Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBallets Russes
IN THE NEWS

Ballets Russes

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 27, 2006
Watching the emotionally and aesthetically engulfing Ballets Russes, you step into a living hall of legends. It gives you such an intense hit of creativity that afterward you may find yourself trying to jete out of the theater and into the street. From 1909 until the impresario's death in 1929, Sergei Diaghilev's original, Paris-based Ballets Russes revolutionized dance with the collaborations of choreographers like Fokine and Nijinska, dancers like Pavlova and Nijinsky, composers like Stravinsky and Ravel, and designers like Picasso and Matisse.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | July 3, 2013
The National Gallery of Art's "Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1909-1929: When Art Danced with Music" is a must-see exhibit for dance fans. This exceptionally beautiful exhibit takes you step by step through one of the great periods in dance history. A distant era is made to seem fresh again. Dance is such an ephemeral art form that a great performance one night typically exists only as a memory by the next night. Today's dance companies fortunately are good about filming performances and maintaining a visual archive, but there were major companies and performers in the early 20th century that now seem more legendary than real.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 12, 2003
It was one of musical history's most memorable nights. On the evening of May 29, 1913, the curtain at the Theatre des Champs-Elysees in Paris went up for the first time on Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, performed by Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russes and choreographed by Vaslav Nijinsky. Almost before the first notes had faded, pandemonium broke out in the house. Eyewitness descriptions of the evening (no two of which agree) include fistfights in the audience, objects hurled through the air, screams, fainting, invective, even a challenge to a duel.
FEATURES
February 17, 2006
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach. Full reviews at baltimoresun.com/movies. Annapolis -- wasn't shot in Annapolis and doesn't have an original thought in its head. James Franco is Jake Huard, son of a neglectful, working-class father. Determined not to spend his life in a factory, Jake gets an appointment to the Naval Academy. Those who have seen An Officer and a Gentleman know the rest of the plot. Once there, Jake faces nearly insurmountable odds, most the result of his uncanny ability to do the wrong thing at the wrong time.
NEWS
December 11, 1990
Reinaldo Arenas, 47, a novelist who spent several years in prison in Fidel Castro's Cuba, committed suicide Friday in his apartment in Manhattan, police said. He had AIDS, according to his literary agent, Thomas Colchie. Mr. Aenas found success as a writer after a decade of struggle in the United States, having escaped from Cuba during the Mariel exodus in 1980. His novels included "Farewell to the Sea," "Hallucinations" and "Singing From the Well," which won the Prix Medici in France for the best foreign novel of 1969.
NEWS
November 1, 1999
Kamal Adham,71, an adviser to the late Saudi Kings Faisal and Khaled, died Friday of a heart attack in Egypt. Mr. Adham, a brother-in-law of King Faisal, was in charge of Saudi intelligence during the early 1970s.The staunchly anti-Communist King Faisal dispatched him to Egypt in 1970 to persuade then-President Anwar Sadat to lessen his dependence on the Soviets.Mr. Adham's secret mediation is believed to have led Mr. Sadat to expel 16,000 Soviet military advisers from Egypt in 1972.From 1975 to 1982, Mr. Adham served as adviser to King Khaled.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | July 3, 2013
The National Gallery of Art's "Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1909-1929: When Art Danced with Music" is a must-see exhibit for dance fans. This exceptionally beautiful exhibit takes you step by step through one of the great periods in dance history. A distant era is made to seem fresh again. Dance is such an ephemeral art form that a great performance one night typically exists only as a memory by the next night. Today's dance companies fortunately are good about filming performances and maintaining a visual archive, but there were major companies and performers in the early 20th century that now seem more legendary than real.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2003
As part of "Vivat! St. Petersburg," Baltimore's salute to the Russian city's 300th birthday, Baltimore Museum of Art has launched the exhibitions Art of the Ballets Russes and The Brilliance of Bakst, illustrating the Russian ballet company's profound influence on music and art. Between 1909 and 1929, music and dance leapt forward into uncharted artistic regions under ballet impresario Sergei Diaghilev, with his collaborator artist Leon Bakst's costume...
