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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 11, 1999
The Stanislavsky Theater Studio might not sound like a Maryland troupe, but this young company is based in Silver Spring. Founded by theater professionals who immigrated to this country from the former Soviet Union, the company takes its name from the late Russian director, actor and teacher Konstantin Stanislavsky.Tomorrow, the Stanislavsky Theater makes its Baltimore debut with the first of two productions to be performed at the Theatre Project. "The Little Tragedies," a quartet of short pieces by Alexander Pushkin, will run weekend nights through April 11. On March 20, it will be joined by matinees of a double bill of "Kashtanka," an adaptation of an Anton Chekhov story about a dog, and "The Miraculous Magical Balloon," an original pantomime.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | August 12, 2014
The awfulness of Gaza goes on. So does the madness in Iraq and Syria. Wildfires burn through the West, while in Washington, D.C., our do-absolutely-nothing Congress prepares to adjourn, freeing up time for representatives and senators to go home and campaign to be re-elected so they can accomplish nothing for another two years. It seems an opportune time to consider a far less depressing issue, one that, outside of Hollywood and the Redneck Riviera, affects only a small minority: artificial body enhancement, AKA cosmetic surgery or "having a little work done.
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NEWS
May 11, 2008
For the second year in a row, Turf Valley Resort is hosting a hot air balloon festival and other activities in the days leading up to the Preakness, the second leg of thoroughbred horse racing's Triple Crown. The two-day event starts at 2 p.m. Thursday and will include the Hot Air Balloon Festival, and a Pee-Wee Preakness with competitions for children such as three-legged races, face-painting and appearances from characters such as Bob the VidTech. There also will be more than 50 vendors at the event.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
A group of high school students studying atmospheric pressure and temperature is searching for a weather balloon and payload of research equipment they think disappeared somewhere in White Hall. The students, from Little Red School House and Elisabeth Irwin High School in New York City, launched the balloon about 9 a.m. Sunday from Chambersburg, Pa. But they lost radio contact with it about 15 minutes later, and they were unable to track it, junior Alexander Daley said in an e-mail.
TRAVEL
November 27, 2005
I had always wanted to go up in a hot-air balloon and decided there was no better way to do it than to attend the annual Albuquerque International Balloon Festival. So I joined a tour offered by Smithsonian Journeys. On the first day of the tour, we took a balloon ride as part of the mass ascension, during which hundreds of balloons rise in waves off the desert floor as the sun rises. A hot-air balloon rides with the wind, so the trip is quiet and the air is still - it's almost surreal at times.
NEWS
February 24, 1994
Whether it was done for profit or as a malicious prank, the thief who stole the 30-foot-tall hot air balloon from the Boston Chicken restaurant in the 7900 block of Ritchie Highway will never be accused of a lack of ambition.The theft happened sometime between 5 p.m. Sunday and noon Monday, police said. The white balloon displayed the restaurant's logo and had hovered over the restaurant since its opening.Police said the balloon is worth $1,200. There are no suspects, they said.POLICE LOG* Woods Edge: Someone stole a stereo and cassette tapes, all worth more than $500, from a 1991 Mercury Capri parked on Starwood Drive Sunday night.
FEATURES
By Emily Prager and Emily Prager,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 23, 1995
NEW YORK -- It is early Sunday morning a few weeks before Thanksgiving, in front of Macy's on Herald Square. Manny Bass, Macy's head balloon designer -- master of "cold air inflatables" as he calls them -- is overseeing the test flight of his latest creation.Dudley the Dragon, a 60-foot replica of the character from the children's show on PBS, is lying flat as a pancake on a tarp spread across Broadway, ready to be inflated. Mr. Bass, a handsome man of 60 with snow-white hair and twinkling light-blue eyes, excitedly traverses the edge of the tarp, advising the staff on the helium truck and instructing new balloon handlers.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | May 8, 1992
As minds shift toward the Preakness, many Baltimoreans look forward to balloons as much as horses. The annual Preakness balloon race -- celebrating its 20th launch tomorrow -- now qualifies as a major spring tradition.And, over the weekend, 32 hot air balloons from across the country will lend seasonal charm to other events around the area."Balloon races have such a great ability to draw people from all walks of life and of all ages," says Dan Sherrill, owner of the American Balloon Corp.
NEWS
April 25, 1994
It took less than 24 hours for a little blue balloon to lift off in Illinois, float 600 miles and land in a New Windsor cornfield.Popcorn, a 5-year-old Labrador retriever, found the balloon in the cornfield near her owner's home early Wednesday morning."
