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August 12, 1998
Quote: "If we've got to find out what kind of ballclub we've got at this point in the season, we're in trouble. We think we've got a good ballclub. We're just a little banged up right now."-- Indians manager Mike Hargrove on the team's rash of injuries.It's a fact: Oakland and Minnesota are the only AL teams that have not drawn 1 million at home this season.Who's hot: The Yankees' Bernie Williams has a 13-game hitting streak.Who's not: The Tigers, who have lost eight straight, have scored three or fewer runs in 10 of their past 13 games.
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SPORTS
By Phil Rogers and On Baseball | May 18, 2010
Branch Rickey knew what he was talking about when he said he would rather trade a player a year too soon than a year too late. He wasn't speaking about franchise icons specifically, but that wisdom carries over to the mess the Mariners find themselves in with Ken Griffey Jr. It's no huge surprise Griffey's pride and addiction to the lifestyle allowed him to overstay his ability. The steady decline of his batting average (.277 in 2007, .245 in '08, .214 in '09) exposed his diminishing skills.
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SPORTS
By Buster Olney | May 5, 1996
On the field: Brady Anderson is on a serious roll. His homer leading off the first was his sixth of the season, breaking Don Buford's club record of five. No wonder that in the eighth inning yesterday, in the rather drab final few innings of the Orioles' 10-5 win, fans in the center-field stands suddenly began chanting Anderson's name. "Brady's the best," said Bill Ripken. "What more do you want? What can you say about that but 'wow'?In the dugout: For the second straight game, the Orioles' bullpen could rest easy.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | April 11, 2010
Without fear of argument, I think we can say there are better ways to start the season than how the Orioles have. Let's look at what's happened so far: They lost 5-2 today and were swept by the rebuilding Toronto Blue Jays in the first home series of the season. Their All-Star second baseman – the guy with the tricky herniated disk in his back – has an abdominal strain that's expected to land him on the disabled list Monday. Their new $12-million closer is getting hit like a piñata and blowing saves and is now being kept out of pressure situations so he can work on his mechanics -- and, presumably, his psyche, too. (Keeping a closer out of pressure situations – that's like keeping a member of the bomb squad out of pressure situations, isn't it?
SPORTS
By Michael Kay and Michael Kay,New York Daily News | October 8, 1991
NEW YORK -- The worst-kept secret in baseball was made official early yesterday afternoon when New York Yankees general manager Gene Michael pulled the plug on Stump Merrill's managerial respirator.Merrill, 47, poised to be fired since late July when his team went into a horrid tailspin, was fired with one year remaining on his contract. His standing in the organization is unsettled. No replacement has been named, and the front office insists there is no timetable to name one.Although the team improved marginally from a 95-loss last-place season in 1990 to a 71-91 fifth-place record this year, most observers felt Merrill had lost the respect of his ballclub.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer Staff writer Eric Siegel contributed to this article | October 28, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer was in a blue funk yesterday, hanging his head in his hands throughout the morning's weekly Board of Public Works meeting.The day after Baltimore learned a decision on its NFL expansion bid would be put on hold until Nov. 30, the governor even wore a tie appropriate for the occasion: The brightly colored pattern, set against a dark blue background, featured cartoon-like exclamations: "!"An aide said the tie selection was no coincidence.As he ended the meeting, the governor turned to state treasurer Lucille Maurer and said that Tuesday was "the most frustrating and sad day" he has had.Asked if the Baltimore delegation will consider legal action, Mr. Schaefer said: "We have no plan on suing.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 21, 1991
ARLINGTON, Texas -- Rookie pitcher Arthur Rhodes will not be treated with kid gloves, even if he is one of the kids that the Baltimore Orioles are depending heavily upon for the the future.Rhodes is scheduled to make his major-league debut tonight against a Texas Rangers lineup that has been very tough on left-handers, but manager John Oates said yesterday that he will not be quick to pull the young left-hander out of a difficult situation."There's a fine line between letting someone get beaten down and letting him learn to work out of trouble," Oates said.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 28, 2006
There really are only two ways to go with the Miguel Tejada saga. Either the Orioles are in denial about their superstar shortstop, or the rest of us should never again believe our eyes. Tejada is leading the team in batting average, home runs and RBIs, so there's certainly no reason to panic, but the change in his demeanor over the past year has been so obvious that it's difficult to understand why club officials don't think it's anything to worry about. "He's doing what he's supposed to be doing," manager Sam Perlozzo said yesterday.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 25, 1994
There is a lot of talk about whether Johnny Oates should be fired, which is hardly surprising. One of the advantages of spending $173 million to buy a baseball team, as Peter Angelos and his group did, is that you get to pick the manager you want.Spending that much money means you have every right not to have to live with your predecessor's version of a good idea.But spending that much money doesn't necessarily mean you know what's right. It doesn't mean you know how to fix what ails your ballclub.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 5, 1996
