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By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Baltimore police are looking for witnesses in the beating of a wedding photographer near downtown. Eric Suydam remains at Maryland Shock Trauma after being robbed Saturday, said family friend Jim Sheckells. Suydam, 22, was working as a wedding photographer nearby, Sheckells said, when he went to his car to grab something and was beaten and robbed Police found him unconscious on the sidewalk in the area of Plowman and South Front streets at about 10 p.m. without any identification and labeled him a "John Doe. " A police report said he was bleeding from his mouth, nose and back of the head.
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck and The Schmuck Stops Here | September 30, 2014
Well, it's not like we didn't already have a national image problem. Baltimore has been mired in an ugly police brutality scandal and is widely viewed as one of the most lawless and dangerous places in America because of the real issues that plague most of the nation's urban areas and also the negative portrayals of the city in the movies and on TV. In times like these, a city turns its lonely eyes to its sports heroes, so the last thing this...
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SPORTS
Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
The relationship between Michael Oher and Sean Tuohy Jr. has - like Tuohy himself - grown dramatically in the 10 years since Oher was brought by Tuohy's family into their home in the leafy suburbs of Memphis. If those early years became the genesis of a best-selling book and a hit movie that documented Oher's transformation into a college football star at Mississippi and the No. 1 pick of the Ravens in 2009, this year takes the brothers' relationship to another place. In Baltimore, call it The Other Side.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Bawlamer, here's your chance to shine. Kinda. The fine elocutionists at gawker.com, ever on the prowl for clarion calls provocative enough to get a response from their site visitors, have announced a new contest that sounds right up Charm City's alley. They're looking for the country's ugliest accent. Prompted, they say, by a fear that American accents are flattening -- that is, that we're losing our regional dialects and beginning to sound blandly alike -- Gawker has thrown down the gauntlet.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Drug sales in broad daylight at Lexington Market. An addict telling viewers Baltimore "is where you want to be for heroin," and then, after she scores, letting the camera watch her cook and shoot up in her car on a street that appears to be in Hampden. A masked drug dealer sitting at a table full of dope, pointing his gun at the camera and saying, "Coming to you live from Baltimore. " An on-screen headline that says, "Baltimore is the heroin capital of America. " This is how Baltimore is depicted in the National Geographic Channel's "Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire," which premieres at 9 p.m. Wednesday.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Boo Corrigan is torn. His parents Gene and Lena were born and raised in Baltimore, and the younger Corrigan started a sports marketing company in the city. But as the athletic director for the United States Military Academy, Corrigan is understandably wary about the Army-Navy football game returning to Charm City for 2014 and 2016. "I feel most for our cadets who have to get up that morning and take an eight-hour bus ride down," Corrigan said. "They're leaving in the military term of oh-dark-thirty to get down to Baltimore.
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | March 16, 1992
"You don't look so good," says the cop, smiling. "You look like death."Possum nods, the gaunt face bobbing. The Virus hangs on him, hangs on everything in the rented room. Three decades of firing heroin and thieving and turning over criminals to police at $50 to $100 a head, but it isn't a penitentiary or a bullet or a lethal dose that claims him."Yeah, I been sick, you know," says Possum in a mumble, his stick-leg stretched over a table. "I been sick but I'm back now."Possum, showing some life, talking about working.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | April 9, 2014
Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has placed its name in lights over the Inner Harbor, a mark of the Indian drug manufacturer's growing presence since the company located its U.S. headquarters in Baltimore more than a decade ago. Lupin, which today sells about 70 different generic products in the United States, started with three people in small offices at the World Trade Center in the early 2000s. It now employs more than 60 people on two floors at 111 S. Calvert Street, part of a U.S. workforce about 200-strong, said Mary Furlong, executive vice president of corporate development.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
A Wednesday bankruptcy filing by Synagro Technologies Inc. means growth and new jobs for the Baltimore area as the waste recycler consolidates its headquarters in White Marsh. The Carlyle Group LP-owned company, which had been co-headquartered in Baltimore and Houston, said Wednesday that it would use bankruptcy to restructure debt and sell its assets to EQT Infrastructure in a $455 million deal. The company filed for a Chapter 11 reorganization of its debts in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware and said it expects the sale to be completed in two to three months.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
