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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
I am so angry right now, I should get a two-game suspension. The National Football League and the Baltimore Ravens have sacrificed running back Ray Rice on the altar of their public image. His firing was cynical and expedient and has absolutely nothing to do with domestic abuse. As soon as video from inside the casino elevator was made public - confirming what we already knew from the police report, that Rice hit his then-fiancee hard enough to knock her unconscious - the team terminated his contract.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Baltimore County police continue to search for the second suspect in a double killing in Rosedale last month. Charles William Mitter, 39, and Tyray Avia Wise, 26, were stabbed more than 70 times in a dispute over $25,000, investigators wrote in court documents. Mitter also was shot several times. Police charged Carlos Lomax, 45, a few days after the killings. But police said Lomax, who is Mitter's stepbrother, had an accomplice. The second suspect is described only as a black man, 5-foot-7 to 5-foot-8, wearing a black jumpsuit with white socks, according to charging documents filed in District Court.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
A day after he was indicted on charges of third-degree aggravated assault for allegedly knocking his fiancée unconscious, Ravens running back Ray Rice and Janay Palmer got married. Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith said today that he visited Rice and Palmer after Friday's ceremony and they are "in a good place. " "Everyone knows that we're tight. I'm tight with Ray, I'm tight with Janay. He is like a brother to me and she's like a sister to me and my wife as well," Smith said at his charity basketball game.
NEWS
By David Carroll and Pamela Charshee | September 15, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is right. We will not succeed in growing Baltimore's future by "thinking small" but by building "projects that will sustain Baltimore well into the future" (" Moving Baltimore Forward ," Aug. 29). The mayor proposes that designing a great transit system will be one of the cornerstones of a sustainable future for the city. We agree. There is also another cornerstone critical to the vibrancy, the life and the perpetuity of Baltimore and all great cities: its cultural "bones" - the richly layered accumulation of historical experience, knowledge and creative accomplishment that together form the unique identity, the persona, of a place.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Drug sales in broad daylight at Lexington Market. An addict telling viewers Baltimore "is where you want to be for heroin," and then, after she scores, letting the camera watch her cook and shoot up in her car on a street that appears to be in Hampden. A masked drug dealer sitting at a table full of dope, pointing his gun at the camera and saying, "Coming to you live from Baltimore. " An on-screen headline that says, "Baltimore is the heroin capital of America. " This is how Baltimore is depicted in the National Geographic Channel's "Drugs, Inc.: The High Wire," which premieres at 9 p.m. Wednesday.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
Steve Bisciotti puffs on a cigar at his estate overlooking the Severn River, soaking in the memories that have grounded him on his rise to becoming the Ravens' new principal owner. The walls on "his side of the house" - his wife's half is the nonsmoking part - are lined with the faces of former Baltimore Colts such as Johnny Unitas and Raymond Berry. The snapshots were autographed at training camps in Westminster where he and his father made annual summer trips. Inside the garage of the white plantation-style mansion is his first car - a 1969 white convertible MGB that took three years of saving to buy. Its license plates bear his old nickname, "Shots."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Boo Corrigan is torn. His parents Gene and Lena were born and raised in Baltimore, and the younger Corrigan started a sports marketing company in the city. But as the athletic director for the United States Military Academy, Corrigan is understandably wary about the Army-Navy football game returning to Charm City for 2014 and 2016. "I feel most for our cadets who have to get up that morning and take an eight-hour bus ride down," Corrigan said. "They're leaving in the military term of oh-dark-thirty to get down to Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | April 9, 2014
Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has placed its name in lights over the Inner Harbor, a mark of the Indian drug manufacturer's growing presence since the company located its U.S. headquarters in Baltimore more than a decade ago. Lupin, which today sells about 70 different generic products in the United States, started with three people in small offices at the World Trade Center in the early 2000s. It now employs more than 60 people on two floors at 111 S. Calvert Street, part of a U.S. workforce about 200-strong, said Mary Furlong, executive vice president of corporate development.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris and Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Amid celebrations marking the 200th anniversary of "The Star-Spangled Banner," leaders in Maryland have hammered home a point: If it weren't for Baltimore, American history might well have turned out very differently. "For many Americans, the War of 1812 was a minor event, but not for us," Gov. Martin O'Malley said Thursday. He spoke at the March of the Defenders, which commemorated the 6-mile trek of the Maryland militia to defend the city on Sept. 14, 1814. "We call the War of 1812 the Second War of Independence, and for good reason," O'Malley said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts announced that New York-based Stephen Powers , known for his public art projects, will create a series of large-scale murals as part of a project called "Love Letter to Baltimore. " Permanent and temporary murals will appear at various locations in East Baltimore and Southwest Baltimore. The object, BOPA says, is to concentrate the murals "around high-traffic transportation corridors, visible to people on the street as well as travelers and commuters passing through Baltimore by car or train.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
