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Erin Cox and Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Possession of small amounts of marijuana will no longer be a crime in Maryland under a law passed Monday and sent to Gov. Martin O'Malley for his expected signature. Adults caught with less than 10 grams of pot will get a citation that will be treated like traffic ticket and pay a fine, but they could no longer be sent to jail. O'Malley said he plans to sign the law, a reversal from views he held as he gained prominence as Baltimore's tough-on-crime mayor. "As a young prosecutor, I once thought that decriminalizing the possession of marijuana might undermine the public will necessary to combat drug violence and improve public safety," O'Malley said in a statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Don Scott announced that he's retiring from WJZ-TV July 12. "ICYMI -- I'll be retiring from WJZ/CBS after 40 years and on July 12th this year," Scott wrote on Twitter last week. "Thank you for four decades of your support @cbsbaltimore. " Jay Newman, general manager of WJZ, sent the following message to staff after Scott's announcement: As some of you already know Don Scott will be retiring later this year. I want to take this opportunity to personally thank Don for all his many, many contributions.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
Zachary Lederer, the former University of Maryland men's basketball manager whose muscle pose in a hospital bed after cancer surgery inspired patients worldwide, died Tuesday, his mother confirmed. He was 20. A candlelight vigil was held at 11 p.m. Tuesday at the Comcast Center in College Park. Lederer, of Ellicott City, was 18 in 2012 when he struck the now-famous "Zaching" pose. It went viral, inspiring friends, celebrities, politicians and entire sports teams around the world to post similar pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and By Evan Siple | April 15, 2014
Coming up on its fourth anniversary, Bluegrass Tavern has quietly been earning top marks as a carefully crafted American cuisine establishment in an area that has seen a wave of revitalization, much to the restaurant's benefit. And with a relatively wide selection of whiskeys and bourbons at the bar's disposal, it should be no surprise that the cocktail program is equally carefully crafted and heavy on the brown stuff. Bartender Jenna Kumm has put together a complex set of libations to fill the list, one in particular serving as a next-level whiskey sour: the Wake and Bake.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Do you have the charisma of Oprah, the peppiness of Katie Couric and the wit of Letterman? Ok, um.... well, do you at least have the Mr. Rogers' knack for popping in businesses with his television neighbor? The city's local access cable channel is looking for you. Channel 25 has just been rebranded as CharmTV and is working on a roster of more interesting shows with the help of nationally-recognized producers. Those producers are seeking a host for a show called "Born in Baltimore," who will walk viewers through businesses that were founded in the city.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | April 9, 2014
Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has placed its name in lights over the Inner Harbor, a mark of the Indian drug manufacturer's growing presence since the company located its U.S. headquarters in Baltimore more than a decade ago. Lupin, which today sells about 70 different generic products in the United States, started with three people in small offices at the World Trade Center in the early 2000s. It now employs more than 60 people on two floors at 111 S. Calvert Street, part of a U.S. workforce about 200-strong, said Mary Furlong, executive vice president of corporate development.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2005
The column you are reading has a new name - "Back Story" - but its roots go back almost 60 years in Sun history. The story starts in 1946, when Neil H. Swanson, executive editor of the Sunpapers, launched the sepia-toned Sunday Sun Magazine. Swanson laid down the magazine's editorial mission: "Maryland is a fascinating place to live, a place filled with interesting people and chock-full of untold stories." And the first issue, on Jan. 6, 1946, was replete with Maryland stories, photographs and advertising.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
The number of per-capita murders in Baltimore in 2012 ranked sixth in the country among cities with 100,000 people or more, according to data submitted by cities and released by the FBI on Monday.  After dipping below 200 homicides in 2011 for the first time since 1978 - when Baltimore had nearly 200,000 more residents than today - the homicide count jumped to 219* last year. It was still the second-lowest population-adjusted murder rate since the late 1980s, and the city ranked the same as it did the year before.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
A 25-year-old Baltimore man was arrested last week and charged in the rape of a 13-year-old girl that occurred earlier this month, police said. Robert Ansel Cason, who has addresses listed in the 900 block of Seagull Ave. and the 1700 block of E. 28 St., was charged with second-degree rape; second-, third- and fourth-degree sex offenses; sex abuse of a minor; and second-degree assault, police said. Officers were called to a house in the 2700 block of Claybrooke Drive on April 5 for a reported statutory rape.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | April 15, 2014
A Baltimore city police officer and Columbia resident was indicted last week on multiple sex offense charges by a Howard County Grand Jury, a county State's Attorney spokesman announced Tuesday. Charles William Hagee, 44, of the 8800 block of Goose Landing Circle, was indicted on three third-degree sex offense charges, a charge of sexual solicitation of a minor, and three counts of prostitution, according to court documents. Hagee was arrested in March by Howard County police when they received a tip regarding the prostitution of a 14-year-old girl in Columbia.  Police said detectives believe Hagee contacted the girl through a phone number posted to an online prostitution advertisement, and that the two exchanged text messages before meeting at his Columbia home and engaging in sexual activity.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