Thank you to The Sun for your hard-hitting, front page article highlighting the abuse of power by some members of the Baltimore City Police Department ("Undue force," Sept. 28). "A disturbing pattern" and "frightful human toll" are apt expressions used in the article to which we must add "unacceptable racist practices against African Americans" to seemingly describe a culture in the Baltimore City Police Department which we all know continues to this day. We citizens of Baltimore need proof that severe measures are being taken to correct Baltimore's "national reputation of not being a professional and effective department," as you state in the article.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
As a new business, "MiY Home" and "Sleep Lab Z," we are very excited for the Red Line coming two blocks from our store ( "MTA announces series of 'open houses' on Red Line," Sept. 16). We purchased two connected abandoned buildings in the back of Fells Point (Douglass Place). One factor in doing this was that Baltimore was putting in a Red Line and people could get around and visit us without getting into cars to go shop in the furniture stores outside the city. I know the Red Line is controversial, but many of my neighbors and business peers have planted down roots in homes and businesses along the stops because this project moves Baltimore closer to being a world city.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
A city police officer was charged with felony assault after he stormed into a home in full uniform Monday and threatened to kill his wife with his service weapon, Baltimore police said. After the alleged attack, Officer Gualberto Diaz, 38, reported to work and asked to be excused from the rest of his shift. After police investigated the attack, Diaz was arrested Monday and taken to Central Booking. A judge ordered him held without bail Tuesday, according to court records. In a statement, the Police Department's top disciplinarian condemned Diaz.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Dealing with police can involve a delicate balance between knowing your rights and being respectful to officers. Both are crucial, seven lawyers told a church full of Baltimore's black youths and their parents. But when in doubt, attorney Douglas B. Evans said, "you have the right to shut up. " The panel of black attorneys answered questions about police brutality and racial profiling, amid other concerns during the seminar, Conscious Operations during Police Stops, or "C.O.P.S.," at the Empowerment Temple Church on Tuesday night.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Two men were shot - one of them fatally - in Highlandtown on Tuesday just after midnight, police said. The shooting occurred in the 3700 block of E. Pratt St. at about 12:30 a.m., police said. Officers were called for a report of gunshots heard in the area and found a man who had been shot in the back. He died at a hospital. Police said a second victim was found "nearby" with non-life-threatening injuries. Police did not release the ages or identities of the victims. A motive and suspect description was not provided.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Local playwright Rosemary Frisino Toohey has taken first place for having written the best script to be performed in the recently concluded Baltimore Playwrights Festival. Toohey picked up $250 for her Holocaust-themed drama, "Under the Poplar Trees, the festival announced in a news release. Toohey previously won top honors in the 2005 and 2009 festivals. Second place, carrying a $100 award, went to Lewis Schrager's script for "Fourteen Days in July", while Joycelyn Walls won third place and $50 for "The Soulman's Soul.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
The number of per-capita murders in Baltimore in 2012 ranked sixth in the country among cities with 100,000 people or more, according to data submitted by cities and released by the FBI on Monday.  After dipping below 200 homicides in 2011 for the first time since 1978 - when Baltimore had nearly 200,000 more residents than today - the homicide count jumped to 219* last year. It was still the second-lowest population-adjusted murder rate since the late 1980s, and the city ranked the same as it did the year before.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
(UPDATE 2: Netflix exec thinks budget differences between Maryland and "House of Cards" are "over-comeable. " (UPDATE: HBO confirms "Veep" will be returning to Baltimore to film Season 4.) HBO today announced that it is renewing "Veep" for a fourth season and will return to Baltimore to produce it. The political satire starring Julia-Louis Dreyfus as Vice President Selina Meyer has filmed the last three seasons in Baltimore. "HBO has had a long history of shooting long form projects in Baltimore dating back to 'The Corner,'" a spokeswoman for the show said earlier this month when asked about a return.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
The Baltimore Sun won an Online Journalism Award Saturday for Matthew Hay Brown's 2013 article, " Breaking the Silence ," about American servicemen who were sexually assaulted while serving in the military. Women in uniform are more likely to be sexually assaulted than men. But because there are many more men than women in the military, there are more assaults against men than against women. And when the victim is a man, Brown's reporting showed, a perpetrator is far less likely to be punished.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Binnie Ritchie Holum, a dancer, choreographer, playwright and actress who had been a co-founder of the Baltimore Women's Theatre Project , died Sept. 21 at her parents' home near Saranac Lake, N.Y., of a gioblastoma, an aggressive brain tumor. She was 64. "Her talent was just endless and she had more energy than three people combined," said Harvey M. Doster, her collaborator, who is director of the International Baccalaureate Theater Program at St. Timothy's School in Stevenson.
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