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By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Staff Writer | June 18, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Was President Bush trying to give Boris Yeltsin an environmental lesson yesterday or was he simply taking him for a ride?Mr. Bush wasn't saying, as he provided the Russian president with a personal tour of the federally subsidized Chesapeake Bay cleanup one day after Mr. Yeltsin asked for U.S. help to clean up the Baltic Sea.After an hourlong cruise, Mr. Bush told reporters only that he and his Russian guest had talked "about worldwide problems"...
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | June 9, 2007
MAMONOVO, Russia -- The wooden board outside the local government building in this town of 7,000 near the Baltic Sea - a place small enough that word travels fast and no one's business is exactly private - might just as well advertise a community festival or a schedule for trash collection. In fact, it is a pillar of shame. Posted on the yellow and green board recently were the names of 50 residents who had not paid their utility bills, some for years; nine residents with other debts; and a local fish cannery that allegedly dumped untreated wastewater into the environment.
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NEWS
November 10, 2005
Apparently, Baltimore needs a brand. It might hurt. The people in charge of promoting conventions and tourism here looked around and said to themselves, "We have to brand this place. We have to wrestle it to the ground and stick it with a hot iron." They're going to spend $500,000 of the city's money doing it. But neither the hot iron nor the dollars will be what hurts. All the inevitable jokes - that's where the pain will come in. Baltimore: Etc., etc. Ha, ha. Who can resist? Actually, Baltimore already has a brand - or, to be precise, Baltimore already is a brand.
NEWS
November 10, 2005
Apparently, Baltimore needs a brand. It might hurt. The people in charge of promoting conventions and tourism here looked around and said to themselves, "We have to brand this place. We have to wrestle it to the ground and stick it with a hot iron." They're going to spend $500,000 of the city's money doing it. But neither the hot iron nor the dollars will be what hurts. All the inevitable jokes - that's where the pain will come in. Baltimore: Etc., etc. Ha, ha. Who can resist? Actually, Baltimore already has a brand - or, to be precise, Baltimore already is a brand.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Staff Writer | June 18, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Was President Bush trying to give Boris Yeltsin an environmental lesson yesterday or was he simply taking him for a ride?Mr. Bush wasn't saying, as he provided the Russian president with a personal tour of the federally subsidized Chesapeake Bay cleanup one day after Mr. Yeltsin asked for U.S. help to clean up the Baltic Sea.After an hourlong cruise, Mr. Bush told reporters only that he and his Russian guest had talked "about worldwide problems"...
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | June 9, 2007
MAMONOVO, Russia -- The wooden board outside the local government building in this town of 7,000 near the Baltic Sea - a place small enough that word travels fast and no one's business is exactly private - might just as well advertise a community festival or a schedule for trash collection. In fact, it is a pillar of shame. Posted on the yellow and green board recently were the names of 50 residents who had not paid their utility bills, some for years; nine residents with other debts; and a local fish cannery that allegedly dumped untreated wastewater into the environment.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 30, 1994
TALLINN, Estonia -- The sinking of the ferry Estonia has been a doubly traumatic catastrophe for this little country struggling to emerge from the shadow of its Soviet past.Estonians yesterday felt not just grief for the hundreds who had been lost at sea when the ferry sank in the Baltic, but an acutely burning dismay, a sense that Estonia's ambitions to be accepted among Western, progressive nations had been critically hobbled the maritime disaster."The boat was called the Estonia, first of all. It was the flagship," said Tiia Raudma, who works in the Education Ministry.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 28, 1997
KALININGRAD, Russia -- Whether it's frank sex talk, crooners or sarcastic news broadcasts, what's wafting onto the Baltic airwaves from the radio transmitter in a broom closet here doesn't sound very Russian.That's the intention, too. Radio BAS -- Baltic Audio Service, FM 100.8, the voice of Kaliningrad -- pointedly doesn't want to be Russian, at least not the old Russian stereotype of moldy conservatism and inward focus that the station loves to pillory."We are not Russia. We are not the West.
