to police at $50 to $100 a head, but it isn't a penitentiary or a bullet or a lethal dose that claims him."Yeah, I been sick, you know," says Possum in a mumble, his stick-leg stretched over a table. "I been sick but I'm back now."Possum, showing some life, talking about working.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Boo Corrigan is torn. His parents Gene and Lena were born and raised in Baltimore, and the younger Corrigan started a sports marketing company in the city. But as the athletic director for the United States Military Academy, Corrigan is understandably wary about the Army-Navy football game returning to Charm City for 2014 and 2016. "I feel most for our cadets who have to get up that morning and take an eight-hour bus ride down," Corrigan said. "They're leaving in the military term of oh-dark-thirty to get down to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Fred Rasmussen and Linell Smith and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer Jacques Kelly and librarian Doris Carberry contributed to this article | November 20, 1994
In the early years of this century, when Cab Calloway was growing up in West Baltimore's Sugar Hill, the neighborhood his family called home was considered the political, cultural and business hub of black society.He was the son of middle-class professionals. His mother, Martha Eulalia Reed, was a Morgan State College graduate who taught school. His father, Cabell Calloway, graduated from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and worked as a lawyer.Young Cab Calloway even had his own car in high school -- a used 1923 Oldsmobile he'd bought with $275 he'd earned working -- a rarity in that era, particularly for a black man."
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
The long-term construction on northbound Interstate 95 in Baltimore will once again shift lane patterns this weekend, forcing ramp and exit closures in the process, according to the Maryland Transportation Administration. The current split between Caton Avenue and the Fort McHenry Tunnel of two lanes on the left and two on the right will change to three lanes on the left and one on the right sometime after 9 a.m. Sunday. Traffic in the right lane will be able to exit onto Russell Street, Interstate 395 and Key Highway.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
State Del. Pat McDonough has asked the Maryland State Prosecutor's Office to investigate whether the Baltimore County school board acted properly when it gave the superintendent an increase in his pay and benefits package of $27,000. McDonough believes Superintendent Dallas Dance's contract prohibits the board from giving the superintendent an increase in compensation that is larger than the teachers'. The board gave Dance a $5,000 raise as well as a $18,200 reimbursement for his contribution into the Maryland state retirement system and a larger payout for unused vacation days.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Carvey G. Davis Jr., a former Baltimore Transit Co. motorman who never lost his affection for streetcars and was a longtime supporter and benefactor of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of bone cancer Saturday at his Glen Burnie home. He was 90. "Some of Carvey's fondest memories were running and riding streetcars," said John O'Neill, longtime Baltimore Streetcar Museum president, who lives in Jarrettsville. "He was the ultimate rail fan and the last link for all of us to the great era of Baltimore streetcars," said Martin K. Van Horn, a Pennsylvania Railroad historian and streetcar museum member.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
A Baltimore man who led police on a car chase from Joppa to Perry Hall died late Wednesday after he was stunned with Tasers by Harford County sheriff's deputies, police said. The deputies used Tasers on 30-year-old Arvel Douglas Williams "in an effort to safely place [him] under arrest," Baltimore County Police said Thursday. Williams was in handcuffs, police said, when he "suddenly began to have a medical emergency. " Police removed the handcuffs, rendered first aid and called paramedics, they said.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 21, 2014
City officials said Thursday they are investigating a fish kill in a Northeast Baltimore creek that flows through Herring Run Park , where users of the park and streamside trail expressed dismay. "This is ridiculous," said Donald Cooper, who stopped while riding his bike to peer at the dead fish littering the stream bottom beneath the Harford Road overpass. Cooper, 52, who lives nearby, said a couple days before, he'd brought his nephew to the park to see the fish, which he said then were "swimming all over the place...Now they're all dead.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Blood smeared the white door and concrete slab outside a rowhouse where a teenager was gunned down early Thursday, the second 17-year-old killed in Baltimore in as many days. The killings of Keith Powell in Northeast Baltimore early Thursday and Adrian Gilliard in West Baltimore on Tuesday night pushed the number of youths killed this year to a dozen. The total has surpassed the count from all of last year, when 10 juveniles were killed. Baltimore police and city leaders have spent the last several months developing laws and programs — including a more restrictive curfew — aimed at protecting African-American youths from violence.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Baltimore's private dining clubs, longtime bastions of business networking and deal-making, are loosening up in an effort to attract a younger generation to keep their doors open. Dress codes are easing and lower dues are offered for young members at the Engineers Club of Baltimore in Mount Vernon and the Center Club downtown on the 16th floor of the Transamerica tower. Both have invested millions of dollars over the last five years to revamp aging facilities and maintain the appeal of exclusivity to attract those with money to spend.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | August 11, 2014
When the regular season opens next month, former Ravens linebacker Bart Scott will debut on CBS's NFL Today pregame show as a commentator and analyst. Can't wait. Scott will be provocative, funny, entertaining and knowledgeable, but there also will be times when what he says might appear irrational or as if he's "on medication. " Can't wait. Scott, affectionately known as "The Mad Backer" in Baltimore, will always give you an honest, sometimes emotional opinion, none better than his "can't wait" rant on ESPN in 2011 after his New York Jets upset the New England Patriots.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Date: June 14 Her story: Jannette Merritt, 31, grew up in Owings Mills. She is a technical accounts manager at Livefyre, a social content sharing company, in its New York City office. Her father, Otis Merritt III, a retired warden of the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, and stepmother, Clarice Paschall , live in Baltimore. Her mother, Marlene Merritt-Hall, and stepfather, Charles Hall, live in Myrtle Beach, S.C. His story: Michael Phillips, 40, grew up in Queens, N.Y. He is a network engineer for Collective, an online audience targeting company based in New York City.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Baltimore schools CEO Gregory Thornton said Wednesday that he is in the early stages of assessing where the central office can be more efficient and already cut back on two expenditures criticized during the previous administration. During a meeting with The Baltimore Sun's editorial board, Thornton said he will not employ a full-time driver, a job that has paid six-figure wages to a police sergeant for several years because of overtime. Thornton has also directed that limits be placed on how much is spent on food for professional development events and other meetings.
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