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NEWS
September 11, 2012
Supporters say the measure will professionalize the so-called “Orphan's Court” which oversees estate disputes.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
After the sound drubbing Maryland Republicans received at the ballot box this month, a faction in the state GOP is calling for the resignation of state party Chairman Alex Mooney. The effort follows a race in which the state party not only saw most of its candidates go down to lopsided defeats but one in which the ballot questions most Republicans opposed were all approved. Whether Mooney can be forced out in the middle of his four-year term is doubtful, but GOP activists on both sides agree that unhappiness with his performance is likely to lead to a contentious Republican state convention Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 in Howard County.
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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | October 25, 2012
The group that petitioned three General Assembly laws to the November ballot is planning a fundraiser and rally in Anne Arundel County Monday -- their first major event in the heated campaign. Neil Parrott, the founder of MDPetitions.com, said his goal is to "get the right information out" so Marylanders are able to pick through the crowded ballot and "vote the way they really want" on the questions. Parrott's group petitioned to referendum a law that allows illegal immigrants more access to higher education and the state's congressional map and helped put the same-sex marriage law to voters.
NEWS
November 14, 2012
Gerrymandering is never going to change - unless we fix this states' problems from the ground up. The recent gerrymandering of congressional districts made me come to the realization that the only way Marylanders voices will be heard is if we force our elected officials to step out of the redistricting process. My thought is that two non-partisan firms compete for drawing the maps based on actual census data collected. The second firm comes in to audit the work of the first. They are both paid, but the incentive is a bonus to the first if it draws the map correctly.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
One of the biggest winners in Maryland Tuesday night was not technically on the ballot: the Democratic leadership in Annapolis. All four of the controversial ballot questions were about measures championed by Gov. Martin O'Malley and approved by the General Assembly, where Democrats hold the majority. And all four were affirmed by the voters. Those measures expand gambling, legalize same-sex marriage, allow in-state tuition for some illegal immigrants and create new congressional district boundaries.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
After months of being bombarded by slick advertising, celebrity endorsements and candidate pleas, Maryland voters will go to the polls today - in large numbers, according to one estimate - to have the final word. At stake is the outcome of the highly charged presidential race, which could have an impact on the state's economy for years to come, along with ballot questions that have put Maryland at the center of broader debates over gay marriage and immigration. What voters here decide will have unusual significance for a state often overlooked in national politics, experts said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2012
Maryland enters uncharted political territory this fall as voters for the first time in decades face four major ballot questions. An onslaught of costly advertising is likely as competing interests from all over the country try to sway the state's electorate. Ballot questions aren't subject to fundraising limits, so the money spent on at least two of the campaigns — on laws legalizing same-sex marriage and expanding gambling in the state — will likely be in the millions. Two other questions, on access to higher education for some illegal immigrants and the fairness of the new congressional map, ignite deep passions likely to inspire old fashioned face-to-face politicking.
NEWS
November 3, 1992
Residents of Baltimore City, Baltimore County and Harford County will see the following ballot questions when they enter voting booths today.* The eight city ballot questions are Question A, $12 million for community development; Question B, $1.5 million to improve community buildings; Question C, $12.5 million for economic development projects; Question D, $1.5 million for asbestos removal at city-owned properties; Question E, $3.5 million for renovation at...
NEWS
November 2, 1992
Anne Arundel voters will be deciding 13 local ballot questions tomorrow. Some are confusing, but voters should resist the urge to skip them. They involve important issues, from property taxes to labor disputes. Here are our recommendations:* Vote FOR Question A. It would resolve the conflict that will arise if both term limit initiatives, Questions B and C, are approved. Question A says the amendment receiving the most votes takes effect. Without it, a court would decide the outcome.* Vote AGAINST Questions B and C, which would limit County Council members to two or three four-year terms, respectively.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Several voters have complained that Republican Anne Arundel County Councilman John Grasso bullied and berated them as they waited in line to cast a ballot, according to the county elections board. In one case, a voter said Grasso yelled at him and jabbed a finger into his face while his children stood nearby. The voter said he'd cracked a joke about reaching the electioneering boundary where Grasso could no longer talk to him. "Mr. Grasso then acted in a very unprofessional and degrading manner and began to resort to childish and loud name calling as he verbally accosted me," Lorne M. Young of Glen Burnie wrote in an email to election officials obtained by The Baltimore Sun. Grasso acknowledged that he had been in confrontations while talking with voters, but he said the actions described by Young were in response to rude behavior.
