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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 2004
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - Defense Minister Sergei B. Ivanov of Russia criticized yesterday NATO's expansion into the three Baltic states and said that citizens of the Western alliance's original member countries should be worried, too, that their tax dollars were being wasted. In a weekend visit by Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, Ivanov said he remained "reserved and negative" about the entry into NATO in March of Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, three former Soviet republics. At a meeting of NATO defense ministers in Colorado Springs, Colo.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 11, 2005
WASHINGTON - Sixty years and three months after Josef Stalin, Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt met at Yalta on the Black Sea and laid out spheres of influence for postwar Europe, President Bush managed to raise the ghost of the famous conference. In choosing to visit Latvia before celebrating in Moscow the 60th anniversary of World War II's end in Europe, the president poked his friend President Vladimir V. Putin in the eye at a time when his objective was to shore up relations.
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NEWS
By Robert O. Freedman | September 21, 2000
AS ESTONIA, LATVIA and Lithuania step up their efforts to join NATO and the European Union(EU), their conflict with Russia is intensifying. The relationship between Russia and the three Baltic states is a long and tortuous one. Czarist Russia first conquered the Baltic region in the early 18th century. Then, 20 years after World War I, when the three states got their independence, the then-Soviet Union reconquered them following the infamous Molotov-Ribbentrop pact of 1939, which divided East Europe between the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 2004
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - Defense Minister Sergei B. Ivanov of Russia criticized yesterday NATO's expansion into the three Baltic states and said that citizens of the Western alliance's original member countries should be worried, too, that their tax dollars were being wasted. In a weekend visit by Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, Ivanov said he remained "reserved and negative" about the entry into NATO in March of Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia, three former Soviet republics. At a meeting of NATO defense ministers in Colorado Springs, Colo.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 11, 2005
WASHINGTON - Sixty years and three months after Josef Stalin, Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt met at Yalta on the Black Sea and laid out spheres of influence for postwar Europe, President Bush managed to raise the ghost of the famous conference. In choosing to visit Latvia before celebrating in Moscow the 60th anniversary of World War II's end in Europe, the president poked his friend President Vladimir V. Putin in the eye at a time when his objective was to shore up relations.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The White House strongly protested yesterday the Kremlin's decision to send troops into seven rebellious republics to enforce a military draft and urged the Soviet Union to "cease attempts at intimidation."In its harshest criticism of Soviet internal policies since Lithuania touched off the secessionist movement last spring, the White House called the deployment of troops to track down draft dodgers in the Soviet republics "provocative and counterproductive."The statement by White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater expressed special alarm about the treatment of the three Baltic states -- Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia -- which have never been officially recognized by the United States as as part of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By LEONARD LATKOVSKI | January 26, 1992
This past week, 47 nations met in Washington to coordinate relief efforts for the states of the former Soviet Union. The urgency of this task has been continually reinforced by daily reports of growing hardship in all parts of the Soviet successor states. The world is reacting to the signs of extensive personal suffering -- and to the ominous indications of potential political and social instability.Yet it is surprising that the world's leaders waited so long to respond to the crisis. Even before the failure of the hard-line coup in August, there was credible evidence that this would be a dangerous winter.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | September 4, 1991
When President George Bush announced U.S. recognition of the independence of the Baltic states on Monday, it was cause for celebration.The local Lithuanian community was euphoric."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 3, 2004
VILNIUS, Lithuania - The fighter jets that landed this week at the airfield northwest of here do not pose much of a threat, but their arrival at what was once one of the Soviet Union's largest bases underlined in bold the new borders being drawn between Europe and Russia. The jets - four Belgian F-16s supported by 100 Belgian, Danish and Norwegian troops - have come to police the skies over the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, former Soviet republics that officially joined NATO on Monday, along with Bulgaria, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jules Witcover and Jack Germond and Jules Witcover,Evening Sun Staff | August 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Politicians like to talk about what they call "defining moments" -- meaning occasions in which their performance shapes public perceptions of their abilities. For President Bush, the crisis in the Soviet Union is just such a moment.The president has reached giddy heights of popular approval in the public opinion polls on the strength of his handling of foreign policy questions during his first 30 months in the White House. But the situation he confronts today is both complex and threatening enough to dwarf anything he has encountered so far.As such, it will reveal far more about Bush's skills than ever was revealed even by his aggressive display of strength in the Persian Gulf or, on the other side of the ledger, his willingness to kowtow to the Chinese after Tiananmen Square and his original inability to grasp the dimensions of the changes in Eastern Europe two summers ago.Bush's policy toward the Soviet Union, one shared by other western leaders, had been based on two premises.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 3, 2004
VILNIUS, Lithuania - The fighter jets that landed this week at the airfield northwest of here do not pose much of a threat, but their arrival at what was once one of the Soviet Union's largest bases underlined in bold the new borders being drawn between Europe and Russia. The jets - four Belgian F-16s supported by 100 Belgian, Danish and Norwegian troops - have come to police the skies over the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, former Soviet republics that officially joined NATO on Monday, along with Bulgaria, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia.
