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SPORTS
September 24, 2002
On deck Odalis Perez, 3-0 against the Rockies this year, faces them tonight for the Dodgers. He said it "Does not being in a World Series make me less of a ball player? Absolutely not." Barry Bonds, Giants outfielder
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NEWS
March 12, 2014
An article in the March 10, 1939 edition of The Catonsville Herald and Baltimore Countian reported the passing of a well-known resident. Last Sunday, March 5, a memorial service was held in the Catonsville M.E. Church at eleven o'clock for Thomas Hammond Griffith , known as "the grand old man of Catonsville," who died at his home here on February 9. The late Mr. Griffith was born in 1854 at "Black Castle", Frederick county, Md. He...
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NEWS
March 6, 2014
Your recent article about Babe Ruth incorrectly implied that the Baltimore Orioles stopped in Fayetteville, N.C., en route to spring training in Florida ( "Babe Ruth's first in flight in Fayetteville," Feb. 27). In 1914, only a few baseball teams traveled as far south as Florida for spring training. Fayetteville, not Florida, was the Orioles' destination, and it was also the team's spring training headquarters during Babe Ruth's rookie professional season. The article also included a clipping with a photograph purported to be "the first picture ever made of Babe Ruth as a professional ball player.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Your recent article about Babe Ruth incorrectly implied that the Baltimore Orioles stopped in Fayetteville, N.C., en route to spring training in Florida ( "Babe Ruth's first in flight in Fayetteville," Feb. 27). In 1914, only a few baseball teams traveled as far south as Florida for spring training. Fayetteville, not Florida, was the Orioles' destination, and it was also the team's spring training headquarters during Babe Ruth's rookie professional season. The article also included a clipping with a photograph purported to be "the first picture ever made of Babe Ruth as a professional ball player.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2012
Here are some final thoughts from a very tired TV/media critic who didn't miss an inning of Orioles playoff baseball while covering the rest of a huge and sprawling beat. This week, it ranged from the debut of ABC's "Nashville," to  Joe Biden  smirking his way through the vice-presidential debate with Paul Ryan. First, I loved every TV minute of Orioles playoff baseball the last week. It started last Friday night with the euphoria of winning the wildcard showdown in Texas, and for a week, it was like the first Friday of the NCAA basketball tournament for TV baseball addicts like me. I never clicked the set off of TBS, except to go to TNT when the backup channel was used for an inning or two of the Orioles or the Nationals.
SPORTS
By Colleen Thomas and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2013
Matt McPhearson is the outlier of his family, the ugly duckling of sorts. With a family of football players, the gridiron seemed like the obvious choice. Instead, McPhearson chose baseball, and Thursday night the speedy center fielder could become the first high school or college player from the state to be drafted in the first or second round of baseball's amateur draft since 2007. "It's a blessing," said McPhearson, who lives in Columbia and just finished his senior year at Riverdale Baptist School in Prince George's County.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
An article in the March 10, 1939 edition of The Catonsville Herald and Baltimore Countian reported the passing of a well-known resident. Last Sunday, March 5, a memorial service was held in the Catonsville M.E. Church at eleven o'clock for Thomas Hammond Griffith , known as "the grand old man of Catonsville," who died at his home here on February 9. The late Mr. Griffith was born in 1854 at "Black Castle", Frederick county, Md. He...
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 25, 2004
WAS WATCHING the World Series last night and ... excuse me for a moment. PA-TOO! Sorry, had to spit. Been doing that a lot lately. Don't know what's come over me. Maybe it's subliminal. Watching too much baseball. Boy, those Red Sox and Cardinals love to spit, don't they? Have you ever seen so much spitting in your life? They spit in the dugout. They spit at the plate. They spit in the field. And the TV cameras seem to capture every single stream of saliva from both teams. You've got close-ups of players spitting.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 10, 1996
EVEN THOUGH the weather has been more than a little soggy this spring, the local baseball season is in full swing. More than 150 youngsters are planning to march in the Fort Smallwood Optimists' annual Little League Parade at 9 a.m. tomorrow.Marchers will assemble at Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2462, 1720 Bayside Beach Road, and march to Corey Park, adjacent to Fort Smallwood Elementary School on Poplar Ridge Road.Joining the T-ball, softball and hardball players and coaches will be , , Majorette and Drum Corps and .Members of the K-9 Corps will give a demonstration at 10 a.m. on the field.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | December 17, 2006
The instinctive, from-the-gut reaction: The ball feels funny. Not funny ha-ha, funny strange. The reaction to the NBA's new ball - by the usual army of public cynics who test their cheap one-liners on NBA players every chance they get - now that was funny ha-ha. The ball itself, though, feels ... odd. Off. Definitely wrong. Not something the best in the business should be using. It feels funny. It bounces funny. The seams are funny. Shaquille O'Neal was right: It was too much like one of those "cheap balls that you buy at the toy store, indoor-outdoor balls."