NEWS
March 26, 1997
The University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and colleges in Sweden and Norway are creating a trans-Atlantic virtual university to study marine life.Maryland students and those at the University of Bergen in Norway and the University of Goteberg in Sweden will be linked through the Internet and by real-time video teleconferencing. Members of the faculties will research environmental problems in the Chesapeake Bay and the Baltic Sea.The program eventually will offer graduate degrees.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2003
The 2005-06 Volvo Ocean Race finally has an anchor. Organizers of the regatta announced yesterday at a news conference in Madrid, Spain, that the fleet will begin its 31,000-mile circumnavigation in Vigo, Spain, an Atlantic port city just north of Portugal. The race will start on Nov. 12. It will make a 23-day stop in the ports of Baltimore and Annapolis in April 2006 before pushing across the Atlantic for the finish line at a yet-to-be named Baltic Sea port in early June. This is the first time since the event, founded in 1973 as the Whitbread Round the World, will be starting outside Great Britain.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 28, 1997
KALININGRAD, Russia -- Whether it's frank sex talk, crooners or sarcastic news broadcasts, what's wafting onto the Baltic airwaves from the radio transmitter in a broom closet here doesn't sound very Russian.That's the intention, too. Radio BAS -- Baltic Audio Service, FM 100.8, the voice of Kaliningrad -- pointedly doesn't want to be Russian, at least not the old Russian stereotype of moldy conservatism and inward focus that the station loves to pillory."We are not Russia. We are not the West.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 30, 1994
TALLINN, Estonia -- The sinking of the ferry Estonia has been a doubly traumatic catastrophe for this little country struggling to emerge from the shadow of its Soviet past.Estonians yesterday felt not just grief for the hundreds who had been lost at sea when the ferry sank in the Baltic, but an acutely burning dismay, a sense that Estonia's ambitions to be accepted among Western, progressive nations had been critically hobbled the maritime disaster."The boat was called the Estonia, first of all. It was the flagship," said Tiia Raudma, who works in the Education Ministry.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Staff Writer | June 18, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Was President Bush trying to give Boris Yeltsin an environmental lesson yesterday or was he simply taking him for a ride?Mr. Bush wasn't saying, as he provided the Russian president with a personal tour of the federally subsidized Chesapeake Bay cleanup one day after Mr. Yeltsin asked for U.S. help to clean up the Baltic Sea.After an hourlong cruise, Mr. Bush told reporters only that he and his Russian guest had talked "about worldwide problems"...
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Staff Writer | June 18, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Was President Bush trying to give Boris Yeltsin an environmental lesson yesterday or was he simply taking him for a ride?Mr. Bush wasn't saying, as he provided the Russian president with a personal tour of the federally subsidized Chesapeake Bay cleanup one day after Mr. Yeltsin asked for U.S. help to clean up the Baltic Sea.After an hourlong cruise, Mr. Bush told reporters only that he and his Russian guest had talked "about worldwide problems"...
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 22, 1995
More than a year after the ferry Estonia went down in the Baltic Sea, killing 852 people, northern European countries are moving toward adopting more stringent rules on ferry safety.Johan Franson, the head of Sweden's maritime agency, said recently that his country would require that ferries like the Estonia be able to remain stable even if their vehicle decks take on as much as 19 inches of water. Currently, just a few inches of water sloshing around can be enough to make a ferry list irretrievably.
NEWS
July 14, 2007
Laimons Eglitis, a retired art professor at what is now the Catonsville campus of the Community College of Baltimore County, died of cancer Sunday at his home. He was 77. Born in Latvia near the Baltic Sea, he was educated in Europe and at Temple University and the Tyler School of Art, both in Philadelphia, where he was a student in the 1960s. After moving to Catonsville in 1971, where he also lived at his death, Mr. Eglitis taught painting and fine arts courses at the community college and the Maryland Institute College of Art before retiring about 15 years ago. Family members said Mr. Eglitis often painted female subjects.
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