About 200 Maryland Department of the Environment employees on one floor out of the four the agency occupies at its Baltimore headquarters were granted administrative leave Monday as officials dealt with an infestation problem. State officials found bed bugs in the office, located in the Montgomery Park Business Center in southwest Baltimore, in late August. The agency hired an exterminator who performed an inspection of the infested floor Monday. Other parts of the agency remain open, officials said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
A person was killed and another was injured in a shooting Monday night along U.S. 40 in Baltimore County, a police spokesman said. Lt. Rob McCullough said a police supervisor on patrol around 6 p.m. in the area of Johnnycake Road and Upper Mill Circle in Catonsville heard gunshots and saw a red van fleeing. The officer followed the van west on Route 40 toward Howard County and was able to stop the vehicle. Two suspects inside the van were arrested. The injured victim was transported to a local hospital, McCullough said.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 15, 2014
Baltimore and Annapolis are likely to suffer serious coastal flooding again before this century is over, and people and property in Ocean City and on the lower Eastern Shore face even greater risks as climate change accelerates sea level rise along Maryland's extensive shoreline, warns a new report. Drawing on new government data and projections, Climate Centra l, a nonprofit research and information group, calculates that 41,000 homes with 55,000 residents in the state are in danger under mid-range sea-level rise projections if storm-driven flooding surges five feet above the high tide line - which it did in the Baltimore area and elsewhere during Tropical Storm Isabel in 2003.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
A rusted old Chevy Impala fell victim. As did a new red Cadillac. And a block over, Thomas Saunders' gold Grand Caravan also was hit. On Monday morning, residents in one corner of West Baltimore woke up to find that someone had shot out their car windows. In the chilly air, a group of police officers looked over the damage and took reports. Neighbors, on their porches and in the street, looked on. "This used to be a really nice street," Saunders, 57, said. In all, police counted at least eight damaged cars in the 2200 blocks of N. Dukeland St. and N. Koko Lane.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
A South Baltimore man filed a lawsuit Monday against a city police officer, accusing the officer of punching him repeatedly during a June arrest — an incident that was captured on video. Kollin Truss and Officer Vincent E. Cosom argued a few moments before the arrest, but a woman with Truss had separated the pair, and Truss was apparently walking away from police when they decided to make an arrest. "This attack was completely unprovoked and served no legitimate law enforcement purpose," Truss' attorneys, Ivan J. Bates and Tony N. Garcia, wrote in a complaint filed in Baltimore Circuit Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Kai Jackson, whose departure from WJZ after more than 20 years was first reported here last month, said Thursday that he will be joining Sinclair Broadcasting as its national correspondent based in Washington, D.C. "Yes, I'm going to Sinclair," Jackson said in a telephone interview. "I'm really excited. It's a company at the forefront of the industry, and I appreciate that they think I have something to offer. " Jackson said he will start his new job with the Hunt-Valley-based broadcaster Jan. 2. "Kai will be a special correspondent covering stories in the nation's capitol for all of the Sinclair news operations," Scott Livingston, VP for news at Sinclair, said in an email response to The Sun. "He will develop stories that focus on our commitment to advocacy journalism.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
For the first time since 2010, it appears the Blue Angels will be back in full formation above graduation ceremonies at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis this spring. They'll also show up above Baltimore next fall. The U.S. Navy announced funding on Monday for the "full" schedule of its Flight Demonstration Squadron — better known as the Blue Angels — in fiscal year 2014, after sequestration grounded the jet fighter team's operations this year. A Blue Angels spokesman confirmed Tuesday morning that the team is planning to perform at all shows listed on its current 2014 schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Hilary Hahn has canceled her scheduled season-opening performance of Beethoven's Violin Concerto with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director Marin Alsop this weekend due to muscle strain. In mid-July, Hahn announced that she would cancel all engagements for six weeks due to an inflamed muscle. Her recovery is taking longer than expected; she is now set to resume concertizing in October. Playing the Beethoven concerto in Hahn's stead will be Pinchas Zukerman, his first BSO engagement in 14 years.
NEWS
By Al Cunniff | September 15, 2014
I was already a huge Beatles fan when the group performed at the Baltimore Civic Center on Sept. 13, 1964. So that's why my Catonsville friends were surprised to learn where I spent that evening: at home. Those same friends were again surprised about 10 years later when I told them how I had met Paul McCartney by accident (well, sort of). Let me connect the dots between those two stories. I became an instant fan of The Beatles after hearing their music on Baltimore WCAO-AM radio in late 1963.
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