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By GILBERT LEWTHWAITE | August 10, 2000
The rain was relentless, and the prospect of an overnight 70-mile sail from Annapolis to St. Mary's City was becoming a dubious pleasure. Taking shelter under the Spa Creek bridge, my shorts soaked, my shoes waterlogged, the rain pouring down my neck, I looked over the pontoons of the Annapolis Yacht Club's annex toward the 73-foot dark green hull and 91-foot raked black, carbon mast of the sloop Donnybrook. There was no sign of life aboard. Then a similarly drenched figure in red weather gear dashed toward the boat.
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By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2011
The first step in stopping invasive species from hitching a ride into the Chesapeake Bay aboard cargo ships is determining how to make massive ballast tanks an inhospitable environment. Maryland scientists hope they will find the answer aboard a new $2.7 million floating laboratory that is able to test ballast-water treatment systems under real-time conditions. The 155-foot vessel is part of the research fleet operated by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 20, 1999
ONE OF THE advantages of living in a house for a long time is that when something breaks, it usually is a repeat performance. The mystery of "what is that terrible noise?" is gone.Over the years, for instance, I have learned that a "chirp" coming from the refrigerator freezer means the fan motor has gone kaput. I now know that a growl from underneath the kitchen sink means the garbage disposal is gummed up, probably with potato peels, and that the problem can be remedied with a wrench that fits into the disposal's belly.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 14, 2008
My Name Is Bruce *** ( 3 STARS) An exercise in self-indulgent filmmaking at its most endearing, My Name Is Bruce casts beloved grade-B horror star Bruce Campbell as obnoxious grade-B horror star Bruce Campbell, and wonders what would happen if the cinema worlds created for his films became real. At least, that's kind of what it does, in a we've-got-to-come-up-with-a-coherent-plotline-for-this-film sort of way. But mostly, what My Name Is Bruce does is give its director-star endless opportunities to make fun of himself.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | November 18, 1991
The state ordered a contractor to remove railroad ballast dumped in a Baltimore County sinkhole this month, just weeks after the federal government announced plans to test soil from the same rail bed for contamination.The State Highway Administration two weeks ago ordered the removal of two truckloads that a contractor had dumped into the sinkhole on Falls Road, just south of the Baltimore Beltway, said Charles Harrison, SHA district engineer for Baltimore and Harford counties.The state cited concerns that the ballast had not been tested for pollutants, although the firm that hauled the rocks claims they were clean.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2000
The ballast water that keeps merchant vessels entering Chesapeake Bay stable -long known to carry exotic plankton, shellfish and fin fish - also carries potentially dangerous microorganisms from around the world, a new study says. The study by a group of bay scientists, which appears today in the British journal Nature, found high concentrations of microbes in the ballast water of ships arriving from foreign ports. Greg Ruiz, the lead researcher, said there have been no reports of disease tied to the foreign organisms but the findings show a need for more research.
NEWS
By John M. Biers and John M. Biers,STATES NEWS SERVICE | October 27, 1996
For the first time, the federal government will protect the Chesapeake Bay and other watersheds across the nation from invasive species carried by foreign ships.The National Invasive Species Act, signed yesterday by President Clinton, sets up a program to prevent contamination during the release of ballast water carried by giant ships from around the world.The policy is intended to halt the "game of biological roulette," said Dr. James Carlton, an authority on marine invaders."Right now, we don't [know]
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 3, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO - A judge has ordered repeal of a federal regulation that has allowed ships to discharge ballast water freely into U.S. harbors and coastal waters. U.S. District Judge Susan Illston said last week that the 1972 Clean Water Act prohibits the practice. Government and other reports have identified ballast water as the main source for the spread of invasive foreign species - more than 500 of them - that have been ruining U.S. wetlands and driving out native marine plant and animal life.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 19, 1996
THERE WAS A HUM in the kitchen. At first I treated the hum the way all veteran homeowners treat strange noises. I pretended it would go away.When it didn't, I checked out the usual suspects, the kids, the radio, the refrigerator. All were known noise offenders. The percentages were usually pretty high, that at any given moment, one of them would be guilty. But in this case, they were innocent.The "hummer" turned out to be a fluorescent light fixture. It was the first of four such fixtures, each about 2 feet long, that were attached to the bottom of the kitchen cabinets.