NEWS
November 12, 2012
There was a strong case to be made against Question 7, Maryland's referendum on expanded gambling, and we made it. Although it may make sense for Maryland to adopt table games, and eventually even to allow a sixth casino in Prince George's County, the proposal before voters was a bad deal. It gave too much away to the casino owners and offered too little benefit to taxpayers. There was a cynical, self-serving and disingenuous case to be made against Question 7, too, and Penn National Gaming made it. The massive casino corporation spent well more than $40 million on television ads, direct mail and other campaigning to sow doubts - many of them illegitimate - in voters' minds about Question 7. Penn did it not because it had Maryland's best interests at heart but because it was trying to protect its marquee property, Hollywood Casino at Charles Town, W.Va.
NEWS
November 12, 2012
Last week was a very good one for Maryland's governor. He helped President Barack Obama win another term, increased the number of Democrats representing his state in Congress while also getting all his party's incumbents re-elected and went 7-for-7 on ballot questions, including the history-making same-sex marriage law. So perhaps he was feeling his oats. At least that would explain why Gov. Martin O'Malley so rashly told reporters - practically before the unplugged voting machines had gone cold - that he'd like the General Assembly to consider making it more difficult for a Maryland law to be petitioned to referendum.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Anne Arundel voters passed all 15 county charter amendments on Tuesday's ballot, most by a landslide. Among the changes are new rules for removing elected officials from office and a slight shift in the balance of power between the county executive and the County Council. Compared with state ballot questions that drew record ad spending and addressed the controversial issues of gay marriage, gambling and immigration, Anne Arundel's bevy of local questions seemed to be overlooked, Council Chairman Derek Fink said.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
It has become obvious that early voting has become a hit in Maryland. Over 430,000 residents - 11.7 percent of eligible voters - chose to exercise their right to participate is this very important component of the American election process ("Voting resumes at record pace," Nov. 1). Hopefully, more Marylanders will be encouraged to participate as the kinks in the system are worked out, particularly the need for more early voting centers. I also found it somewhat irksome that The Sun waited until early voting was completed to publish its presidential endorsement.
NEWS
THE AEGIS STAFF REPORTS | November 7, 2012
Harford County voters had many reasons for packing the county's 75 polling places of Election Day Tuesday, and not all of them had to do with electing the nation's next commander-in-chief. The interest shown by Harford's voters translated a huge turnout, which caused long lines and waits at many locations around the county. Gretchen Hopley, of Bel Air, brought her daughter, Tennyson, with her to vote at Prospect Mill Elementary School near Bel Air around lunchtime Tuesday. A regular voter, Hopley said "I want her to know she has a say in the world, in how this world is run. " "And I want her to see my vote," Hopley said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
One of the biggest winners in Maryland Tuesday night was not technically on the ballot: the Democratic leadership in Annapolis. All four of the controversial ballot questions were about measures championed by Gov. Martin O'Malley and approved by the General Assembly, where Democrats hold the majority. And all four were affirmed by the voters. Those measures expand gambling, legalize same-sex marriage, allow in-state tuition for some illegal immigrants and create new congressional district boundaries.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | November 6, 2012
Several dozen people turned out Tuesday evening in Towson to share the final stop on the 2012 general election. "Election 2012: Returns After Dark," was held at the Towson Library, and featured a Johns Hopkins professor providing instant insight into day's election results. "It's just fun to follow,” said Owings Mills resident Dan Wentland. “It has an impact on us for the next four years.” Wentland, a Towson University alumnus, said he found the event on the county library system website and was enjoying the discourse between the attendees, all of whom he believes have a vested interest in the election.
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