Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBallot Questions
IN THE NEWS

Ballot Questions

NEWS
August 22, 2012
The ballot questions were released Monday for all of Maryland to preview before the election. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller managed to find a way to get his precious casino where no one else wants one. He knows most of Maryland wants casino style games and very few want the 6th casino. Question 7 lumps both the new casino and casino style games all in to one. Our "lawmakers" continue to maintain dishonesty and further cement our trust in them - or lack thereof - by leading us to believe this would be treated as two separate issues.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2012
Maryland enters uncharted political territory this fall as voters for the first time in decades face four major ballot questions. An onslaught of costly advertising is likely as competing interests from all over the country try to sway the state's electorate. Ballot questions aren't subject to fundraising limits, so the money spent on at least two of the campaigns — on laws legalizing same-sex marriage and expanding gambling in the state — will likely be in the millions. Two other questions, on access to higher education for some illegal immigrants and the fairness of the new congressional map, ignite deep passions likely to inspire old fashioned face-to-face politicking.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Spurred by the conviction of a former councilman and the indictment of County Executive John R. Leopold, Anne Arundel County lawmakers unanimously pushed forward new rules Monday to oust elected officials convicted of crimes. Voters will decide in November whether to approve rules that require a vote of five council members to remove another politician from office and strip that politician of pension benefits. While one provision sets up a process to remove councilmen, the other tweaks an existing process to remove a county executive.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
City Councilman Carl Stokes says he may go straight to voters this fall to approve cutting the city's property tax rate in half by 2017 — a proposal he said would be paid for, in part, by raising a cap that limits the assessed value that can be taxed. His tax proposal faces strong opposition from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who says it's unrealistic and would wreck the city's finances. She has a more modest plan to cut the rate on owner-occupied homes by 9 percent over eight years.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2010
The new Baltimore County Council appears ready to carry out the will of voters, who gave strong support Tuesday to a ballot question giving the council authority to expand labor bargaining rights for more government employees. Four of seven members of the council that will take office Dec. 6 said they would support a bill to amend the county charter to allow a neutral third party to settle contract disputes with a large group of unionized county workers in a practice called binding arbitration.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
A ballot question to convene a convention to revise the state's constitution was supported by 55 percent of those who voted on the referendum, but the measure appears to have failed because too many voters abstained. For a convention to be called, the number of people voting "yes" would need to be more than 50 percent of the total number of Marylanders who voted overall. Although 55 percent, or about 845,021 voters, were in favor of calling a convention, outnumbering the 703,426 who opposed, 191,548 voters did not vote on the question, essentially voting down the measure, according to preliminary figures from the Maryland State Board of Elections on Thursday.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2010
As they cast ballots for governor, senator and other offices on Tuesday, Baltimore voters will also decide whether to allow city officials to make more purchases with less oversight. The measure, which proponents say will increase efficiency, is one of three proposed changes to the city charter that will appear on Tuesday's ballot. Voters will also determine whether to create a fund for sustainability projects and whether to grant city officials wider latitude in how they spend surplus funds.
NEWS
November 3, 2008
As much attention has been given the historic presidential race and, locally, statewide questions on early voting and slot machines, Marylanders will discover tomorrow that their ballots include a number of items that have attracted considerably less attention, from appellate court appointees to local bond issues that require voter approval. Baltimore County's ballot issues are typical of these choices. All but one are routine matters of borrowing money to finance parks, storm drainage, street repair, community college construction and rural land preservation, and voters should approve them.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | November 3, 2008
Casting a ballot for the next president may be what draws a record number of Marylanders to the polls tomorrow, but Baltimore voters will also decide on borrowing $125 million for projects that officials call an investment in the city's future. Expected long lines at polling stations could be exacerbated as city voters review page after page of ballot questions - 15 in all for loan authorizations. The largest is $43 million for school construction. Other projects include the Maryland Zoo, the Walters Art Museum, the Lyric Opera House, an expansion of Patterson Park and renovation projects at the downtown courthouses and several firehouses.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | August 28, 2008
Slots opponents proposed alternative language yesterday for a voter referendum on November's ballot that would legalize slot machine casinos across the state. Scott Arceneaux of Marylanders United to Stop Slots, a ballot committee, submitted the alternative wording in a letter to the State Board of Elections and asked that he be allowed to speak at a board meeting scheduled for today. Arceneaux wants the ballot question to specify that slots revenues would go to "public education, the horse racing industry and lottery operations," as well as to casino operators.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.