SPORTS
By Colleen Thomas and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2013
Matt McPhearson is the outlier of his family, the ugly duckling of sorts. With a family of football players, the gridiron seemed like the obvious choice. Instead, McPhearson chose baseball, and Thursday night the speedy center fielder could become the first high school or college player from the state to be drafted in the first or second round of baseball's amateur draft since 2007. "It's a blessing," said McPhearson, who lives in Columbia and just finished his senior year at Riverdale Baptist School in Prince George's County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2012
Here are some final thoughts from a very tired TV/media critic who didn't miss an inning of Orioles playoff baseball while covering the rest of a huge and sprawling beat. This week, it ranged from the debut of ABC's "Nashville," to  Joe Biden  smirking his way through the vice-presidential debate with Paul Ryan. First, I loved every TV minute of Orioles playoff baseball the last week. It started last Friday night with the euphoria of winning the wildcard showdown in Texas, and for a week, it was like the first Friday of the NCAA basketball tournament for TV baseball addicts like me. I never clicked the set off of TBS, except to go to TNT when the backup channel was used for an inning or two of the Orioles or the Nationals.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | December 17, 2006
The instinctive, from-the-gut reaction: The ball feels funny. Not funny ha-ha, funny strange. The reaction to the NBA's new ball - by the usual army of public cynics who test their cheap one-liners on NBA players every chance they get - now that was funny ha-ha. The ball itself, though, feels ... odd. Off. Definitely wrong. Not something the best in the business should be using. It feels funny. It bounces funny. The seams are funny. Shaquille O'Neal was right: It was too much like one of those "cheap balls that you buy at the toy store, indoor-outdoor balls."
NEWS
By ALIA MALIK and ALIA MALIK,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
Like many Americans, Marlin Ballard Jr. started playing Wiffle ball when he was a child. And, like an increasing number of Americans, he never stopped, although for many years his backyard games with family and friends were something of a shameful secret. "We loved the game," Ballard, 48, of Baltimore said, "but the culture in Maryland is, you're sissies because you like Wiffle ball." Yesterday's scene at the Randazzo Softball Park in Severn might have proven Ballard wrong. His team, the Baltimore Bees, joined 23 others for the Wiffle Up!
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
Blast coach Tim Wittman played in Kansas City last week because his team was desperate for bodies in this injury-filled season. It isn't something he wants to do. Only necessity pulls Wittman from the bench. "I couldn't walk for three days after that," he said. "My stamina is there. My mind is there. My heart is there. But I can't do it. I don't know how Daryl Doran does." Doran, like Wittman, is 41. But the player-coach of the St. Louis Steamers is an everyday player, doing more than adding depth.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 25, 2004
WAS WATCHING the World Series last night and ... excuse me for a moment. PA-TOO! Sorry, had to spit. Been doing that a lot lately. Don't know what's come over me. Maybe it's subliminal. Watching too much baseball. Boy, those Red Sox and Cardinals love to spit, don't they? Have you ever seen so much spitting in your life? They spit in the dugout. They spit at the plate. They spit in the field. And the TV cameras seem to capture every single stream of saliva from both teams. You've got close-ups of players spitting.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
A new era of night baseball was ushered into Mount Airy this week as town officials flipped the switch on a set of controversial light towers that have divided some residents and local ball players."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 8, 2003
HERE'S A quick quiz for you: What city agency can take a simple problem and then turn it into a putrid mess in no time at all? Why, the school system, of course. If it's a molehill, the folks down at North Avenue will make it a mountain. If it calls for simple arithmetic, they'll turn it into one requiring three-variable calculus every time. The mess in this case involves DeShawn Barrett, a 17-year-old Patterson High School junior who just wanted to play some football. Yes, yes, I can hear you now: Football's an extracurricular activity.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 2004
Matt DeFrank, 11, is learning more about the intricacies of baseball this fall. The fifth-grader at Rockburn Elementary School has been practicing and improving his pick-off move, as well as the best way to lead off first, second and third base. "We're working on [different] things, and it's not as serious," Matt said. "It's good to learn like [this]." Matt is playing fall baseball in the Elkridge Youth Organization, a group that has five teams of various ages working on the game in a low-key manner, much as the Howard County Youth Program does.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 8, 2003
HERE'S A quick quiz for you: What city agency can take a simple problem and then turn it into a putrid mess in no time at all? Why, the school system, of course. If it's a molehill, the folks down at North Avenue will make it a mountain. If it calls for simple arithmetic, they'll turn it into one requiring three-variable calculus every time. The mess in this case involves DeShawn Barrett, a 17-year-old Patterson High School junior who just wanted to play some football. Yes, yes, I can hear you now: Football's an extracurricular activity.
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