A homeless woman whose wooded campsite in Glen Burnie was swallowed by flash flooding amid heavy rain Tuesday morning was swept 3,000 feet down a creek — including through a culvert beneath Governor Ritchie Highway — before being rescued. "She was extremely, extremely lucky," said Chief Keith Swindle, an Anne Arundel County Fire Department spokesman. "She could have been trapped. There's tons of debris down there. " About 1.3 inches of rain fell at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m., and flash flooding occurred around the region, leading into snow flurries Tuesday night.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 15, 2014
The grand news that Questar Properties wants to build a landmark 43-story apartment building on the site of the old McCormick spice plant near the Inner Harbor must strike some long-timers as shocking. I'm thinking particularly of suburban cynics who seem to take twisted glee in Baltimore's flaws, starting with its reputation for violent crime. They mock and dismiss as fantastical Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's goal of adding 10,000 new families to the city by 2022. Or perhaps I assume the plan for auld McCormick's would elicit shock because of our chronically low expectations.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Raymond Ernest Callegary, an attorney who practiced in downtown Baltimore for nearly 60 years, died of a brain hemorrhage Saturday at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 88 and lived in Timonium. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Ernest Callegary, a barber born in Italy, and the former Alice DeBussieres, a homemaker. The family lived on West Lafayette Avenue, and Mr. Callegary attended St. Martin's School. During the Depression, he delivered newspapers, including the old Baltimore News-Post and a German-language paper, the Deutsche Correspondent.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
The popular Shake Shack burger chain said Tuesday it will open a Baltimore restaurant early next year. The Baltimore outpost will be located at 400 E. Pratt Street, the former Examiner newspaper building that is now home to the digital marketing firm R2integrated. Shake Shack CEO Randy Garutti highlighted the restaurant's prime Inner Harbor location in a news release. The spot will have 80 seats inside and another 30 outside, according to the company. "Baltimore is a thriving city that's steeped in American history, food and culture.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Temperatures slid sharply Tuesday afternoon after a cold front brought 2 inches of rain, and lows were expected to drop below freezing by early Wednesday and bring snow flurries west of Baltimore. Temperatures peaked at 67 degrees around midday at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, but after a front bringing some thunder and lightning and heavy rain, they fell to 52 degrees by 3 p.m. As of 3 p.m., 2 inches of rain had fallen at BWI since 8 a.m.  The record for Tuesday's date is more than 2.5 inches.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
For the first time since 2010, it appears the Blue Angels will be back in full formation above graduation ceremonies at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis this spring. They'll also show up above Baltimore next fall. The U.S. Navy announced funding on Monday for the "full" schedule of its Flight Demonstration Squadron — better known as the Blue Angels — in fiscal year 2014, after sequestration grounded the jet fighter team's operations this year. A Blue Angels spokesman confirmed Tuesday morning that the team is planning to perform at all shows listed on its current 2014 schedule.
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | March 16, 1992
"You don't look so good," says the cop, smiling. "You look like death."Possum nods, the gaunt face bobbing. The Virus hangs on him, hangs on everything in the rented room. Three decades of firing heroin and thieving and turning over criminals to police at $50 to $100 a head, but it isn't a penitentiary or a bullet or a lethal dose that claims him."Yeah, I been sick, you know," says Possum in a mumble, his stick-leg stretched over a table. "I been sick but I'm back now."Possum, showing some life, talking about working.
FEATURES
By Jada Vanderpool, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Following religious values taught as a youth can be difficult for many when entering adulthood, but Charm City Tribe, a two-year-old program in the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore, aspires to reconnect people in their 20s and 30s to Judaic practices they may have lost along the road to independence. Local families funded a three-year grant initiative to reach non-Orthodox young Jewish adults and generate positive attitudes toward Jewish culture. Director of the program Rabbi Jessy Gross organizes events to connect the community and works individually with young people to help them identify their stances on Judaism.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
George Herman Ruth Jr., the pride of Pigtown, stayed in the game too long. In his last season and playing for the Boston Braves in 1935, the legendary Babe batted .181, could barely trot around the bases and stuck around mostly because he thought he'd be offered the manager's job, which he wasn't. The greatest baseball player in history retired just two months into his worst season playing for one of the losingest teams in the modern era. The sporting world is filled with cautionary tales of athletes who retired too late or staged unsuccessful comebacks.
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