NEWS
May 31, 1996
Al "Lash" LaRue,78, a bullwhip-cracking star of low-budget 1940s Westerns whose movie career quickly faded with the onset of the television age, died May 21 in Burbank, Calif. Moviegoers in the years after World War II knew him for his handiwork with a whip and trademark black outfits, but he never achieved the enduring fame of such movie cowboys as Gene Autry and Roy Rogers. His films included "Song of Old Wyoming" in 1945, "The Caravan Trail" in 1945, "Law of the Lash" in 1947and "Son of Billy the Kid" in 1949.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 2002
Ballet Theatre of Maryland in the 2002-2003 season will honor the life of Edward Stewart, the BTM founding artistic director. Stewart, who died of lung cancer July 30, left a legacy of dedication and discipline for the dancers who begin a new season without him. A number of guest choreographers will offer their artistic perspectives in new productions. The company will not select a full-time artistic director until at least the end of the season. The season begins with a program designed by choreographer Peter Anastos, who arrived Sept.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 27, 2006
Watching the emotionally and aesthetically engulfing Ballets Russes, you step into a living hall of legends. It gives you such an intense hit of creativity that afterward you may find yourself trying to jete out of the theater and into the street. From 1909 until the impresario's death in 1929, Sergei Diaghilev's original, Paris-based Ballets Russes revolutionized dance with the collaborations of choreographers like Fokine and Nijinska, dancers like Pavlova and Nijinsky, composers like Stravinsky and Ravel, and designers like Picasso and Matisse.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2003
As part of "Vivat! St. Petersburg," Baltimore's salute to the Russian city's 300th birthday, Baltimore Museum of Art has launched the exhibitions Art of the Ballets Russes and The Brilliance of Bakst, illustrating the Russian ballet company's profound influence on music and art. Between 1909 and 1929, music and dance leapt forward into uncharted artistic regions under ballet impresario Sergei Diaghilev, with his collaborator artist Leon Bakst's costume...
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 12, 2003
It was one of musical history's most memorable nights. On the evening of May 29, 1913, the curtain at the Theatre des Champs-Elysees in Paris went up for the first time on Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, performed by Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russes and choreographed by Vaslav Nijinsky. Almost before the first notes had faded, pandemonium broke out in the house. Eyewitness descriptions of the evening (no two of which agree) include fistfights in the audience, objects hurled through the air, screams, fainting, invective, even a challenge to a duel.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 2002
Ballet Theatre of Maryland in the 2002-2003 season will honor the life of Edward Stewart, the BTM founding artistic director. Stewart, who died of lung cancer July 30, left a legacy of dedication and discipline for the dancers who begin a new season without him. A number of guest choreographers will offer their artistic perspectives in new productions. The company will not select a full-time artistic director until at least the end of the season. The season begins with a program designed by choreographer Peter Anastos, who arrived Sept.
NEWS
November 1, 1999
Kamal Adham,71, an adviser to the late Saudi Kings Faisal and Khaled, died Friday of a heart attack in Egypt. Mr. Adham, a brother-in-law of King Faisal, was in charge of Saudi intelligence during the early 1970s.The staunchly anti-Communist King Faisal dispatched him to Egypt in 1970 to persuade then-President Anwar Sadat to lessen his dependence on the Soviets.Mr. Adham's secret mediation is believed to have led Mr. Sadat to expel 16,000 Soviet military advisers from Egypt in 1972.From 1975 to 1982, Mr. Adham served as adviser to King Khaled.
NEWS
May 31, 1996
Al "Lash" LaRue,78, a bullwhip-cracking star of low-budget 1940s Westerns whose movie career quickly faded with the onset of the television age, died May 21 in Burbank, Calif. Moviegoers in the years after World War II knew him for his handiwork with a whip and trademark black outfits, but he never achieved the enduring fame of such movie cowboys as Gene Autry and Roy Rogers. His films included "Song of Old Wyoming" in 1945, "The Caravan Trail" in 1945, "Law of the Lash" in 1947and "Son of Billy the Kid" in 1949.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW AND CHRIS KALTENBACH | February 3, 2006
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach. Full reviews at baltimoresun.com/movies. Annapolis -- wasn't shot in Annapolis and doesn't have an original thought in its head. James Franco is Jake Huard, son of a neglectful, working-class father. Determined not to spend his life in a factory, Jake gets an appointment to the Naval Academy. Those who have seen An Officer and a Gentleman know the rest of the plot. At the academy, Jake faces nearly insurmountable odds, most the result of his uncanny ability to do the wrong thing at the wrong time.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.