NEWS
By Kathy Bergen Smith and Kathy Bergen Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2003
Tim Mullady peers into a microscope in a darkened room at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater. He is counting cells from a sample of ballast water taken from a ship, looking for vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes human cholera - and sometimes is discharged from that ballast into local waters along with scores of other "foreign" organisms. Mullady is part of the National Marine Invasion Research Program, which provides the Coast Guard and Congress with information from the forefront of the research community on this issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2008
Ballast : (Strand Releasi ng) A single mom on the Mississippi Delta copes with a man from her past while struggling to raise her son. With Tarra Riggs and JimMyron Ross. Let the Right One In : (Magnolia Pictures) A bullied 12-year-old boy finds love and revenge through a beautiful but odd girl who turns out to be a vampire. With Kare Hedebrant and Lina Leandersson. In Swedish with English subtitles. My Name is Bruce : (Image Entertainment) Actor Bruce Campbell is mistaken for his character Ash from the Evil Dead trilogy and forced to fight a real monster in a small town in Oregon.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | July 22, 2008
Scientists at a new research center in Maryland will test strategies to kill invasive species and prevent them from hurting the Chesapeake Bay, according to an announcement scheduled for today. More than 150 exotic species are now thriving in the bay, often hitchhiking here in the ballast water of ships from Asia and Europe. A few of the most aggressive, like the oyster-killing parasite MSX, have overwhelmed native creatures. The new Maritime Environmental Resource Center at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science will be based in Solomons in Southern Maryland and receive about $5 million over five years from the state and federal governments.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | March 8, 2007
A 712-foot ship loaded with coal that ran aground in the Chesapeake Bay was freed yesterday morning, a week after it became stuck off the coast of Tilghman Island. Workers tried for nearly three days to unload a portion of the 74,000 tons of coal aboard the carrier before finishing the job late Tuesday night. It took another eight hours to remove the ship's ballast water. Once its load was lightened, four tugboats wrested the MV Montrose off the shoal. The ship, which was bound for Romania, is now anchored at Solomons Island, where the Coast Guard is inspecting it. Divers will also examine the ship's bottom to make sure it isn't damaged, Coast Guard Petty Officer Christopher Evanson said.
NEWS
By Michael Hawthorne and Michael Hawthorne,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 8, 2005
CHICAGO - The Bush administration laid out an ambitious plan yesterday to clean up and protect the Great Lakes, but even some of the president's allies consider the $20 billion price tag to be unrealistic. Led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a group of local, state, tribal and federal officials called for more aggressive efforts to clean up contaminated ports, fix aging sewer systems, block invasive species and improve the shoreline. The group, organized by an executive order President Bush signed in May 2004, urged Congress and the states to make the world's largest freshwater system a greater priority.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 3, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO - A judge has ordered repeal of a federal regulation that has allowed ships to discharge ballast water freely into U.S. harbors and coastal waters. U.S. District Judge Susan Illston said last week that the 1972 Clean Water Act prohibits the practice. Government and other reports have identified ballast water as the main source for the spread of invasive foreign species - more than 500 of them - that have been ruining U.S. wetlands and driving out native marine plant and animal life.
NEWS
By MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE | January 23, 2005
MINNEAPOLIS - The U.S. Coast Guard says it must find new ways to keep foreign species out of the Great Lakes, conceding that its regulation of transoceanic ships since 1993 hasn't done the job. In a little-noticed announcement in the Federal Register this month, the Coast Guard confirmed what scientists have been documenting for years: Invasive species can be carried into the Great Lakes in the residual water and mud at the bottom of ships' ballast water...
NEWS
November 16, 1996
THE UNITED STATES has declared war on alien invaders -- the potentially dangerous infiltrators of American waters that secretly travel in ballast water tanks of giant ocean-going ships.That's especially good news for the Chesapeake Bay, where more than 3 billion gallons of foreign water are dumped by cargo vessels each year. Hidden in that ballast water (taken on by ships for stabilization) are thousands of exotic, alien organisms that pose dramatic threats to the ecology of the estuary.The new National Invasive Species Act calls for ships to discharge their ballast tanks 200 miles from coastal waters, monitoring of the voluntary effort and funding of research to develop anti-invader techniques.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 24, 2004
SUN SCORE : * Alexander the Great still conquers the known world of antiquity in Oliver Stone's Alexander, but, dramatically, absolutely nothing seems to happen. This nearly-three-hour feature plays like the most extravagant educational filmstrip ever made. The imagery merely illustrates the running - make that stumbling - commentary of the narrator, Alexander's one-time supporter Ptolemy (Anthony Hopkins), who relates the Greek king's story 40 years after the monarch's death. Alexander (Colin Farrell)
NEWS
By Kathy Bergen Smith and Kathy Bergen Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2003
Tim Mullady peers into a microscope in a darkened room at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater. He is counting cells from a sample of ballast water taken from a ship, looking for vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes human cholera - and sometimes is discharged from that ballast into local waters along with scores of other "foreign" organisms. Mullady is part of the National Marine Invasion Research Program, which provides the Coast Guard and Congress with information from the forefront of the research community on this issue.
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