NEWS
By Robert O. Freedman | September 21, 2000
AS ESTONIA, LATVIA and Lithuania step up their efforts to join NATO and the European Union(EU), their conflict with Russia is intensifying. The relationship between Russia and the three Baltic states is a long and tortuous one. Czarist Russia first conquered the Baltic region in the early 18th century. Then, 20 years after World War I, when the three states got their independence, the then-Soviet Union reconquered them following the infamous Molotov-Ribbentrop pact of 1939, which divided East Europe between the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | December 19, 1994
Riga, Latvia.-- There is an external problem and an internal one in Latvia. The first is proximity to Russia, with a feeble history of independence from Russia. The second is Latvia's minority Russian population, which native Latvians are reluctant to assimilate and whose political interests are supported by Moscow.The Latvians resist the minority because of their justified grievances against Russia, which invaded and annexed Latvia in 1940 as a consequence of the 1939 Ribbentrop-Molotov agreement.
NEWS
July 19, 1994
Four R'sI read that the state has come up with a way to save Patterson High School by dividing it into four academies: humanities, fine arts, technical education and career preparation.This sounds vaguely familiar to me. From 1927 to 1931 I was a student at Forest Park High School, the first coeducational high school in Baltimore City.Students there were offered four courses: general, academic, technical and commercial.It boggles my mind that it has taken all these years of trial and error for the school system to realize that what we were offered 63 years ago was a system that really works.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- "Diplomacy is not that different from public relations," Latvia's ambassador to the United States observes with a smile, "except you get more respect."He should know. Ten years ago, Ojars Kalnins was a budding Chicago adman, pushing auto parts and industrial sump pumps. Tomorrow, he'll be among the dignitaries welcoming President Clinton to Riga, Latvia's capital, as Mr. Clinton becomes the first American president to visit the Baltic states.Ambassador Kalnins' overnight transformation from American PR man to foreign diplomat is a reflection of the enormous changes taking place in the republics of Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia, which broke away from the disintegrating Soviet Union and declared their independence in 1991.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | September 3, 1993
VILNIUS, Lithuania -- Pope John Paul II takes his first step on former Soviet soil here tomorrow, with a long-awaited visit that finally will consecrate the cultural and political independence of this tiny Baltic nation.The pope's trip is not simply a religious milestone for Lithuanians, for whom the church was a rallying point of national identity and opposition to communist rule."The Catholic church was the main power trying to fight for human souls in every possible way," said Vytautas Landsbergis, the musician who led the independence movement here and became free Lithuania's first leader.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | December 19, 1994
Riga, Latvia.-- There is an external problem and an internal one in Latvia. The first is proximity to Russia, with a feeble history of independence from Russia. The second is Latvia's minority Russian population, which native Latvians are reluctant to assimilate and whose political interests are supported by Moscow.The Latvians resist the minority because of their justified grievances against Russia, which invaded and annexed Latvia in 1940 as a consequence of the 1939 Ribbentrop-Molotov agreement.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- "Diplomacy is not that different from public relations," Latvia's ambassador to the United States observes with a smile, "except you get more respect."He should know. Ten years ago, Ojars Kalnins was a budding Chicago adman, pushing auto parts and industrial sump pumps. Tomorrow, he'll be among the dignitaries welcoming President Clinton to Riga, Latvia's capital, as Mr. Clinton becomes the first American president to visit the Baltic states.Ambassador Kalnins' overnight transformation from American PR man to foreign diplomat is a reflection of the enormous changes taking place in the republics of Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia, which broke away from the disintegrating Soviet Union and declared their independence in 1991.
NEWS
By LEONARD LATKOVSKI | January 26, 1992
This past week, 47 nations met in Washington to coordinate relief efforts for the states of the former Soviet Union. The urgency of this task has been continually reinforced by daily reports of growing hardship in all parts of the Soviet successor states. The world is reacting to the signs of extensive personal suffering -- and to the ominous indications of potential political and social instability.Yet it is surprising that the world's leaders waited so long to respond to the crisis. Even before the failure of the hard-line coup in August, there was credible evidence that this would be a dangerous winter.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 7, 1991
MOSCOW -- A half-century of often brutal rule from Moscow came to an end yesterday when what remains of the Soviet Union followed the example of some 50 other countries and officially recognized the independence of the three Baltic republics.The just-created State Council took only 30 minutes of its first meeting in the Kremlin to acknowledge the restored statehood of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, the latest fruit of the accelerated political change following last month's failed Soviet coup.
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