Ten o'clock Sunday night, as he stared at a newspaper sports page that quoted Jon Miller, the best baseball voice of his generation, declaring he was leaving the Baltimore Orioles, the telephone rang in Peter Angelos' home."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 28, 2006
There really are only two ways to go with the Miguel Tejada saga. Either the Orioles are in denial about their superstar shortstop, or the rest of us should never again believe our eyes. Tejada is leading the team in batting average, home runs and RBIs, so there's certainly no reason to panic, but the change in his demeanor over the past year has been so obvious that it's difficult to understand why club officials don't think it's anything to worry about. "He's doing what he's supposed to be doing," manager Sam Perlozzo said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2004
Miguel Tejada has started to snap out of it ... out of the two-week funk that dragged down his numbers and kept him from picking up his new team. He had three hits on Thursday night in Los Angeles. He had another multi-hit game Friday in Colorado. It hasn't been a homerfest, but he started cranking out hit after hit just as people were starting to wonder whether maybe he wasn't quite the savior that everyone made him out to be when he signed that six-year, $72 million contract last winter.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2002
Don't have a cow, man, but when the Triple-A Calgary Cannons move to Albuquerque, N.M., next season, they'll be getting a new nickname. It might be the 66ers, Atoms, Dukes or Roadrunners. Those are four of the candidates voted on in a recent Albuquerque Tribune Internet poll. The runaway reader favorite, though, is the Isotopes. The nickname comes from a March 2001 episode of The Simpsons in which Homer, our favorite baseball-loving cartoon doofus, learns of a plot to move his favorite minor-league team, the Springfield Isotopes, to Albuquerque and protests with a hunger strike that makes him delirious.
NEWS
By Gail Dixon-Williams and Gail Dixon-Williams,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 2000
"Take me out to the ball game" is the refrain going through the heads of many in county baseball and softball circles, as Opening Day -- a rite of spring -- occurs this month. Some county programs began competing the first weekend of April; others have had practice sessions but don't start play until this weekend or next. But for all, from tee-ball players unsure what the game is about to parents and coaches who remember so well, the umpire's call to "play ball" is not only an order that gets things rolling; it's the stuff of memories.
TOPIC
By BURT SOLOMON | May 9, 1999
AFTER SO MANY botched games and mindless acts at Camden Yards since this painful baseball season started, it was a delight to witness such smart and snappy playing the other evening. Patience at the plate, quickness on the base paths, courageous defense, crafty pitching, true teamwork -- it was the legendary Oriole Way, resurrected.Only it wasn't the Orioles who were playing that way, but the Cuban all-star team, which was everything the Orioles used to be. The Cubans did all the little things right.
SPORTS
August 12, 1998
Quote: "If we've got to find out what kind of ballclub we've got at this point in the season, we're in trouble. We think we've got a good ballclub. We're just a little banged up right now."-- Indians manager Mike Hargrove on the team's rash of injuries.It's a fact: Oakland and Minnesota are the only AL teams that have not drawn 1 million at home this season.Who's hot: The Yankees' Bernie Williams has a 13-game hitting streak.Who's not: The Tigers, who have lost eight straight, have scored three or fewer runs in 10 of their past 13 games.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 16, 1997
The first time Robert Irsay met William Donald Schaefer, he brought his priest and his accountant with him. Schaefer thought, I understand the accountant, but why the priest? Later, he found out. They were already performing the last rites over the Baltimore Colts.Now someone will pronounce all the officially respectful words over Irsay, dead nearly 13 years after he committed the most infamous act in Baltimore sports history. But nobody's lighting candles around here. Irsay, dead at 73, is more unwelcome proof that the good die young.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Roch Kubatko and Joe Strauss and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1997
While a 100-win season once seemed a near-certainty, Orioles manager Davey Johnson now considers it "just a number."A game from clinching a wild-card berth and standing on the cusp of the franchise's first division title since 1983, Johnson now says the landmark is of secondary importance to resting position players and aligning his rotation in preparation for the postseason.Downplaying the feat comes with personal loss for Johnson, who would join Sparky Anderson and Whitey Herzog as the only managers ever to achieve 100 wins in both leagues.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1998
What is supposedly doomed to be a season of defeat continued as a month of discovery last night at Camden Yards. The Orioles extended their second-half winning streak to five in a 5-0 lockdown of the Toronto Blue Jays behind a brilliant and unexpected performance from starting pitcher Nerio Rodriguez and four RBIs from catcher Lenny Webster.Rodriguez (1-2) was more than last night's winning pitcher. He became a metaphor for the Orioles' long stretch of nowhere that now teases with competent starting pitching and energetic defense.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 31, 1998
Wandering through an antiques store over the weekend, come upon a stack of musty old magazines and find Sport from March 1954. Here is my youth, now stored among the ancient relics of another civilization. Sport was the bible of my boyhood, and March 1954 was its Genesis - for that April was the very commencement of modern Orioles baseball."Will Baltimore Be Another Milwaukee?" the magazine's headline asks. A year earlier, the now-forgotten Boston Braves ("Spahn and Sain and pray for rain")
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