NEWS
June 11, 2002
Jeffrey S. Kemp, who worked in his family's parade balloon business, died Sunday of a heart attack at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. The Ocean City resident was 40. Mr. Kemp, a former resident of Severna Park, was a balloon technician for Kemp Balloons in Selbyville, Del. The business was formerly located in Glen Burnie. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton, he attended city public schools. A memorial service will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday at Ullrich Funeral Home in Berlin.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis and Tim Swift and The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
Those hoping for an instant fortune have another chance at lottery glory after Friday's massive Mega Millions drawing turned out no big winner. Lottery players now stand to win $550 million, with a cash option of $229 million. Officials announced an increase in the jackpot early Saturday morning. A flurry of ticket sales between now and the next drawing on Tuesday could send the prize even higher. The jackpot -- the now fourth largest in U.S. history -- has been growing since Oct. 1. In that drawing, an Anne Arundel County man, who chose to remain anonymous, won $189 million, said Carole Everett, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Scientists from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory are set to launch a massive balloon above the skies of New Mexico this weekend for a glimpse of Comet ISON, the rare comet on its way to looping past the sun and Earth in the coming months. The balloon will be carrying a telescope that will observe ISON, as well as another comet that commonly passes through the solar system, in infrared light to see the water and carbon dioxide emanating from it. The mission was pulled together over the past seven months to gather data on ISON before it passes closely by the sun, potentially destroying the comet.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
The Powerball jackpot ballooned to $400 million after no one won the latest drawing on Saturday, the fourth time this year that lottery's jackpot has passed the $300 million mark. Massive lottery jackpots have become more common in recent years. So far this year, a New Jersey resident netted a $338 million Powerball jackpot in March, a Florida woman won a $590 million Powerball jackpot in May, and three people in Minnesota and New Jersey split a $448 million Powerball jackpot in August.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
When students from the Howard County Public Library's HiTech digital media lab launched a weather balloon from Columbia on Wednesday, they predicted where it would land. Bianca Brade, 14, guessed somewhere in Virginia, in part because of proximity and the time the balloon would be airborne. Instead, it was spotted on the Jersey shore less than 24 hours later. But Bianca wasn't a bit disappointed. "I liked most, actually, seeing the balloon fly away. That was really cool," she said.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | March 4, 2013
Federal deficits are too large, and mounting national debt threatens future generations. But as Democrats and Republicans squabble over the mandatory spending cuts known as sequestration that went into effect Friday night, they are failing to face the facts of our budget situation or acknowledge the lessons of history. Since 2007, annual federal spending is up $1 trillion, and deficits jumped from $161 billion to $1.2 trillion over five years. Higher taxes on the wealthy and Obamacare levies will pull down the gap in 2014, but then it will rise again.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
Maryland's Fire Marshall has banned sky lanterns, the increasingly popular paper balloons that are sent aloft by the heat of a candle or fuel cell suspended from the bottom. "They're made with oiled rice paper and bamboo - it's almost kindling," said Deputy State Fire Marshal Bruce D. Bouch. "They have to land somewhere, and sometimes they're still partly on fire when they hit the ground. They've been known to ignite dry vegetation. " Bouch said the fire marshal's office frequently gets calls from people interested in using sky lanterns in weddings or other celebrations who want to know if they are legal in Maryland.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Lex Latex, the talking balloon, is feeling a little deflated these days.Sure, kids still squeal with delight when he's twisted into the shape of a poodle.But release him into the sky and those squeals become howls of protest. Or worse.In fact, legions of protesting schoolchildren have persuaded four states and a host of municipalities, including Baltimore, to ban the mass release of balloons.The youngsters, egged on by a pair of crusading biology teachers and a small group of environmentalists, say that wayward balloons can end upfatally lodged in the gullets of sea turtles, whales and shore birds.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | September 22, 1994
The Glen Burnie balloon company that created Woody Woodpecker for the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade and the gigantic red crab for the opening of the legislative session has packed up and moved to Delaware.Bob Kemp, president of Kemp Balloons Inc., said he relocated his 21-year-old business to give it room to expand.Delaware economic authorities were able to offer him more space at lower cost."I don't know if I could have pulled it off [in Maryland]," said the 63-year-old balloon maker, a Maryland native and a 1948 graduate of Glen Burnie High School.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
The Baltimore Development Corp. is requesting proposals for the former "balloon site" at 701 E. Baltimore Street after receiving a new, unsolicited plan for the site from The Cordish Cos. -- the Baltimore development firm that until recently held the development rights for the property. Cordish gained the right to build on the site in 2005. But Cordish's exclusive negotiating privilege for the property has expired, said Kim Clark, the BDC's acting president. Because Cordish recently submitted a new plan for the site, the BDC issued on Friday another request for proposals, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | October 8, 2012
It's the second leg of "The Amazing Race," and we learn some interesting factoids about the teams. For example, one of the blondes snorts when she is almost hit by a taxi. Was it a snort of laughter? Or of fear? It all happened so quickly. Also, were you wondering how Team Monster Truck met? Her former husband was his best friend, and the husband was killed in an accident. Wow. At least they're both happy now, although I think they would be even happier if they both had green hair.
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