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SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1996
FORT WASHINGTON -- The owners of the state's two harness racetracks rejected a proposed bailout last night from casino operator Bally Entertainment Co., but voted to keep talking to the company to try to strike a better deal.The stockholders of Cloverleaf Enterprises Inc., the owner of Rosecroft and Ocean Downs racetracks, dismissed the unanimous advice of the board of directors and voted 23-5 against the proposed settlement.Cloverleaf is a unit of the Cloverleaf Standardbred Owners Association, which represents harness horse owners and trainers in the Mid-Atlantic.
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NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Michael Dresser contributed to this article | October 25, 1996
A major casino operator hoping gambling is expanded in Maryland is negotiating a deal that would give it control of two strategically located harness tracks -- and a head start on competitors -- should the state ever legalize slot machines at racetracks.If the deal is approved, Bally Entertainment Inc. would buy the money-losing Ocean Downs near Ocean City, and probably would shut down live racing and run it as a training center. It would also have the option of purchasing a controlling share of Rosecroft Raceway in Prince George's County if electronic wagering materializes.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | August 29, 1995
Bally Entertainment Corp. yesterday announced the appointment of Dennis O. Dowd as the new president of Rosecroft Raceway and Delmarva Downs, effective Sept. 11.Dowd, 47, has an extensive background in harness and thoroughbred racing in New Jersey and is leaving the presidency of Freehold Raceway for his new position.During his tenure at Freehold, attendance and handle improved annually with his innovations regarding simulcasting, off-track betting growth and service to fans receiving much of the credit.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1995
When the Maryland Million celebrates its 10th anniversary on Oct. 14, thoroughbred horsemen will be running for the first time for purse money sponsored by a casino company.Richard Wilcke, executive director of Maryland Million, Ltd., said the organization has reached a tentative agreement with Bally Entertainment Corp. that will add the gaming firm to the Million's list of race sponsors.It's likely, he said, that Bally will sponsor two of the 11 races -- the Maryland Million Turf and one of two starter handicaps.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1995
On the seventh floor of Towson's Hampton Plaza office tower, two clangs rang out from a stainless-steel bell, the same kind restaurant customers hit to call the cashier to the register to take their lunch money."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
Don't expect a chink to develop in the armor of the state's thoroughbred and harness racing industries as they present a unified front against the possible infringement of casino gaming on their gambling turf.By lending nearly $11 million to harness horsemen to buy Rosecroft and Delmarva raceways, Bally Entertainment Corp., one of the country's largest casino operators, virtually owns Maryland's two harness racing tracks.Initially, thoroughbred horsemen and track management regarded Bally as an evil interloper that could split its coalition with the harness side of the industry in an effort to keep out casinos.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | June 30, 1995
Cloverleaf Enterprises, Inc., a corporation formed by an organization of approximately 1,400 owners and trainers of harness horses in Maryland, Delaware and Virginia, officially took over ownership yesterday of Maryland's two trotting tracks -- Rosecroft and Delmarva raceways -- with a major assist from Bally's Casino Holdings, Inc., one of the country's primary casino gambling firms.Under what is considered an unusual agreement, Bally is lending the horsemen $10.6 million to buy the tracks and is being given free rein by Cloverleaf to run them.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1995
Maryland Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. said yesterday he opposes opening casinos at the state's two harness racing tracks.The comments by Mr. Miller, one of the state's most powerful legislators, are the first sign of political opposition to a proposal by Bally Entertainment Corp. to build casinos at Delmarva and Rosecroft Raceways.Mr. Miller said he opposes a casino at Delmarva Downs, in Berlin in Worcester County, because politicians in nearby Ocean City have long been against such an operation.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1995
How do you tell an owner that he lost a race because his horse stepped on a goose?That's the unlikely scenario that occurred at Laurel Park yesterday when Lizzie of Live Oak, nearing contention about halfway through the $20,500 feature, ran into a flock of geese that had wandered onto the track's turf course.These are not the graceful flamingos of Hialeah Park, but a band of fat Canada geese that normally hang near the infield pond and are usually content to stay there.But yesterday, hidden from the stewards' view by an infield willow tree, about a dozen of them had strolled onto the course near the five-eighths pole.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1995
WMS Industries to acquire BallyIn a development that disappointed investors, WMS Industries Inc. said yesterday that it had reached a definitive agreement to acquire Bally Gaming International in a stock swap valued at about $116 million. The price is not only lower than the original bid by WMS, but it is also well below an offer made earlier this week by Alliance Gaming Corp.Under the terms of the revised offer by Chicago-based WMS, Bally shareholders will receive 0.55 share of WMS for each share of Las Vegas-based Bally.
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